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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2012, 10:01 PM
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Only when the answer isn't too important. You know, every body man will "manipulate" a panel. I am not tellin you to jump up and down on the corners of the panel but stretching the top and bottom is exactly what it needs. When I was first learning to use my English wheel it was amazing to see the instructor twist and manipulate the panel to get the shape he needed. When you take a compound curve and straighten it by hand one way it will tighten up the other direction. Nothing beats experience no matter what the craft is.
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Old 04-10-2012, 10:08 PM
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The way I blocked the one I did, is I started blocking from the crease to the edge of the hood holding the block to a 90 degree angle from the crease, not perpendicular with the crease. That way you eliminate any ripples looking from the side of the hood looking across to the short side of the hood. If your blocks are flat enough you will maintain that eveness right along the long side of the hood (front to back). Basically what I am trying to say is block it side to side in a criss cross pattern working it opposite of what you would think you should from front to rear. Give this a shot and see how it works for you, good luck!
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Old 04-10-2012, 10:23 PM
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I do think it would be easier to block if you had skimmed the whole panel even though the scoop is going to be there. You are going to have to deal with another area to feather in which just complicates the job. With that being a large flat panel, why don't you get a few sheets of 40 grit to go on that long board work the panel down until you can block all guide coat off it and get down to 120 grit to rid the 40 grit sand scratches. Then you can prime with a good polyester primer surfaced and block down with your finer grits from there. Take your time and be patient. You will get there. Will look forward to hearing how it goes.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:36 AM
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I have better luck with an air file when blocksanding. It's easier for me to regulate the down pressure that I use. When I handsand I always get carried away.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr4speed
The way I blocked the one I did, is I started blocking from the crease to the edge of the hood holding the block to a 90 degree angle from the crease, not perpendicular with the crease. That way you eliminate any ripples looking from the side of the hood looking across to the short side of the hood. If your blocks are flat enough you will maintain that eveness right along the long side of the hood (front to back). Basically what I am trying to say is block it side to side in a criss cross pattern working it opposite of what you would think you should from front to rear. Give this a shot and see how it works for you, good luck!
How do you keep a steady stroke going from front to back?

One thing I should note for y'all and I'm kind of banking on this helping me: the car will be the 97 Dodge Viper blue, which is a metallic blue; not very forgiving. I will have white lemans stripes going over the hood, roof, and trunk per the usual protocol. With the whites being a less revealing color, and the contrast between the blues and whites together playing a trick on your eyes, does this help to conceal any imperfections in the striped area?
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2012, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John long
I do think it would be easier to block if you had skimmed the whole panel even though the scoop is going to be there. You are going to have to deal with another area to feather in which just complicates the job. With that being a large flat panel, why don't you get a few sheets of 40 grit to go on that long board work the panel down until you can block all guide coat off it and get down to 120 grit to rid the 40 grit sand scratches. Then you can prime with a good polyester primer surfaced and block down with your finer grits from there. Take your time and be patient. You will get there. Will look forward to hearing how it goes.
John this is the plan. I got fed up with the car so I stepped away for a few days and decided to update our bathroom on a whim I'm spraying my last coat on the trim and cabinets tonight then hope to take another try at this hood with new advice and confidence restored.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John long
Only when the answer isn't too important. You know, every body man will "manipulate" a panel. I am not tellin you to jump up and down on the corners of the panel but stretching the top and bottom is exactly what it needs. When I was first learning to use my English wheel it was amazing to see the instructor twist and manipulate the panel to get the shape he needed. When you take a compound curve and straighten it by hand one way it will tighten up the other direction. Nothing beats experience no matter what the craft is.
I shouldn't even be asking because I never bow down to a challenge, but is this stretched with on-dolly hammering in the absence of an English wheel? Does the on-dolly hammering happen in the vicinity of the top and bottom corner on the afflicted side? I assume this would then have to be skimmed with glazing putty to cover up the the work marks...
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2012, 10:53 AM
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Good afternoon Lizer, The truth of the matter is, either it is straight or it isn't. True, black really accentuates a wave or missed ding but you can be sure, white won't hide them. While perfection is hard to achieve, I would encourage you to do the very best you can. You will be glad you did in the end.

As you cut the filler, remember once you touch bare metal stop sanding. At that point, you can no longer sand the high spot down. All you can do is make the low spot lower. If you still have low spots, coat it again and block it again until you can eliminate the low spots before you get back to bare metal. As I said earlier it is a matter of patience. You can do it.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2012, 11:13 AM
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I am probably not the best person to ask on reworking the valance Josh. I suspect that would be difficult with a hammer and dolly. I suspect you could do it with your bare hands. Maybe Brian Martinsr will jump in here. He is an experienced auto body tech. I do know that either the top and bottom that panel has to be stretched or the center has to be shrunk.........unless, you build up the quarter panel to close the gap.

John L.
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Old 04-11-2012, 01:24 PM
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People have thier opinions, but I opted for AFS sanding blocks and will never use anything else. 10 minutes and you'll have that hood straight and true.

http://adjustablesander.com/
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2012, 03:44 PM
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I think it's more a function of what grit I'm using to sand moreso than the specific block itself. Durablocks are a good block.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Lizer
What are your methods? Thanks.
There are acutaly 3 "secreats" when used in combanation will nail it every time

oldie but a goodie some stuff you already know but the 3 are in there

clicky --> http://www.a2zautoforums.com/showthr...6&page=1&pp=20

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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 04-12-2012, 02:35 AM
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Milo, did the "clicky". it was cool. i always have done the 45 degree cross sanding up and down to get the shape, most of the time i find a guide coat is not needed after that. but after useing a long board with 36-80 and 120 i do sometimes guidecoat and hit the panel with 220 wet or dry on the longboard just to make sure.

Milo, on your avatar on hotrodders all it has ever said is "in the garage" in the "clicky" from 2002 it says mountain view. Kool, i am in santa rosa and do fiberglass when not riding my HD. northern cal guys rock.
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Old 04-12-2012, 06:44 AM
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i am in santa rosa and do fiberglass when not riding my HD. northern cal guys rock.
Good wine country and you got a glider field near you too.
Blue skies and green lights ridin through the great shakies of Cali
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 04-12-2012, 06:57 AM
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First off ,getting a hood super straight takes experiance and struggling like this is how you get there...I remember my first (a black 442 olds) but I had the benefit of being at a shop with much more experienced bodymen that helped me out...still it took about 4 days, so you will get there if your patient.
One thing I did back was to hot glue paint paddles to the underside of the hood to stiffen it up,what a difference...second I ditched the DA and used the 8" DA (mud hog) with a circular motion...WOW ,that was so much better ,the bigger footprint worked like a snowshoe on the snow....
I was always rushing to 80 grit guide coat your bondo and it may take you 4=5 times before your ready for 80...when your ready to sand with 80 give it a quick breeze over just to knock down the 40 grit scratches,thats all the 80 grit sanding you'll ever need for bondo..Now your ready for poly putty (I like EZ sand)this stuff sands so nice you'll notice right off how much better it is than finishing off bondo,Do all your 80 sanding with a hand block(dont forget the guide coat I use the poly putty instead of any kind of filling primer,its faster and quicker and easier for me ,not to mention cheaper....when thats done the rest should be EZ hand block with 180 then 320, then prime....That was then,
Nowdays,there is only one trick ,I do everything by hand starting with 36-40 grit blocking BUT I never allow the bondo to fully dry before I start sanding.
It's like sanding butter and will shave hours off your sanding time ,DAYS for you new guys...The hard part is waiting for the sweet spot where its stiff enough to sand but not smear...you dont have to apply any pressure at all just let the weight of the block do it all ,you'll see right off the paper clogs fast so you'll need an air blower to blow out the soft bondo from the clogged paper ,just give it a quick blow and keep going (dont forget the guide coat) You'll also need to know how much hardener to add and that depends on the outside temp ,normally as a rule of thumb you plop the bondo on your board in a round circular shape then once its flattened itself out you bisect the circle with one ribbon of hardener ,it dosent matter how big your circle is.the hotter it is outside the less you use,everyone always uses to much hardener and once youve not added enough and had to remove it ,its understandable....One of the nice things about experience is what I remember taking me 4 days of hard work and dreading every one that comes in now only takes about 4 hours and its fairly EZ work and I dont mind it at all...
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