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Old 07-12-2011, 08:20 PM
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Why is a timer important while painting?

I can understand if you're trying to cut it down to the very last second..

But what if I want to spray a coat (of epoxy, 2k, or base or clear), then come back in 52 minutes, and spray another coat.. Then wait 36 minutes, then spray another coat?

I just don't understand why that woudl be bad.

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Old 07-12-2011, 09:29 PM
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You don't NEED a timer but you do need to keep track of the time. Each paint product will have a "P" sheet (product sheet) that will give specifics about that particular product's recommended spray pressure for a given type of gun, recoat window, mixing ratios, part numbers for different reducers and many other things you need to know to successfully use the product. So, if you're going to recoat you need to know the recoat window. If its 30 minutes for instance, then you'll have to recoat within that time period. If you wait longer then you'll have to scuff before you recoat. So keeping track of the time is important.

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Old 07-12-2011, 09:40 PM
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there is a certain amount of time that is called flash time. the advertised flash times are minimums for the solvents to flash off before you apply another coat of material. that time is based on perfect temperature and humidity conditions that are not present in your shop. waiting and allowing a good amount of time between applications allow the solvents to come out and prevent issues such as solvent pop occurring.

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Old 07-12-2011, 09:44 PM
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Centerline: I've never heard of a 30 minute recoat?! Usually, it's 8-24-72 hour type deals.

Onemoretime: So really, there is no disadvantage (And even possibly an advantage) to waiting a couple hours between each coat?
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:16 PM
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Like the Kung Foo guy said. "patience grasshopper" just shoot a coat of material clean out your gun and go have a soda, cuppa coffee whatever then come back and inspect what you have done. correct any flaws you see then go to the next coat of material. Base coats require maybe no more than 2-3 coats to shoot to coverage max and then 2-3 coats of clear and we are done. only thing left is the buff..

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Old 07-13-2011, 12:12 AM
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Thank ya sir.. So I guess most people are trying to do it as quickly as possible. Being my first all over, I plan to take lots of time between coats to regain my composure.

So, to sum up. Don't worry about the timer, and it's cool to wait an hour between coats?
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Old 07-13-2011, 01:55 AM
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Yup you can wait between coats..

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Old 07-13-2011, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyK81
Centerline: I've never heard of a 30 minute recoat?! Usually, it's 8-24-72 hour type deals.
Was used as an example only. Didn't say it was realistic.

Before painting you really should consult the "P" sheet for the product you're using. HERE is a typical "P" sheet for one of NAPA's base coats. If you'll notice it says to "Apply each coat within 30 minutes of each other to prevent any possible recoat lift." It also says you can apply the clearcoat from 10 minutes to 7 days after last coat of base.

The point is each brand of automotive paint is formulated a little differently and each has its own procedures for successfully applying the material. I'm guessing the "P" sheets for the paint you're using are available on the web and before spraying anything, I would print a copy, read and adhere to the recommended times listed for that product.

Its your car and you're the painter. Success is totally in your hands so you can take your chances or follow the manufacturer's recommendations. Its up to you.

Good luck.

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Old 07-13-2011, 03:21 PM
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Wha? Obviously i read the tech sheets. I swear by them.

BUT, all the tech sheets for my products (Prospray) say wait to flash 10-15 minutes (or some such).. Doesn't say if it's bad to wait 3 hours.
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Old 07-13-2011, 06:54 PM
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Remember, those tech sheets are written for production shops, with good both paint booth air flow.

To answer your question if you wait an hour between coats, you are overkilling and to your benefit.
Then if you let it set 4-12 hours before you clear it, that just eliminated a bunch of potential problems.

Now with base, you could spray a coat today and a coat tomorrow and a coat the next day but there is no point as this is not needed.

When you get to clear, you must be more precise as clears will have different sensitivity times and if you hit one of those times, it will look like you are spraying paint stripper out of the gun.

That is where tech sheets come into play and not something you want to re-engineer.
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Old 07-13-2011, 09:37 PM
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Thanks barry. unfortunately it looks like Prospray has an 8 hour window!! (?!).

So I plan on spraying a coat of epoxy every 30-60 minutes or so.. Then waiting 8ish hours.. Then spraying the high build, probably in 30-60 minute intervals.. No probs?
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Old 07-14-2011, 02:58 AM
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I use a timer to keep me from rushing, but just for the one minute

http://youtu.be/hknVcvv1n9Y
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:21 AM
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the first time you loose tract of time and miss it you will understand. i also have a weather station in the booth .
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:51 AM
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Shine, that's what my question is. Miss what? My 8 hour recoat time? Seems a little severe, no? I don't plan on taking a nap!
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Old 07-14-2011, 10:08 AM
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when timing clear coats it is important to stay consistent. or at least i do. i decide by weather what i will do. i write it down on the DA list and stick to it. base is no big deal but i like to be in control .
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