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Old 01-16-2008, 05:04 PM
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What's the Precision on a Drill Press?

I have been having problems with a Jet drill press that I purchased. They sent me one in the mail after proclaiming that they tested the machine. Well, the chuck once again is wobbling. However, I drilled some holes with some hole saws and took measurements with a dial caliper. Could anyone tell me if these measurements are standard for a nice drill press?

For a 1" hole saw (1" nominal), the drilled hole measured 1.020".
The 7/8" hole saw (.875" nominal) bit itself measured .850" and the hole measured .880".

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Old 01-16-2008, 05:27 PM
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Hole saws always shake around and make the hole a little bigger. Those figures seem fine to me. And I worked as an outboard mechanic for 20 years so I drilled a lot of holes with hole saws.
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Old 01-16-2008, 06:07 PM
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Does Jet have you believing a wobbling chuck is acceptable as long as you find the hole quality acceptable?

Speedy is right about hole saws - they aren't very deadly.

I have a Taiwan 14 drill press - made in Taiwan and sold under 14 different names. The chuck wobbled. So, I bought a Jacobs chuck from Grainger and no more complaints from me. But, that was 30 years ago when I think even the cheap stuff was made better then the sfuff from mainland China is today.

Put a six inch piece of half inch drill rod in your press and dial indicate it at the bottom end. I'd be returning the press if I saw more than .0015/.002" TIR. I think you can get that accuracy from presses less expensive than Jet.

Having said that, let me put this into prospective. It's a drill press, not a CNC Mill. Punching and center drilling your holes will help the accuracy of your drilling.
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Old 01-16-2008, 07:37 PM
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I don't think I have ever seen a hole saw cut a true hole.(Never the same sizes as the hole saw.)
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Old 01-16-2008, 07:38 PM
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Dugg ,I agree thats why I waited till I could afford the one I wanted from Sears and don't regret the$300.00 I spent on it. The chuck doesn't wobble at all.And after about 10 years it is still in good working order.
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Old 01-17-2008, 10:18 AM
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I'm a "closet machinists" of sources, and the info your getting here is correct. There are too many variables to try to gage the accuracy of your drill press by measuring the holes you get with a hole saw. "IF" I was you, I'd get a dial gage with a magnetic base and measure the "run-out" on the chuck of this press. Once you got some figures on that I'd call JET company directly and talk with their service dept and ask what you can expect (run-out) from a factory new machine. That should give you an idea of the accuracy of your machine. My $0.02 anyway, Good Luck!

Last edited by 11echo; 01-18-2008 at 07:57 AM.
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Old 01-17-2008, 12:13 PM
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My Craftsman has no visible runout. It will holesaw to a couple thousandths of the saw size. If you look at the chuck while it is running and the sides look fuzzy or blurred, thats to much runout even for general shop work. Always punch and predrill your centers. Set up your work to have the least amount of quill extended you can. Finish each hole without moving the work if at all possible. Drill a 1/4" hole first before using a holesaw. Have the piece firmly anchored prior to drilling or cutting with a holesaw. Time is cheap compared to emergency room visits. Replace the drill with a solid rod (I use drill blank) to prevent wallowing of the hole. I modify my saws so that they seat firmly on the drive when the pins are engaged. Any thing you can do to eliminate runout, chatter and vibration produces a cleaner hole. Clean the saw regularly while cutting and use plenty of lubrication. Run the saw at the recommended speed. Slower is better than faster. Discard any saw that is dull, has teeth missing or has been involved in a bind that made the work move.
If I found a Jet tool that was made when the Chinese were still trying to get established in the USA, like pre 1990, I still wouldn't buy it. Like I said, no more Jet tools.
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Old 01-17-2008, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 61bone
My Craftsman has no visible runout. It will holesaw to a couple thousandths of the saw size. If you look at the chuck while it is running and the sides look fuzzy or blurred, thats to much runout even for general shop work. Always punch and predrill your centers. Set up your work to have the least amount of quill extended you can. Finish each hole without moving the work if at all possible. Drill a 1/4" hole first before using a holesaw. Have the piece firmly anchored prior to drilling or cutting with a holesaw. Time is cheap compared to emergency room visits. Replace the drill with a solid rod (I use drill blank) to prevent wallowing of the hole. I modify my saws so that they seat firmly on the drive when the pins are engaged. Any thing you can do to eliminate runout, chatter and vibration produces a cleaner hole. Clean the saw regularly while cutting and use plenty of lubrication. Run the saw at the recommended speed. Slower is better than faster. Discard any saw that is dull, has teeth missing or has been involved in a bind that made the work move.
If I found a Jet tool that was made when the Chinese were still trying to get established in the USA, like pre 1990, I still wouldn't buy it. Like I said, no more Jet tools.
You just replayed a lot of my high school shop class. And Rich Masin is still my favorite teacher. Thanks for the reminders and the unintentional trip down memory lane.
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Old 01-18-2008, 11:58 AM
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.0015 to .002 total indicator run out is asking a lot of a Chinese made drill press. when you compound the run out in the spindle bearings, if it even has spindle bearings at all, the run out in where the chuck is attached to the taper shank, the run out in the jaws of the chuck it's self and the run out of whatever you may be spinning. i would say that .005 total indicator run out is acceptable, at least to me.

if you need to get more accurate take the suggestions above drill a pilot. maybe get a bigger arbor. i don't know what kind of arbor you have the hole saw on, but if its the dinky one that came with it, theres room for improvement.

another thing to consider is the fact that you are measuring with dial calipers. thats a great way to introduce error. I've used lots of dial calipers, some were good down to a few thousandths others were out up .010 in some spots. if the calipers your using were made in china i wouldn't trust them to measure down past + or - .005 and thats wishful thinking.

if you really want to make accurately sized and located holes, your barking up the wrong tree with a drill press and a hole saw. what you need is a good milling machine an edge finder and an offset boring head. then you in the can expect to get down + or - a couple thousandths on size and location.
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Old 01-22-2008, 05:56 AM
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I have to agree with the others. A hole saw is not a precision item and is meant to drill a rough size clearance hole. What I would as been suggested by others is to measure the run out with something of a know dimension such as a rod that's been measured at several points around it's circumference mounted in the chuck and measured with a dial indicator as you turn the chuck by hand.
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Old 01-23-2008, 11:24 AM
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You might be able to get the .001-.002 run out in the spindle. With the cheapo chucks I don't think you can even get close unless you want to tap the part in with and indicator. Even so the bigger problem is the slop in the column to spindle bore. If the spindle is fully retracted it appears to be pretty solid untill you put an indicator on it and try to move it around. I saw a Sears Good one that I could measure the slop with a scale, no indicator needed. Just extend the spindle and try to wiggle it around, you will surprise yourself. I'd pick the tightest one but they are still POS in my mind. Most of the HF and other cheap drill press will have considerable play thus making them useless for a milling machine except for maybe wood. It's a case of trying to use the tool for something it's not designed for.

My take would be to get the biggest drill press practical and use it at short spindle extensions. You will get less wobble.

If you can get within a 32nd with a hole saw give yourself a pat. They are for making a big holes cheaply and that they do well. Just not precision.

If you want something a bit more precise you can go up to a drill/mill. HF has a couple that actually do a pretty fair job on light duty stuff. The larger one is frequently converted to low cost CNC and does amazingly well for the price. A knowledgeable machinist can do some remarkable stuff with one of these.
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Old 01-23-2008, 11:41 AM
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One of the things not mentioned is to use the drill bits with a morse taper shank..Also I get some decent results by drilling the hole a bit undersize and then reaming it to the final dimension..

I have one of the HF drill presses and it works for me but then I am not expecting it to do any milling..And I am building chassis not motors so the degree of accuracy of a mill is not required..

Would be nice to have a mill though..

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Old 01-23-2008, 11:48 AM
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You will never control the size or shape of a hole saw. A drill press just drill holes, not accurate holes. You would have to ream to an accurate size.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:15 AM
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Wow a 5 yr old thread. Someone must have done a search....for a change. haha

Still it is informative.

Drill presses are for quickly drilling holes and work great for hole saws. Don't expect either to be of the accuracy of a mill and boring holes. For the vast majority of wotk they are fine even with the awfull runout in the spindles. It's pretty amazing what you can do with a POS drill press if you can get a good center punch mark and use a center drill first.

Dial calipers...60 years ago I was taught to call them "very nears" because that was as close as you could get with them.....near. I have at lease 3 operating "verynears" none read the same from 0 to max size. I also have a series of micrometers. These read to their tolerance levels. Even today you need the best of "mics" both inside and outside plus the special ones for threads, sheet, small holes and bores.

When compared to today's coordinate measuring machines even "mics" become only "very close" at best.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhavyamachinetools View Post
A hole saw is not a precision item and is meant to drill a rough size clearance hole. What I would as been suggested by others is to measure the run out with something of a know dimension such as a rod that's been measured at several points around it's circumference mounted in the chuck and measured with a dial indicator as you turn the chuck by hand.
Are you a spammer or just a dumb ***? You cut and pasted this from post #6 above- complete w/the typos!! What a loser.
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