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Old 04-26-2005, 04:35 PM
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Whats blueprinting and balancing?

Hey again,
what does it mean when an engine is blueprinted and balanced?


Thanks a lot,


Mike

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Old 04-26-2005, 10:07 PM
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Blueprinting means to match all the components of a motor. You place all the rings in the cylinders and make sure all the gaps are perfect and go from there every part is checked to make sure it is a perfect as it can be. Balancing is in a way an extension or blueprinting, you weigh every rid and piston and make sure they all weigh the same you spin the crank and remove weight to balance it. On the heads you clean all the ports of any casting slag, weigh the valves and measure the valve springs to make sure they are all the same then CC each chamber to make sure they are all the same.

In the end you are really just checking to make sure there are no imperfections and that every cylinder will make the same HP. If you had FI you would flow each injector or order a matched set again to make sure every cylinder gets the same amount of fuel and there fore will make the same amount of power. Plus with everything balanced the motor will want to tear itself apart less at higher RPM's.

Now this is really a basic quick overview but I hope you it is what you were looking for.
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Old 04-27-2005, 02:54 PM
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oversimplified but true.....

thats it in a nut shell......it $costs$ to have the work done...you can do a lot yourself and save $BIG$ $BUCKS$


Tazz


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Old 04-27-2005, 10:38 PM
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Thanks a lot

Thanks guys, totally different from what I expected it to be. I thought for balancing they'd balance the engine perfectly left to right up and down. LOL!

Thanks,


Mike
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Old 04-28-2005, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tm454
...you can do a lot yourself and save $BIG$ $BUCKS$
Tazz,

I'd be interested in a more detailed post on what the back yard mechanic might reasonably be able to do...and how to do it. Also, if you still need to take your engine to a shop for some of the work, wouldn't they balk at not having done ALL the specs and ALL the balancing? Seems like they'd have to have a lot of faith in the owner. I would think they might hesitate to stand behind the work (especially if they had a guy like me trying to do some of it.) I don't think this has been covered in detail in our knowledge base so it might be good to hear the experiences of others who have done this in their own shops.

Dewey
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Old 04-28-2005, 08:13 AM
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Engine assembly

Well a fellow can be careful to do a good job of assembly but you do need stuff like THIS to do the job.. ..the difference in a blueprinted motor is in the care of assembly..

OMT
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Old 04-28-2005, 08:23 AM
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b&b

The balance deal has to do with getting all the rotating parts to weigh the same and figuring out what is called a bob weight then spinning the crank with this amount of weight attached and drilling or adding weight to get the crank to balance out with this weight....

The blueprinting has to do with recording all the assembled sizes of the engine. I have a excell sheet i made with all the sizes i record when i build an engine. The customer get a copy when the engine if finished and i also keep a copy for my records....

Keith
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Old 04-30-2005, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
Tazz,

I'd be interested in a more detailed post on what the back yard mechanic might reasonably be able to do...
Dewey

One trick is to match the lighest piston with the heaviest con rod, and the lightest con rod with the heaviest piston, and so on and so on so they all weigh as close to the same as possible.
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Old 05-08-2005, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
Tazz,

I'd be interested in a more detailed post on what the back yard mechanic might reasonably be able to do...and how to do it. Also, if you still need to take your engine to a shop for some of the work, wouldn't they balk at not having done ALL the specs and ALL the balancing? Seems like they'd have to have a lot of faith in the owner. I would think they might hesitate to stand behind the work (especially if they had a guy like me trying to do some of it.) I don't think this has been covered in detail in our knowledge base so it might be good to hear the experiences of others who have done this in their own shops.

Dewey
It is always a bit of a stickey wicket to do part of your own work and then expect the machine shop to do the rest and stand behind it. With a few special tools you can do much if not most of this your self. A good scale is all you need to static balance all the engine parts. A ring end gap grinder to set the ring gaps. Plasiguage to check all the bearing clearances. A good diegrinder to clean things up and remove metal for balancing. A degree wheel to degree in the cam. You will still need to get the dynamic balance done at the machine shop
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Old 05-14-2005, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k-star
The balance deal has to do with getting all the rotating parts to weigh the same and figuring out what is called a bob weight then spinning the crank with this amount of weight attached and drilling or adding weight to get the crank to balance out with this weight....

The blueprinting has to do with recording all the assembled sizes of the engine. I have a excell sheet i made with all the sizes i record when i build an engine. The customer get a copy when the engine if finished and i also keep a copy for my records....

Keith
Could you post the excel sheet so I can have a copy?
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Old 05-14-2005, 06:18 PM
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whats the running price for a blueprint and balance on a longblock?

i'd really like to have it professionally done just for peace of mind once I get my motor completely together.
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Old 05-15-2005, 03:48 PM
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buy a GOOD scale...

a digital scale that will give you the diff. in grams....weigh all the pistons....note the lightest one and start grinding the skirt on all the others to match that weight. Do the same with the rods...find the lightest one and grind all the others to that weight. CK the crank with a digital micromiter to see each surface is the same and ck the brngs with a crush gage to see each brng is not to tight on the crank.


Tazz


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Old 05-21-2005, 09:23 PM
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you can also chamfer all oil holes on the crank for next to nothing in time and effort.

feel around the cam bearing journals, if the edge is sharp, chamfer those too.

remove ALL the oil galley plugs before you take it to the machine shop, they might not. be sure to note position of same.

micrometer measure everything and do the math. if the math isn't right, neither is your motor.

cheap insurance. excluding the cost of a good set of mics. but you buy them once, and you have them for every motor you want to build.
at least thats how i justified them......
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