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Old 03-16-2012, 04:00 PM
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What does "383 stroker" mean?

OK, I've been around enough to know 383 stroker is some version of a standard displacement engine with the piston stroke changed to increase the displacement. What I don't know. . is this a common term for what kind of engine? 327 chev? 350 chev? And does it mean the stroke is changed with a new crank, new rods? both? I'm looking at buying (actually been looking at buying for months ) a 32 where the engine is listed as "383 stroker"

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Old 03-16-2012, 04:39 PM
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383 stroker, generally 400 cube crank, stuffed in a 350 block. More stroke, more torque. Many variations from there.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:44 PM
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It's a 350 block with a crank that has a stroke of 3.750 vs. the stoke stroke of 3.48. You can get them with either 5.7 inch rods or 6 inch rods. The block has to be clearnanced for the additional stroke. Nowadays most 383 strokers are built using aftermarket cranks and rods. The increased stroke produces more torque.

http://www.383stroker.com/
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:51 PM
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To get into how it was come up with.
For starters, rod lenth doesn't change the stroke lenth or cubic inches.
With that out of the way, lets start.
Guys back in time was looking for a way to get more cubic inches out of a 350. So they got a crankshaft out of a 400 small block.
Now, this had one problem, the 400's crankshaft has a 2.650 main journal size and a 350 has a 2.450 main journal size. They simply had the mains ground down to 2.450 so it would drop right in to the 350 block. Now, what the 400 and 350 had in common was, the compression height of the pistons was the same at 1.560, the rod lenth was different. The 350 used a 5.703 inch rod, the 400 used a shorter 5.565 inch rod. So they installed a 350 piston on the 400 rod, and since the compression height of the pistons were the same, this brought it right back into specs. It's called a "stroker" because a longer stroke crank was installed that increased cubic inches.
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Old 03-16-2012, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleVision
To get into how it was come up with.
For starters, rod lenth doesn't change the stroke lenth or cubic inches.
With that out of the way, lets start.
Guys back in time was looking for a way to get more cubic inches out of a 350. So they got a crankshaft out of a 400 small block.
Now, this had one problem, the 400's crankshaft has a 2.650 main journal size and a 350 has a 2.450 main journal size. They simply had the mains ground down to 2.450 so it would drop right in to the 350 block. Now, what the 400 and 350 had in common was, the compression height of the pistons was the same at 1.560, the rod lenth was different. The 350 used a 5.703 inch rod, the 400 used a shorter 5.565 inch rod. So they installed a 350 piston on the 400 rod, and since the compression height of the pistons were the same, this brought it right back into specs. It's called a "stroker" because a longer stroke crank was installed that increased cubic inches.
Ayuh,.... Excellent explanation,...

I'll only throw in there that is also takes a .030 over-bore to reach the 383 inches...
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Old 03-16-2012, 06:46 PM
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Thanks Bond. I'm gettin' old and my memory is showin' it.
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Old 03-16-2012, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bondo
Ayuh,.... Excellent explanation,...

I'll only throw in there that is also takes a .030 over-bore to reach the 383 inches...
Thanks all for the quick and detailed response. Now if I have to rebuild the engine at some time in the future it will be fun trying to get the right crank, rods, pistions, bearings !!!

The seller claims 450hp. I wish he left it 350 ci. and about 150hp less. I can get in just as much trouble in a 300hp highboy as a 450hp one.
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Old 03-16-2012, 07:32 PM
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You won't necessarily have to buy a new crank or connecting rods. Those really only need to be replaced if there is something wrong. You may even be able to reuse the pistons if the block doesn't need to bored again. Even if any of those parts did need to be replaced you can find 383 cranks and pistons easily through mail order companies like Summit, Jegs, etc. and can probably order them just as easily through local parts houses just as easily.

As far as it being a "stroker" I kinda think that term belongs in the automotive history books being a "stroker" really doesn't say much. As far as I'm concerned, it's a 383. Calling it a stroker just sounds cool. Suppose you have a 327 (same bore as a 350 or 383) and you put a 350 crank in it. You stroked your 327 to a 350 so does that mean it's a stroker or just a 350? Or what if it was a new block and a new crank built as a 383? I just think it's an outdated term.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:43 PM
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There are two version of 383. The first one is a home brew version where a 4.00" 350 block is bored out 30 over by 3.75" stroke from a 400sbc.
A 383 home brew is really bored and stoked.
The second version is a crate 383 from over the counter Chevy. That is a 4.00" bore by 3.8" stroke. It uses 5.7" connecting rods.
This is a true stroker where the bore stays the same.
A 307 is a true stroker from a 283. from a 3.00" to a 3.25"

Last edited by lg1969; 03-16-2012 at 10:56 PM.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:59 PM
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In the words of Tim Taylor its "A 350 small block bored 30 over with a 400 crank".
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:07 PM
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You can say that a 350 is a stroker motor.
The interesting part is the 4.00" block was stroked 4 times, from a 302, 327, 350, and now 383.

Last edited by lg1969; 03-16-2012 at 11:14 PM.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:43 AM
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Not that a pic means a lot, just thought I'd share. This is the engine in question that the seller says is a "383 stroker" He says 450hp with dual quads, no mention of cam
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Old 03-17-2012, 02:03 PM
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I know I'm not one of the Chevy "gurus" around here, but having built hundreds of 383s over the years, I do have some pertinent input.

First, when refering to the small block Chevy "383", the word "stroker" is redundant. That is, no need to say it since there were no "factory" 383s. If it's a small block Chevy, and 383 CID, it IS a "stroker". And the 3.8" stroke being used with "standard" blocks has been around a long time, as well, making a "412" at a .030" over bore.

GREAT combination. When properly executed, IMO, the BEST small block "street performance" engine using "stock" parts. We started doing it when the 400 blocks wre dropping "out" (not the best block Chevy ever came up with... Just stretched TOO far, IMO), it seemed like a waste throwing those nice nodular cranks away. Since we'd (engine builders) been been using 4" stroke cranks in 389s since the early '60s, and 283 cranks in 327 blocks ("301", the "original" Chevy 302, along with the .125" over 283), etc., making cranks "fit" where they weren't intended, it seemed like the logical thing to do., I believe the first one I had my "fingers" in was in summer of '71. It went in a '66 'vette and really made an impression! Dick Latona (RIP) in San Bernardino ground the mains.

We shipped a 383 to Holland for a Cobra "kit car". The man said he wanted 500 HP. I tried to explain the issues with driving a 500 HP car, but he wanted what he wanted... So, he got a 500 HP 383. It took he and his brother a couple years of "light" practice before they were really comfortable driving the car "in traffic". Now they LOVE it. At the old "Dutch Grand Prix" track, they open it for street cars and ammetuers. They had a BALL! And the car "cracked" 180 on the long straight (3.23 gears, OD). Later that day, it "broke" the brake in a Mustang 500 HP dyno. Argh! Argh! Humor... Those Dutch boys are getting a real "taste" for American V8s!

We've also learned, if building a real performance version, it's best to use either a Chevy nodular crank or an aftermarket forging. The circle track crowd had us use the "cast steel" versions when they first arrived (CHEAP). They failed quick and often. Beat #2 and 4 mains out (flexing like crazy). We keep the imported castings ONLY for 'pickup" and show car stuff (5,000 RPM "limit"), not for anything remotely serious.

The "flip side" is the 377. After we started building all these torquey street motors, we had parts "left over". Like a 400 block, a 350 crank... HHHHMMM... My first 377 build was in '75. Talk about a rev MONSTER! The big bore really woke up those 2.055" valved heads! We started using the 2.08" valves because they just kept flowing more. Amazing what boire size can "do" for a cylinder head...

Okay, I've rambled about the past enough. Just know, even though I'm a "Pontiac guy", I have some really good "war stories" involving some of my small blocks, especially the 383s and 400s. You'll never hear ME "bad mouth" the small block... except that MAYBE, there's just too damn many of them "out there"... Wonder why... (:-

Jim
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Old 03-17-2012, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. P-Body
I know I'm not one of the Chevy "gurus" around here, but having built hundreds of 383s over the years, I do have some pertinent input.

First, when refering to the small block Chevy "383", the word "stroker" is redundant. That is, no need to say it since there were no "factory" 383s. If it's a small block Chevy, and 383 CID, it IS a "stroker". And the 3.8" stroke being used with "standard" blocks has been around a long time, as well, making a "412" at a .030" over bore.

GREAT combination. When properly executed, IMO, the BEST small block "street performance" engine using "stock" parts. We started doing it when the 400 blocks wre dropping "out" (not the best block Chevy ever came up with... Just stretched TOO far, IMO), it seemed like a waste throwing those nice nodular cranks away. Since we'd (engine builders) been been using 4" stroke cranks in 389s since the early '60s, and 283 cranks in 327 blocks ("301", the "original" Chevy 302, along with the .125" over 283), etc., making cranks "fit" where they weren't intended, it seemed like the logical thing to do., I believe the first one I had my "fingers" in was in summer of '71. It went in a '66 'vette and really made an impression! Dick Latona (RIP) in San Bernardino ground the mains.

We shipped a 383 to Holland for a Cobra "kit car". The man said he wanted 500 HP. I tried to explain the issues with driving a 500 HP car, but he wanted what he wanted... So, he got a 500 HP 383. It took he and his brother a couple years of "light" practice before they were really comfortable driving the car "in traffic". Now they LOVE it. At the old "Dutch Grand Prix" track, they open it for street cars and ammetuers. They had a BALL! And the car "cracked" 180 on the long straight (3.23 gears, OD). Later that day, it "broke" the brake in a Mustang 500 HP dyno. Argh! Argh! Humor... Those Dutch boys are getting a real "taste" for American V8s!

We've also learned, if building a real performance version, it's best to use either a Chevy nodular crank or an aftermarket forging. The circle track crowd had us use the "cast steel" versions when they first arrived (CHEAP). They failed quick and often. Beat #2 and 4 mains out (flexing like crazy). We keep the imported castings ONLY for 'pickup" and show car stuff (5,000 RPM "limit"), not for anything remotely serious.

The "flip side" is the 377. After we started building all these torquey street motors, we had parts "left over". Like a 400 block, a 350 crank... HHHHMMM... My first 377 build was in '75. Talk about a rev MONSTER! The big bore really woke up those 2.055" valved heads! We started using the 2.08" valves because they just kept flowing more. Amazing what boire size can "do" for a cylinder head...

Okay, I've rambled about the past enough. Just know, even though I'm a "Pontiac guy", I have some really good "war stories" involving some of my small blocks, especially the 383s and 400s. You'll never hear ME "bad mouth" the small block... except that MAYBE, there's just too damn many of them "out there"... Wonder why... (:-

Jim
I've put just a few engines together in my day, but info like this reminds me that I don't know squat compared to what you guys know about engines. Great historical info on the origin of 383.
So would the seller's claim of 450hp with dual quads and some sort of mild cam be realistic?
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsaengine
I've put just a few engines together in my day, but info like this reminds me that I don't know squat compared to what you guys know about engines. Great historical info on the origin of 383.
So would the seller's claim of 450hp with dual quads and some sort of mild cam be realistic?
Ayuh,... It's Not Unrealistic,.....
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