welding on gas tanks - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> General Rodding Tech
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 05:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
welding on gas tanks

I was reading all the members experiences while welding on fuel tanks and I respect everyones experiences and I am sory about the fatalities and accidents mentioned. However my experience concerning the subject is very simple. I grew up in Puerto Rico and we were very poor. As the Island is sourounded by an ocean, salt is every where around you. Gas tanks ussually rust easy. So been poor we do not have a choice but to weld and patch our tanks. The way I weld without any fear!! is removing the sending unit and making sure the fill tube is open, fill it all the way to the top with water, aply an open flame through the sending unit hole. A very small noise indicates the little fumes left between the water and thevery top of the fuel tank just burned up. No danger at all and most of the times you do not even notice the noise.
At this time you can drain the water and weld all you want or cut it in pieces if you want to dispose it.

Like I said, this is my way of welding on tanks. I have been doing it for 45 years in the auto restoration bussiness without a single incident.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 06:01 PM
adantessr's Avatar
'23 T-Bucket Pickup
 
Last wiki edit: Troubleshooting ignition Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Charleston , WV
Age: 62
Posts: 1,549
Wiki Edits: 3

Thanks: 43
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
I have done and have seen done many things that I won't confess to , in the interest of saving a buck. LOL . Would never recommend any of them .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 06:21 PM
matts37chev's Avatar
I don't understand?
 

Last journal entry: this is only a test
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Shelton,Wa.
Posts: 2,443
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
i will do alot of stuff that i will NOT recomend to other people
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 06:42 PM
adantessr's Avatar
'23 T-Bucket Pickup
 
Last wiki edit: Troubleshooting ignition Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Charleston , WV
Age: 62
Posts: 1,549
Wiki Edits: 3

Thanks: 43
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
i will do alot of stuff that i will NOT recomend to other people
Do I hear an echo in here ? LOL
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 07:27 PM
Jim Rockford's Avatar
World Famous VF-14
 

Last journal entry: Cleaned it up...
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Age: 43
Posts: 411
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 10
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by adantessr
Do I hear an echo in here ? LOL
Bunch of sissies. Good thing our forefathers wheren't a bunch of scared wussies, scared to take a chance on something unknown or dangerous, otherwise we would still be roaming around in the dark scared of every little noise. This country was built on people being adaptive and doing what it took to get the job done, Now accountants and lawyers and ***** *** government agencies have neutered this country so much we can't even fix our own car without having to buy a new part cause someone says its dangerous to rebuilt or repair something, Man up and get your balls out of your wifes purse.

Last edited by Jim Rockford; 02-10-2011 at 07:32 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2011, 07:39 PM
adantessr's Avatar
'23 T-Bucket Pickup
 
Last wiki edit: Troubleshooting ignition Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Charleston , WV
Age: 62
Posts: 1,549
Wiki Edits: 3

Thanks: 43
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Rockford
Bunch of sissies. Good thing our forefathers wheren't a bunch of scared wussies, scared to take a chance on something unknown or dangerous, otherwise we would still be roaming around in the dark scared of every little noise. This country was built on people being adaptive and doing what it took to get the job done, Now accountants and lawyers and ***** *** government agencies have neutered this country so much we can't even fix our own car without having to buy a new part cause someone says its dangerous to rebuilt or repair something, Man up and get your balls out of your wifes purse.
I am not saying that I'm afraid to repair my own parts. I just would not necessarily tell someone else to do it that way. How about cutting a pitman arm in two and rotating it 180 degrees and welding it back together. I did it on my T-bucket but sure wouldn't do it on somebody elses car. You can if you want , but not me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 12:56 AM
4 Jaw Chuck's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Age: 46
Posts: 4,990
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 91 Times in 74 Posts
My experience with any kind of fuel tank is that welding it is a temporary solution to a permanent problem, I've always used epoxy for temporary repairs with excellent results...even full of fuel. Had one epoxy repair last three years because I tried to unfold a bent flange which cracked while I was bending it...while full of fuel!

With replacement tanks available for any kind of vehicle for $150 or less you have to wonder how much your really saving welding a rusted tank thats only going to leak again in the near future as opposed to replacing with new...Puerto Rican availability notwithstanding.

How much did you charge for removing a fuel tank and filling it with water to weld it and then replacing it again...bet it would have only cost another few dollars to put in a new tank (and straps!). An temporary epoxy repair and then subsequent replacement would have been safer and a better investment.

Just sayin...
__________________
Outlawed tunes from outlawed pipes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 05:49 AM
Jim Rockford's Avatar
World Famous VF-14
 

Last journal entry: Cleaned it up...
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Age: 43
Posts: 411
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 10
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4 Jaw Chuck
My experience with any kind of fuel tank is that welding it is a temporary solution to a permanent problem, I've always used epoxy for temporary repairs with excellent results...even full of fuel. Had one epoxy repair last three years because I tried to unfold a bent flange which cracked while I was bending it...while full of fuel!

With replacement tanks available for any kind of vehicle for $150 or less you have to wonder how much your really saving welding a rusted tank thats only going to leak again in the near future as opposed to replacing with new...Puerto Rican availability notwithstanding.

How much did you charge for removing a fuel tank and filling it with water to weld it and then replacing it again...bet it would have only cost another few dollars to put in a new tank (and straps!). An temporary epoxy repair and then subsequent replacement would have been safer and a better investment.

Just sayin...

Lotta cars you can't get tanks for still.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 07:08 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Wheelbase database Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,590
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 6
Thanked 159 Times in 146 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4 Jaw Chuck
With replacement tanks available for any kind of vehicle for $150 or less
Really? Where do I buy one for my 1962 Olds F-85 wagon?

Oh, I didn't think so...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 07:37 AM
Member
 

Last journal entry: JB's 37 Pickup
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Smoky Mountains
Age: 76
Posts: 2,358
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Sky diving is safe but one screw up is 99.9% fatal only because it was not some ones day to die. Russian roulette is of the same mold, but one out of 6 odds are not good enough for me. I have been injured enough in my life time and will NEVER, NEVER, NEVER weld on a gas tank or any other container that has had a volatile substance in it. I am so paranoid about these time bombs that I will only use a flash light to look inside and is never activated near the opening.

Trees
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 09:17 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Wheelbase database Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,590
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 6
Thanked 159 Times in 146 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by trees
Sky diving is safe but one screw up is 99.9% fatal only because it was not some ones day to die. Russian roulette is of the same mold, but one out of 6 odds are not good enough for me. I have been injured enough in my life time and will NEVER, NEVER, NEVER weld on a gas tank or any other container that has had a volatile substance in it. I am so paranoid about these time bombs that I will only use a flash light to look inside and is never activated near the opening.

Trees
You certainly shouldn't do something that you don't feel comfortable doing, but in reality there are very safe procedures for welding gas tanks. It is mandatory that the interior be cleaned of volatiles, preferably by using an appropriate emulsion solution to neutralize the vapors. Once that's done and the tank is washed out, it's safe. The problem I had on my 62 was that the design of the internal baffles prevented me from completely emptying the solution out of the tank. That's a P.I.T.A.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 09:29 AM
sqzbox's Avatar
My pipes are my music
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: indiana
Age: 64
Posts: 2,938
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Rockford
Bunch of sissies. Good thing our forefathers wheren't a bunch of scared wussies, scared to take a chance on something unknown or dangerous, otherwise we would still be roaming around in the dark scared of every little noise. This country was built on people being adaptive and doing what it took to get the job done, Now accountants and lawyers and ***** *** government agencies have neutered this country so much we can't even fix our own car without having to buy a new part cause someone says its dangerous to rebuilt or repair something, Man up and get your balls out of your wifes purse.
Learning from others mistakes is why some of us still have our gonads in our pants and not smoldering on the ground.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 09:40 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,912
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
i will do alot of stuff that i will NOT recomend to other people

This is not a joking matter but unfortunately a lot of people feel that way and those are the people we hear about sometimes. I was in the welding and equipment business for many years and I saw a lot of serious accidents, almost every one of them was caused by someone taking a risk they were aware of before hand. As far as welding on fuel tanks I have personally seen the results of this twice and heard about several more in official mine safety bulletins so they were not just hearsay. One fuel tank fatality resulted from a guy using the VERY STUPID practice of purging the tank with exhaust gas, this STUPID trick has hurt a lot of people. The other one was an old Jeep gas tank that exploded and burned a guy that had been a full time mechanic for many years and although he survived he is crippled and badly scared, talked to him a while back and believe me this fellow is hard to look at. Take chances if you like but sooner or later the luck will turn to the wrong kind and another statistic will be added. The guy hurt with the Jeep gas tank just kept saying "I can't believe I did that I know better" but of course by then it was too late. Fellows if you won't recommend doing something to someone else then DON'T DO IT YOURSELF!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 10:31 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Wheelbase database Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,590
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 6
Thanked 159 Times in 146 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
...Fellows if you won't recommend doing something to someone else then DON'T DO IT YOURSELF!
Excellent advice. Unfortunately, sometimes it's just evolution in action.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2011, 12:03 PM
68NovaSS's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Working with chromed bolts
Last journal entry: New to me T-Bucket
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Nine Mile Falls/Suncrest, WA
Posts: 5,258
Wiki Edits: 9

Thanks: 105
Thanked 133 Times in 124 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Rockford
Bunch of sissies. Good thing our forefathers wheren't a bunch of scared wussies, scared to take a chance on something unknown or dangerous, otherwise we would still be roaming around in the dark scared of every little noise. This country was built on people being adaptive and doing what it took to get the job done, Now accountants and lawyers and ***** *** government agencies have neutered this country so much we can't even fix our own car without having to buy a new part cause someone says its dangerous to rebuilt or repair something, Man up and get your balls out of your wifes purse.
If I ever wanted any dynamite shrink wrapped, could I bring it over to your shop, you must have a propane torch laying around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent General Rodding Tech posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Welding Used Gas Tanks Quinte Hotrodding Basics 11 04-21-2009 08:02 AM
Butt welding vs Spot welding 69ChevelleAddict Body - Exterior 19 05-04-2008 01:47 AM
old gas tanks knighthawk Hotrodding Basics 8 04-26-2007 07:45 AM
Gas tanks chrisflock Hotrodding Basics 5 11-02-2006 01:08 PM
gas tanks 38 special General Rodding Tech 14 09-30-2003 05:52 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.