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Old 01-30-2013, 08:30 AM
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Welding Help

Hi All,

I am starting my first rod from scratch and my welding isn't the greatest. Where can I find some good information / "how to" advice online? Or should I just get a book on welding?

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Old 01-30-2013, 08:44 AM
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you tube has good information from Lincoln and Miller. Or go to their websites.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:47 AM
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I was in the same boat, I had Welded 35 years before (but had forgotten most of that), so I found that my local College had some night classes on Welding, and I took them-now, I was looking for help w/Tig welding (they only offered Gas and Stick), so I took the Gas Welding Class as you have to learn how to control the puddle (which is similar to both)-

Anyway, it really helped me to learn what to look for, and I was able to not only learn how to control the filler rod and puddle, but to know what a good weld looks like-for me, that made Mig welding a snap.

There are some good welding forums on the 'Net, but nothing works better than knowing the basics and getting out there and burning some rod (and making a lot of mistakes learning!)

Here's a few Forums:

WeldingWeb - Welding forum for pros and enthusiasts - Powered by vBulletin

Miller Welding Discussion Forums

This Forum is specifically for welding sheetmetal (Auto):

Processes > Joining Metal - Metal Meet Forums

Good luck, and if you have a specific question I'm sure many will help out-
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:14 AM
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welding

ck your local tech college and see what they offer.. ours offers a full offering of classes.. where r u located ?? u may want to update your bio to put it up so someone don't need to ask that again... i find it neat to see where people are located too..
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:43 AM
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weld info

Brian Martin has written a very good article on mig welding it was here on hotrodders and other forums. search "basic of basics" inverted Mig welding. you can down load Millers $ 20 Tig Handbook for free. I get a welding video each week from Jody Collier, he was a welding instructor now has a one man shop. Welding tips and tricks. com. I learned more from jody's posts than i did a night class
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:07 PM
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What are you trying to learn on... If it's a 110 unit,, It will be harder to learn on....The right machine has a lot to do with it...I had guy's come to my shop that bought some small machine and was having a hard time learning,,, I took about 15 Mins on my machine with them and they couldn't believe just how much better they was in ONLY 15 Mins..
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:15 PM
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A lot of technical high schools and junior colleges offer welding classes for not much money. That way you learn on good equipment, with a pro showing you what to do and what not to do. Practice a lot on scrap before you try welding critical items to your frame.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:47 PM
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X three for check out your local junior colleges.
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:04 PM
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Practice..I only weld occasionaly now and find I need to run some bead to get my hand back after a layoff from welding..Once you get the hang of it though it can be picked back up fairly quickly..

Sam
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I have tried most all of it and now do what is known to work..
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:30 PM
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Practice,,Practice,,Practice,, is one of the best ways to learn to weld...

Know the old saying...Practice makes perfect...
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timothale View Post
Brian Martin has written a very good article on mig welding it was here on hotrodders and other forums. search "basic of basics" inverted Mig welding. you can down load Millers $ 20 Tig Handbook for free. I get a welding video each week from Jody Collier, he was a welding instructor now has a one man shop. Welding tips and tricks. com. I learned more from jody's posts than i did a night class
Here is that "Basics of Basics" . "Basic of Basics" Welding - How do I repair body panels?

Print it out and read it a few times and get out there and practice.

Brian
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:37 PM
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reading up on tutorials is the best start then lots of practice. You must get used to the right sound, right wire speed, and right voltage. You can have the right sound and not have everything else right. My rule is the right sound as high as I can go without burning thru. Sheet metal is always quick zaps and after some experience you will find yourself wanting good light to aim at the places with most metal. Like if you lay your initial tacks. You then want to go back to an earlier tack and lay another one overlapping that one. It will not only help you with dissipating heat, it will also leave you with cleaner welds through out and not just a scattered mess. So experience helps you with finding right setting per situation, learning metal characteristics, learning your welder, and getting your style of welding down. Some guys like to weld with one hand and don't care for light. I like a bright light, one hand as a stabilizer, and the other on the trigger, a fresh cut wire, and I just have a bunch of things I do that can only be taught with experience. So reading will give you a good general idea but practicing on old fenders will help lots. Practice on 18 gauge if you plan on doing an old car. It helps to just cut squares out and re weld them in somewhere else, then practice fabricating a patch for the hole you just cut. This practice will help you when you need to make patches. it helps. After a while you will make any patch you want and never have to re cut it but just shave off a little here and there.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:55 PM
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Good stuff Henry, you hit on something I really believe in, weld hot! If you aren't blowing thru practicing you aren't welding hot enough. It's easy to lay something on top that isn't penetrating worth a darn. But start out welding pushing it and burning thru once in a while and learning the limits. It is much easier to back off a little than to push it more I have found. Besides when welding sheetmetal the faster you can weld it the less heat you have created.

Brian
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Old 01-31-2013, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NEW INTERIORS View Post
What are you trying to learn on... If it's a 110 unit,, It will be harder to learn on....The right machine has a lot to do with it...I had guy's come to my shop that bought some small machine and was having a hard time learning,,, I took about 15 Mins on my machine with them and they couldn't believe just how much better they was in ONLY 15 Mins..
What is really amazing is welding with a 220 3 phase. I was blown away with it at a shop I worked at with one. You could just about weld thru grease or something, it was amazing. From what I understand about it, as you mentioned the 110 is harder because it is one "wave" of current, while 220 is two making less of a "skip" from one arc to the next. The 3 phase gives you three, so it's of course even better.



We get a lot done with the 110 at work, we have about six of them and they do a heck of a job as long as you aren't trying to weld something too heavy.

Brian
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:59 AM
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new design welders

I have 4 welders, there is a big difference in what they will do.
The new inverters are a lot smaller and lighter. The old Lincoln ac tombstone buzz box does ok for farm machinery repair. It can be moved out to a power pole we have at a pump on the farm. I bought a used Lincoln Square wave Tig 255 , it is a big heavy machine, It will do tig and stick It has ac balance for tigging aluminum. My Lincoln sp200 Mig is also a big heavy machine, both need a forklift to move. I have an old Airco ac-dc hi freq I keep in the other shop. Not as good as the 255 but I can stick weld with Hi freq, easier welding rusty dirty farm machinery. I like the Duty cycle on the bigger welders, I can weld all day with one and not overheat it.
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