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Old 06-25-2013, 10:25 PM
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welding without waiting for the metal to cool

This is a good tip for guys working in shops. When you get jobs like these you don't want to be sitting there twiddling thumbs while the metal is cooling cause you'll never get anything done. The solution is simple...Weld as many things as you can at the same time.

So here's a bunch of stuff we can weld!



There's 12 different objects I weld at the same time so by the time I get back to the first thing I welded (the biggest rectangle) it's already cool. The 3 biggest patches had 3-4 staggered tacks on each turn before moving onto the next patch.



now I'll ride the tacks always staggering weld location



driver's side. now I got 6 different patches in rotation.












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Old 06-25-2013, 10:35 PM
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Good tip..
I never work on one thing at a time.. I would never get anything done...

This is what I always do, If I'm doing Metal work, Body work, Fiber glass, Or welding,,Also Primeing or painting,
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:43 PM
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yeah, I do a lot of skipping around while mudding so I'm not waiting for it to cure. I'll either be sanding on something else while it's hardening or I'll start metal bumping another dent.

If there's nothing else to do I might heat up the filler carefully.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:19 PM
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Those are some great fitting patch panels. Any particular reason you didn't want to fill in that hole at the top left of that Heat/AC fill panel? I saw where you filled in the one to the right along the seam.
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:51 PM
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I have to ask...

I have to ask, because I'm green... Is the black line on the right side of the large rectangle goin to be welded more or painted and filled with filler? I ask because I am wondering how perfect this has to be! I have some similar welds on my floor pan and was going to use seam sealer once it is primed.
Thanks,
Jerry
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Old 07-02-2013, 08:42 PM
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this is just a quarter mile truck. The black stuff was removed, the little hole next to the one I filled was welded at a later point. For the firewall I simply kitty haired it, sanded, skimmed, sanded, and then one final skim. The firewall will be wavy but we're not getting paid to make it perfect.
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:54 PM
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I usually keep air hose handy and cool down weld so I can keep on welding.
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:59 PM
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I usually keep air hose handy and cool down weld so I can keep on welding.
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Old 07-03-2013, 11:37 PM
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there's something to debate. I don't use air or water cause I believe that the sudden change of temps will warp the metal. If I use air I will let it cool naturally for a little bit then zap it with air, but never right behind the weld.

My focus is more on what kind of area it is. Sometimes it can be surrounded by body lines and be tight/stout and I know I can somewhat hammer on the welds in those areas, then there's spots where you want to make sure it cools down to room temp after each tack. Just depends on the area.

here's an example.



I know I want my first weld on this job to be the one right in the door jamb corner, probably the most important tack of them all in terms of stopping any shifting while welding, other than a couple plug welds in the jamb to keep the gap. Anyhow, So I tack that side then the other and move on. I could have probably pushed it with 3 tacks but that's asking for trouble, but the thought crossed my mind cause I'm looking at the corners, which will contain warpage, and that horizontal body line(can't see in pic), which will also help in those regards.

Then you got this one



This one would appear to be a good one where you can get it a little hot due to the curve in it, but it's still a relatively open area and I'd much rather risk it
on the first area I showed rather than this area.

Last edited by tech69; 07-03-2013 at 11:48 PM.
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Old 07-06-2013, 01:25 PM
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Nice work on the patches for the firewall.When it comes to the seams on pillars once you have it tacked an inch apart or so have you tried starting in the middle and then moving out towards the left and right?Obviously you still skip around but when you are to the point of welding it solid it seems to help with eliminating warpage.I learned that from an old guy from the philipines who torch welded everything.It works well for mig too,basically you are moving your heat out to the edges instead of the middle where it can warp and buckle.This also works very well when we used to have to use quarter skins back in the day before they came out with good oem type quarters.I also agree with you about not quenching while welding,it can cause more problems by shrinking the weld and surrounding area.
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Old 07-06-2013, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitmaks View Post
I usually keep air hose handy and cool down weld so I can keep on welding.
I did a test a while ago proving cooling the weld does in deed warp the metal. Let it cool naturally. A little display on weld techniques and warping.

Of course you can control this shrinkage even while cooling it, it can be done. The point is for someone without the knowledge to control it, it is best to do just as Henry as laid out here. I don't take the chance and simply wait to let it cool naturally. It's like I always say, it's not like you nothing else to do on the project right? Weld a little and let it cool while you are doing something else, it's not like you have to sit there and stare at it.

Brian
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Old 07-06-2013, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Typical car guy View Post
Nice work on the patches for the firewall.When it comes to the seams on pillars once you have it tacked an inch apart or so have you tried starting in the middle and then moving out towards the left and right?Obviously you still skip around but when you are to the point of welding it solid it seems to help with eliminating warpage.I learned that from an old guy from the philipines who torch welded everything.It works well for mig too,basically you are moving your heat out to the edges instead of the middle where it can warp and buckle.This also works very well when we used to have to use quarter skins back in the day before they came out with good oem type quarters.I also agree with you about not quenching while welding,it can cause more problems by shrinking the weld and surrounding area.
I like to overlap it on the tacks cause I like using a lot of heat and how the prior weld takes the heat and how you are left with less voids in the end. my general rule of thumb is skip around and as long as you're a couple inches away from the last tack you are ok, given you're not just staying on one patch for too many tacks. That said, the way me and Martin like to do it is somewhat different than a lot of us were taught to do it. I was taught with air/quenching in mind but learned to stay away after warping a hood-doh!

btw, I'll give that tip a try. thanks.
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