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Old 04-20-2008, 12:19 PM
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What is a good teach yourself welding book?

Im looking for a good welding book to learn how to weld. MIG, TIG, ARC, and OXY. I have all the welders except tig but someday , but cant really use any of them that well haha. Is their a book that will show you what to do, what settings/pressures to set the welder at, patterns to do, techniques, metal thickness, etc all that stuff. If its a specific book for MIG or a book that covers them all, either way. You guys know of any good ones??

Last edited by schnitz; 04-21-2008 at 05:45 PM. Reason: Other.
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Old 04-20-2008, 12:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warrant
Im looking for a good welding book to learn how to weld. MIG, TIG, ARC, and OXY. I have all the welders except tig but someday , but cant really use any of them that well haha. Is their a book that will show you what to do, what settings/pressures to set the welder at, patterns to do, techniques, metal thickness, etc all that stuff. If its a specific book for MIG or a book that covers them all, either way. You guys know of any good ones??

Best teacher I've found is experience. What works for one person (stance, position, wire speed, etc..) doesn't always work for the next guy. Heck, I've noticed that my welding skills improved just by switching to an auto-darkening helmet. Practice makes perfect is very true in this case.

I hadn't even turned on my 220 stick welder in over a year, got to toying with it yesterday, and was right back to where I had been in terms of skills by this morning. Still room for improvement, but that comes simply by doing it.


As far as a book to learn from, not a clue. But you could maybe hit up a local technical school and see what a teacher there would recommend.


In a while, Chet.
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Old 04-20-2008, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schnitz
Best teacher I've found is experience. What works for one person (stance, position, wire speed, etc..) doesn't always work for the next guy. Heck, I've noticed that my welding skills improved just by switching to an auto-darkening helmet. Practice makes perfect is very true in this case.
Agreed, a book could get me in the right direction though, really dont have whole lot of time to take a class, I have a friend thats going to show me some things to but he is also very busy. A book could show me things what and what not to do. and I can practice from that, gain experience, and see what does and doesn't work
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Old 04-20-2008, 12:50 PM
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Having sold welding equiptment for years, you might want to go to your local welding distributor and ask what kind of videos are available. Its alot easier to watch what your are supposed to do, than to read about it, and then do it. All the machine mfg.s have starter videos for all the machines they make. Im sure the distributor has a pile of them somewhere that they would love to find a good home for. They should also sell the books your looking for. I think the best book is "Metals and how to weld them" by T.B. Jefferson ... published by Welding Engineer Publications, Inc. Good luck, and enjoy the process. And like mentioned before, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE
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Old 04-20-2008, 03:10 PM
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https://ssl.lincolnelectric.com/linc....asp?prodnum=L

this is the book we used in my welding class. book is ok but if you can take a class you'd really be better off.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:22 PM
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getting a good weldor to guide you = the best, by far.

otherwise google

miller ask andy
and there is another one, i don't remember the name. but its hobart something or other. just read there for a few days. you will learn a lot.
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Old 04-20-2008, 07:36 PM
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Hands on is the best way to learn.Ask some questions,Do some welding,Show us the pics,And we maybe able to help you out.
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Old 04-20-2008, 10:25 PM
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"Performance welding" by Richard Finch is by far the best text I have ever seen for the beginner and the pro! During the nearly forty years I have been doing this I have seen many welders, FAR TOO many, that could make a beautiful weld bead but hardly had a clue as to what was actually happening during the process. There is far more to welding than just laying down the weld bead and most of the books I have seen do not go into nearly enough detail about heat damage, induced stress and warpage to the base metal which is at least as important as the weld itself, it does not matter how strong a weld is if the surrounding base metal is weakened in the process. Finch goes into detail not only about how to perform a welding task but he explains what is happening and gives the operator the right info he needs to make a quality weld. He explains the proper methods and tools of various welding processes and exposes a lot of the age old myths and just plain bad habits that have been the cause of many failures. He covers proper weld prep, preheat, stress relieving and selection of the proper filler metals. He covers Stick, MIG, TIG and even gas welding of various steel alloys and the Aluminum alloys and how to select the right method and filler for the job. Teaching yourself to weld without proper guidance can be an exercise in futility and getting the wrong guidance can be even worse but if you learn the basics before you start and try to gain an understanding about what is happening during the process you will be off to a good start.
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Old 04-20-2008, 11:04 PM
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Experience is the best teacher. A buddy who welds is about the next in line. Then a real class. Then videos. Then a book. Welding is not something that a book can teach you to do (IMHO). Yes..it might recommend what rod (or wire) and what gas to use, but you can get that here.

Pick up some scrap metal and weld all day. Weld some more the next weekend. Try different positions and types of weld (fillet, flat, uphill, etc.) You have a welder..go for it. The best way to learn.
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Old 04-20-2008, 11:48 PM
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I have to respectfully disagree, studying a book such as performance welding and gaining a good understanding of the basics should be the first step BEFORE attempting to learn the actual welding procedure! A person really needs to know the proper way to start any welding process, they need to know what is happening during the process and why certain things happen the way they do- it will make the learning process a lot easier. Unless he is a certified pro getting a buddy to teach you may or may not be a good idea, and in fact could be the worst way to learn, since learning the wrong way or picking up bad habits from the start has ruined more welders than anything else and there are a heck of a lot more unskilled welders out there than really good ones so make sure your teacher really knows what he is doing! A good welding class is the best way to go but unfortunately some schools are a lot better than others and a lot of schools just turn out rod burners and not real welders so if you decide to take classes check them out first. Whatever route you decide to take do yourself a big favor and learn to weld the right way, learn how to WELD not just how to stick two pieces of metal together!
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Old 04-21-2008, 01:21 PM
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A lot of years ago I went to a stick welding class for my job - I had to be a Navy certified welder so I could either build or repair motors and pumps. For 6 weeks I went to class for a couple of hours every day then went and burned pounds and pounds of 3/8" E7016 rod making little steel plates into bigger steel plates. I got my cert, made a few welds then got a promotion to "boss" and probably haven't laid down a half dozen stick weld since. But with that said, with a very short reacquaintance time, probably still could weld a very good bead. Class/book plus OJT equals the learning process. I finally bought a little home shop MIG w/gas welder. A bit of a different story. My welds looked like....well, pigeon poop. I took a $200, 6 week MIG course - went to their classes, read their book, then, again went and made big pieces out of little ones in their shop. Can I MIG weld - well, it isn't pigeon poop any longer, and from what I can see, my MIG welds are about as good as most. Could they be better - probably, but I don't weld enough to keep my skill levels high.

Read, class, weld, then weld some more, then when you get good, weld even more
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Old 04-21-2008, 02:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warrant
Im looking for a good welding book to learn how to weld. MIG, TIG, ARC, and OXY. I have all the welders except tig but someday , but cant really use any of them that well haha. Is their a book that will show you what to do, what settings/pressures to set the welder at, patterns to do, techniques, metal thickness, etc all that stuff. If its a specific book for MIG or a book that covers them all, either way. You guys know of any good ones??

If you have a stick machine you do have a tig, Hook up a dry rid and scratch start it. I find allot of info on Millers site under their tech section.
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Old 04-21-2008, 07:31 PM
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I agree with Brian B. Practice alot but before you start read up on the safty side. I have been welding for years and still do stupid thigs like welding in a t-shirt with short sleeves. Hey you know the deal a friend stops by and asks you to weld somthing up. You say no problem and get started. The next day your arms are flaming hot. Weld burn is worse than sun burn and does not show up right away. An old leather jacket works great. If you rember to put it on.
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Old 04-23-2008, 06:11 PM
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How should I go about getting scrap metal to practice on? Can I go to a local place and will they like sell it by the pound or? How much does it go for? what can I expect to get with says 20 bucks?
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Old 04-23-2008, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warrant
How should I go about getting scrap metal to practice on? Can I go to a local place and will they like sell it by the pound or? How much does it go for? what can I expect to get with says 20 bucks?

Local scrap yards should have it. In my area, I can get it from a place called Wausau Steel for around $.25 a pound, or I raid the scrap bin at the shop at work for the same price. But, that's my area, others may be a tad higher.


In a while, Chet.
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