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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2007, 11:59 AM
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If the wind is just right you can get the dust fallout at your house from my Rage Gold. (not today though)

The trunk lid off my '31 Brookville had so many dents manufactured into it that it took me 2 complete skim coats, 2 or 3 partial coats, three layers of poly primer, some Icing then two coats of SPI 2K. And when I finished, most of it was dust, but the trunk lid is now smooth and ready for paint.

The doors weren't quite as bad and I'm finishing them today/tomorrow, heat and humidity pending. The splash shields, front fenders, grille shell and dash are ready for paint - it only took me 5 months mixed with honey do's and other projects. (Running boards are painted, waiting covers installed)

I have a 10" and a 16" long board, a 10" Durablock, several 4" and some smaller pieces of Durablocks as well as assorted other sanding aids, different diameter pieces of hose, - even a paint stirrer stick. And, I, being a rank amateur, need all the help I can get - and ask here and the SPI website what may be dumb questions to many, but I need an answer to satisfy me and make sure that I'm doing it right (or close enough)


Dave

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2007, 07:51 PM
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Thanks for the moral support guys and the great tips. I'll get er done. Just have to get off my duff and stop complaining.

(But it is good to know I'm not alone)
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Old 08-13-2007, 10:04 AM
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Think of it as highs & lows. First thing I do is to make sure the bare metal has no high spots. High spots are bad. Low spots can be filled to an extent. High spots mean you stop sanding, and add more filler to build up the surrounding area or start over. It's better to be low than high.

Next get yourself a good spreader. For large areas I use a metal 6" spreader sold at body supply shops. Mix up enough to fill the dent & more. Fillers cheap, compared to not having enough to fill the low spot & having to come back a second time. I always apply a lot more than is needed & sand it off. It saves me in the long run since I can usually take care of it in one pass. From the start keep all of the filler on one side of the spreader. Depending on the size I start out a good 4-8" out & pull the spread in & past the low spot. Work the filler in from all directions from the outside in. Don't stop in the middle, but travel past as you relieve the pressure. If you stop in the middle & then come back from the other side you will trap air & have air pockets to deal with. Keep adding filler until you know you have filled the lows & more.

I sand just like I fill. from the outside in. Work the block around the perimeter, so that you feather the edges first, keep working around until you have all the filler sanded smooth. Don't worry if it's not flat, in fact you want to end up with a slight high crown in the middle. Next comes the actual shaping. I hold the block parallel to the natural lines of the body & sand in stokes at 45 to the block, mixed in with a few straight back & forths. If you hit metal (high spot) stop, tap it down & start over, make sure that you don't apply any filler over unsanded filler. When you get real close to the final shape, let the block just glide over the panel. Let the block tell you were the highs are and keep sanding until you hit the lows. Next thing you know you have no highs or lows but a nice wave free straight panel.

Good luck.
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Old 08-13-2007, 04:34 PM
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Before you do anything more, get a 3' piece of flat iron or straight edge of some kind and run it over the panel...it will aquaint you with the highs and lows and how big they really are...for free without sanding
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Old 08-13-2007, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAYzr
Before you do anything more, get a 3' piece of flat iron or straight edge of some kind and run it over the panel...it will aquaint you with the highs and lows and how big they really are...for free without sanding
That's a good tip, I have a variety of straight edges to check the panels with, also good for checking panel alignment.
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Old 08-13-2007, 08:57 PM
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This is a good thread for anyone to read. I have not touched body work in years (never was any good at it), but reading online has helped with procedures and tools.

Someday, I will be the one asking questions.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2007, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAYzr
Before you do anything more, get a 3' piece of flat iron or straight edge of some kind and run it over the panel...it will aquaint you with the highs and lows and how big they really are...for free without sanding
That's a great tip RAYzr, and something we all ought to be doing! I actually use a cheap aluminum yard stick from the hardware store, since I'm too weak to pick up a piece of 3" flat iron!
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2007, 05:12 PM
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Hello gentlemen, I haven't posted here in quite some time. I frequent Team Chevelle. I see a few familiar faces in the crowd (Sevt, and Martinsr). They have helped me out alot.

Anyhow, the reason I am here is to see if you guys could also give me some tips for body work. I didn't want to start a new thread and waste band width. Anyhow, I have a 1969 Chevelle Super Sport. It's had the trunk floor, tail panel, inner/outter tubs replaced and had those crappy 80% skins put on it. The man who skinned it did so about 1-2 inches above the body line. Why? I don't know, but I do know I have some warage. Anyhow, on with the show.









I also have this door that is giving me fits. It has a low spot right on the body line in the very center of the door. I beat it out was much as I could, but it needs filler.


Anyhow, as you can see on the quarter (inside shot) the thing was lap welded. The new metal is UNDER the old metal, so the old quarter is stepped up ever so slightly. The problem is that is is right near the body line. I am not getting a smooth transition from metal, to filler to metal. It;s still like I have a sharp angle? instead of a smooth flow. It's hard to explain. I have an 18 inch board, 5-6 in block and 80/120 grit paper that I have been using. I've used a DA sander with 120 to knock down some of the large surface area to save some time. I am currently using metal glaze.


Please help!

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Old 08-14-2007, 07:02 PM
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I'm not a great body man but I think it helps to put a real thin (very, very thin) cloth glove on when feeling for highs and lows. The cloth helps your hand slide over the panel with less friction. It may not work for everybody but it helps me out.

Danny
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:30 PM
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On large flat panels don't put any pressure on your air board, just let it glide slightly over the filler. It will take forever to cut the filler, even with a new piece of paper, but you won't get the waves. The larger the panel, the easier it is to distort the filler. Leave the skim coat for last, there is no point in doing it, until the panel is really close.
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:44 PM
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Don't bother using the DA for any of that shaping work. You need to use your 18" board and 80 grit paper untill the shape is right. Also when working an area that large it'll be best to just skim that whole area and block it down looking for high and low areas. Was the panel flanged before it was installed or just slid under the old panel? Use a guidecoat over your filler to help you see how the shape is forming. Any high spots will need to be nocked down otherwise you'll have a fight that you'll never win. These half quarters are a PITA unless you fit them well and butt weld them in-which takes a heck of a lot of time initially but saves on finishing work in the end. Is that self etch primer dusted over the panel?-for moisture protection or use as a guidecoat? Don't trap any self etch between filler applications.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2007, 09:04 PM
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IT doesn't appear to be flanged. That etchig primer is just to keep the moisture away. How you do suggest knocking down those high spots? I have an inexpensive harbor freight hammer and dolley set. I really can't afford to sink a bunch of money into body tools.

Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:12 PM
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Run your sanding board over the whole panel and it'll show you where the highs and lows are. Your cheap body hammers should work Ok if they have a slight crown to the face- if not just make sure there's no sharp edges on the face of the hammer-use your DA if necessary to shape the hammer head some. You'll want to use a dolly off method when working those high spots down. Hold the dolly on the outer edge of the high area and slightly tap the high spot down, run your board over the area to check your progress. You can work any low areas up with the same proceedure. When all the high spots are down you'll then want to skim the panel and block it looking for low areas.
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:54 PM
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I find it easiest when doing a large area to knock into shape some with 36 on a board while still semi soft. Then when it hardens up some more and will feather, sand in cross patterns across the whole filler area if possible, till all edges feather out. Then feel for possible high spots in filler that need some more sanding. If you have any fairly low areas still in your filler, fill those spots in and block it while still somewhat soft, so it cuts down easy enough that you not taking a lot of your previous filler off while sanding those fill spots. Then spread a coat over the whole thing again and block. If you have a bodyline to make, may want to tape off half at the bodyline and concentrate on spreading and straightening a half at a time up, or work on gettng the bodyline straight first. Throw away that 120 and da until you got it straight with 36, 80, 120 I'll only use on a orbital palm sander after everything is blocked straight to get 8o grit scratch a little finer for primer. A lot easier to get things blocked straight with the courser grits. Skim coating whole area after blocked out straigt, or leaving some room when blocking the filler and things are feeling straight for working over with finer grit will take care of the scratch. I'll add to bobs off dolly to knock down high spots, that you should hold your hammer kind of loose in your hand and should allow it to spring off the metal. Everyone is giving you good advice. But so much easier to explain,show, and pick up things if working and showing hands on how would go about attacking it.
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Old 08-14-2007, 10:14 PM
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Thanks Gentlemen! You are a big help. What do I do about area's of warpage up in the sail panel where no mere mortal can access?
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