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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by garrell.770
did you ever tote canolopes in from a field or pull corn on the farm like i did?
Does picking citrus, pecans and pulling tobacco in the FL summertime and lighting smudge pots in the groves in the winter count?

First car was a '55 post. Eventually had a 301 w/3-speed and a welded 4.11. Worked two years after school and both summers in our 'yard for it. Not a particularly good deal, but I'd have been working, regardless. At least this way I got something.

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 07:32 AM
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what did you drive

I would say your farm work experiences are simular and yours would certainly count as your method of earning funds for your ride and expenses. Oh, i forgot hiring out to a neighbor in the fall and picking cotton, and the hay season in the hottest days of summer. Hauling moonshine was a lot more lucrative and exciting to a 17 yr. old, but also very scary. garrell
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Old 12-22-2011, 07:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
Great cars and great stories, no one has mentioned going to the drag strip or street racing. I fessed up to illegal racing and an even more illegal part night job, come on and come clean. I can't believe no one has mentioned bagging groceries or pumping gas to pay for your ride and gas. Does anyone remember what they paid for gas in high school? garrell
I had a full on wide open drag race at least once a week! And the Drag strip was right in town, Fremont Drag Strip one of the fastest in the nation. I was there often on Wednesday grudge night.

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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 08:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
Great cars and great stories, no one has mentioned going to the drag strip or street racing. I fessed up to illegal racing and an even more illegal part night job, come on and come clean. I can't believe no one has mentioned bagging groceries or pumping gas to pay for your ride and gas. Does anyone remember what they paid for gas in high school? garrell
I started a street race thread and it was shut down. I was told that the rules here don't permit it. Oh well, rules are rules. However, street racing is basically the back bone of hot rodding. In High School (69-72) I paid about a quarter per gallon of gas, and another quarter for a pack of smokes (quit 12 yrs ago). So, for ONE dollar, I had gas and smokes for the whole weekend
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 08:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
I would say your farm work experiences are simular and yours would certainly count as your method of earning funds for your ride and expenses. Oh, i forgot hiring out to a neighbor in the fall and picking cotton, and the hay season in the hottest days of summer. Hauling moonshine was a lot more lucrative and exciting to a 17 yr. old, but also very scary. garrell
Hay bailing (or stacking, actually) was something I did but despised. The rancher who I worked hay with had sandspurs in his fields, had to wear heavy flannel long sleeved shirts regardless of the heat. Miserable work. Never picked cotton but it had to have sucked as much as pulling tobacco or maybe worse. Either way you worked stooped over toting a load as you went.

Back then, car guys still in school mostly worked pumping gas, girls waited tables.

Cheapest gas was 24.9/gallon for regular at the Super Test station in Kissimmee during a gas war w/the next door gas station. They also sold reclaimed motor oil that was dispensed in glass jars w/screw-on spouts. They advertised 105 octane "super ethyl" gasoline.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
Great cars and great stories, no one has mentioned going to the drag strip or street racing. I fessed up to illegal racing and an even more illegal part night job, come on and come clean. I can't believe no one has mentioned bagging groceries or pumping gas to pay for your ride and gas. Does anyone remember what they paid for gas in high school? garrell
Never did much street racing. Saw a couple pedestrians killed during an illegal street race in Ft. Lauderdale, Fl when I was in high school and that convinced me that any racing I did was going to be on the track.... and it was, especially during my college years when I had my '69 RoadRunner.

When I was in high school I paid $.19 a gallon on a regular basis. When I graduated from college and had my 66 427 Vette I used to put Sunoco 260 in that for $.29 a gallon. Now I'm putting diesel in my truck for $3.73 a gallon.

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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
i bet the 57 ford was a police interceptor engine, can't believe you still have the paper work, back then no one thought about such things. did you ever tote canolopes in from a field or pull corn on the farm like i did?
My dad was a dairy farmer with 160 acres under cultivation in northern Illinois, so we raised corn, oats, soybeans and alfalfa. For my $20 a week I had to get up every morning and milk the cows before going to school and again at night after coming home from football or basketball practice. Saturday was always a full work day as well as Sunday chores. And every day, seven days a week during the summer months, was required in the fields to plant, cultivate and harvest.

That may sound a bit odious but growing up on the farm was great. While I was expected to work very hard for my earnings, my "time off" (after milking every night of the week) was fully mine and I was not restricted in any way as to what I could do during those hours. As best I can describe it, my parents treated me as an adult.

The other great advantage to growing up on a farm in those days was that the local police were very lenient towards farm boys and farm families. I was allowed to drive my motorcycle from the age of 13 and my cars when I was 14 and 15, well before I had a license. The "deal" was that I could drive as long as I was going to or from school or a school related function or to/from church related events. Oh, and I had to maintain all speed limits and rules of the road.

I doubt anything like that goes on anywhere any more...with the possible exception of rural areas of places like Montana, Wyoming or Idaho.

Even the hard work and long hours on the farm turned out to be advantageous. I hated it at the time but it taught me great lessons on how to apply myself and keep my head above water financially later in life.
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 11:11 AM
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My first car was a '53 Chevy 2-door post. Dad loaned me $75 to buy it.

During the last two years of high school, I fixed, then blew up the 216... so I rebuilt a 58 235 and put it in, and added a floor shifter. I also painted it '65 Chevy seafoam green, which did not turn out shiny... but I was proud!

As was popular then, I pulled the front bumper, and painted the rear rims half black, half white, like a drag car. :-) My pet name was "Poison Ivy".
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
My dad was a dairy farmer with 160 acres under cultivation in northern Illinois, so we raised corn, oats, soybeans and alfalfa. For my $20 a week I had to get up every morning and milk the cows before going to school and again at night after coming home from football or basketball practice. Saturday was always a full work day as well as Sunday chores. And every day, seven days a week during the summer months, was required in the fields to plant, cultivate and harvest.

That may sound a bit odious but growing up on the farm was great. While I was expected to work very hard for my earnings, my "time off" (after milking every night of the week) was fully mine and I was not restricted in any way as to what I could do during those hours. As best I can describe it, my parents treated me as an adult.

The other great advantage to growing up on a farm in those days was that the local police were very lenient towards farm boys and farm families. I was allowed to drive my motorcycle from the age of 13 and my cars when I was 14 and 15, well before I had a license. The "deal" was that I could drive as long as I was going to or from school or a school related function or to/from church related events. Oh, and I had to maintain all speed limits and rules of the road.

I doubt anything like that goes on anywhere any more...with the possible exception of rural areas of places like Montana, Wyoming or Idaho.

Even the hard work and long hours on the farm turned out to be advantageous. I hated it at the time but it taught me great lessons on how to apply myself and keep my head above water financially later in life.

We didn't have a farm but the homestead was in farming community. Hard to imagine now with twenty houses an acre covering all those fields I use to see covered with califlower. It was such a good time, I rode my mini bikes and motorcycle all over those fields and levys. I'd walk out the back door with my 22 rifle and go shooting. I drove my truck MANY miles before it was licensed with no windows (top chopped and couldn't afford them) and no fenders or bed! I would sand it for five minutes and then drive it up and down the farm roads for a half an hour.

My dad late in his life wrote on a photo of us with one of our horses after a parade "Sangrala", and I agree.

Brian
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:44 AM
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High school car was the 72 Nova that I'm restoring right now and a 98 tahoe that I was lucky enough to have my mom let me drive when the nova wasn't running
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Old 12-22-2011, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
Great cars and great stories, no one has mentioned going to the drag strip or street racing. I fessed up to illegal racing and an even more illegal part night job, come on and come clean. I can't believe no one has mentioned bagging groceries or pumping gas to pay for your ride and gas. Does anyone remember what they paid for gas in high school? garrell
In 1968 I remember driving from my home town to another town 10 miles away to buy gas for 19.9 a gallon. They were charging 24.9 in my home town. I worked 4 jobs one summer. In a gas station, on a golf course, on a sod farm, and in a fast food joint.
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Old 12-22-2011, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by K72Nova
High school car was the 72 Nova that I'm restoring right now and a 98 tahoe that I was lucky enough to have my mom let me drive when the nova wasn't running
I had a '63 Dodge former squad car that had a 383 with 440 heads and intakes and a 4 barrel carb. It had positraction, and would just scream. The only car in my school I couldn't beat was a '66 Corvette with a 427
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 04:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garrell.770
Great cars and great stories, no one has mentioned going to the drag strip or street racing. I fessed up to illegal racing and an even more illegal part night job, come on and come clean. I can't believe no one has mentioned bagging groceries or pumping gas to pay for your ride and gas. Does anyone remember what they paid for gas in high school? garrell
Went to New England drag way fairly regular. It is in Epping NH. When I got my license and first car gas was about .50 a gallon and went up during the first "gas crisis". In most places they would not sell you more than a few gallons at a time and the price went up to .75. I remember seeing the lines with 50 cars waiting to get gas. People were turning there cars off at red lights to try to save fuel. It was good for the companies that sold starters lol.
Fuuny thing is the school parking lot was full of the cars people would die for today.
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2011, 04:42 PM
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In high school I delivered papers, shoveled snow, mowed lawns, bagged groceries, worked as a soda-jerk at a root beer stand, and worked at a Deep Rock gas station where gas was 29 cents a gallon.

Once I stopped building models, and got my car... what money didn't go into maintaining and cruising the car, was saved to go to the U.S. Nationals each fall.

Ahhhh. The good old days! {:-)
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Old 12-22-2011, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by T-bucket23
Went to New England drag way fairly regular. It is in Epping NH. When I got my license and first car gas was about .50 a gallon and went up during the first "gas crisis". In most places they would not sell you more than a few gallons at a time and the price went up to .75. I remember seeing the lines with 50 cars waiting to get gas. People were turning there cars off at red lights to try to save fuel. It was good for the companies that sold starters lol.
Fuuny thing is the school parking lot was full of the cars people would die for today.
I LOVED the gas crisis. I got to own cars I only dreamt about. My job and girlfriend were so close, I hardly used any gas. BUT, at age 18, in 1974, I could buy my 1st of many Corvettes. A flared 64 roadster with a fresh 365HP 327 for $775
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