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Old 12-22-2004, 10:18 AM
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winter rod

We got hit with a winter storm this morning.

I was thinking about how my "summer car" is tucked away for the season and why.

It occured to me that I'm really not so much worried about the paint, or even an accident, as I am about the corrosive effects of salt on the chassis and the underside of the body.

It led me to wonder if it wouldn't be possible to build an "all-year rod" that was capable of withstanding inclement weather without damage.

Obviously, this isn't something you'd want to do with a rare vehicle, but a lot of us have "rods" that aren't showpieces even in the summertime. Personally, I hate it when I can't take the car out early enough for the nice days before the winter ends, or those lingering days before winter sets in when the car's already put to bed.

So I'm sort of wondering out loud if there wouldn't be ways to protect a vehicle from the winter in a better manner than the OEM manufacturers do. Plus, a lot of us can't afford more than one vehicle - being able to build a machine capable of withstanding the winter might bring others into the hobby, or allow those of us in it to get more enjoyment out of our rides.

The first thing that came to mind is a full-length belly pan that would repel a lot of the road grime and keep it out of the nooks and crannies.

Coating exposed pieces with a good quality paint, using rubber boots or other seals over exposed linkages or bolts also seems like a good idea.

In my experience, the big areas of concern are where road salt and grime is thrown up by the wheels. The fenders typically catch all that gunk and then hold it where it starts eating away at the body. Ditto with the rocker panels.

Seems like a better system of wheel wells could keep a lot of that stuff off the body if sealed properly.

Anyone have any other thoughts. Am I just talking crazy?

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Old 12-22-2004, 10:26 AM
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Not really

I have always wanted my cars to be something I coudl actually take out and use..if a get a bit of dut or rain so what..??

Uisng body schutz on the underside and washing the undercarriage after a trip to he beach is part of the drill around here..

Some good maintenance practices and you can drive all year long..

OMT
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Old 12-22-2004, 11:32 AM
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My winter "Rod" is a '86 gmc 1 ton dually 4x4 with a mild 454. Then again, winter for me happens in Maine.
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Old 12-22-2004, 11:38 AM
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Yeah, I'm in Cleveland OH. I used to live in the "snow belt" on the East side of the city where the lake effect caused an unbelievable amount of snow.

Now I'm on the West side. The snow isn't as bad, but we salt the roads from November through March.

The salt is what kills our cars.


"Daily Driver" seems to have a certain amount of cachet around the enthusiast community, especially in the rodding mags, but that usually means "daily driver when the weather is nice".

Building a great-looking daily driver that can withstand the harsh weather would truly be an accomplishment.
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Old 12-22-2004, 05:27 PM
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old cop car. save oil from oil changes, and get a refillable aerosol can that gets pressure from an air compressor, guys at my old work use these thiings to spray brake-cleaner.

spray underside of car with the oil periodically.
-matt
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Old 12-23-2004, 03:09 PM
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HEY CK:
My husband drives his street rod all year around. He won't take it out in the snow or salt residue but on bright sunny days it is out. It has a heater to take off chill but we let it run... At 61 who are you saving it for? ? ? . . THERESA
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Old 12-23-2004, 07:32 PM
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Chevelle..... That is the kind of stuff that really gets the "tree huggers" up in arms against the Rodders. The oil that you are suggesting spraying on the underside of the car is going to end up on the ground, then in the water system. It takes very little oil to polute many gallons of water.
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Old 12-23-2004, 08:38 PM
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Tree huggers Blah! I coat my truck every fall with diesel and oil mix. But if you really want to save one strip the underside and have it coated with a spray in bedliner like linex or such. or have it powder coated.
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Old 12-27-2004, 07:27 PM
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Tree Huggers

You know, if the tree huggers had their way, (read Earth in the Balance by Loser Al gore), we would all be walking around, barefooted, stark naked, in the cold, and no heat to look forward to. And your car would be parked in some place to be denegrated as some kind of evil monster.
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Old 01-01-2005, 12:11 AM
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I would think a good undercoating and periodical washes would prevent rust. But what about driving on slick and icy roads. I would think that could get dangerous with a high horse power rear wheel drive car.
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Old 01-01-2005, 05:43 AM
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I know a guy in Canada that drives his 29 Ford "roadster" year round. He has a removable top on it.
Personally I wouldn't try to make one car do it all. I always had a winter beater when I lived in Anchorage because it was likely to get whacked so you didn't want something you had a big investment in. One of my favorites was a 62 Chevy2 with a 4 banger and posi. Then there was the 74 Olds Omega (nova clone) Hatchback with posi and a 320 horse 330 motor from a 67 Cutlass. The best one was the 75 Bronco, 302 C4.
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Old 01-01-2005, 07:15 AM
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run me over, I'm a tree hugger!

If your gona spray the bottem, it doesn't have to be motor oil or deisel to work

Use mineral oil from the drugstore, cheap enough and doesn't pollute and it's inert, won't hurt the paint etc.
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Old 01-02-2005, 06:12 PM
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Re: run me over, I'm a tree hugger!

Quote:
Originally posted by red65mustang
If your gona spray the bottem, it doesn't have to be motor oil or deisel to work

Use mineral oil from the drugstore, cheap enough and doesn't pollute and it's inert, won't hurt the paint etc.
could I raid mom's kitchen and pirate the olive oil or cooking oil? I do know the petro oil is bad for the environment, (tree huggers are stupid, people who STILL dump their used motor oil in the grass is too, but I'm an "environmentally conscious" hotrodder).

-matt
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Old 01-03-2005, 03:37 AM
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"Raid the Kitchen"

spray the bottem and exhaust with vegetable oil.....smell like a french fry.....

wipe down the bottem and exhaust with a slab of bacon.....smell like breakfast......

Hey Therasa, I can't think of a cooking oil that is viscous (sticks) enough to not wash off with salt and water but that you could spray......

I know! Let's e-mail Martha Stewart and ask her, she's not busy!

Matt, good for you, I'm glad I'll probably be gone by 2020 when the sh## hit the fan cause pollution is increasing geometrically!

"A smart dog doesn't sh## in his own back yard!", we are very dumb dogs!
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Old 07-17-2010, 02:07 PM
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Winter cars/year round cars...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckucia
We got hit with a winter storm this morning.

I was thinking about how my "summer car" is tucked away for the season and why.

It occured to me that I'm really not so much worried about the paint, or even an accident, as I am about the corrosive effects of salt on the chassis and the underside of the body.

It led me to wonder if it wouldn't be possible to build an "all-year rod" that was capable of withstanding inclement weather without damage.

Obviously, this isn't something you'd want to do with a rare vehicle, but a lot of us have "rods" that aren't showpieces even in the summertime. Personally, I hate it when I can't take the car out early enough for the nice days before the winter ends, or those lingering days before winter sets in when the car's already put to bed.

So I'm sort of wondering out loud if there wouldn't be ways to protect a vehicle from the winter in a better manner than the OEM manufacturers do. Plus, a lot of us can't afford more than one vehicle - being able to build a machine capable of withstanding the winter might bring others into the hobby, or allow those of us in it to get more enjoyment out of our rides.

The first thing that came to mind is a full-length belly pan that would repel a lot of the road grime and keep it out of the nooks and crannies.

Coating exposed pieces with a good quality paint, using rubber boots or other seals over exposed linkages or bolts also seems like a good idea.

In my experience, the big areas of concern are where road salt and grime is thrown up by the wheels. The fenders typically catch all that gunk and then hold it where it starts eating away at the body. Ditto with the rocker panels.

Seems like a better system of wheel wells could keep a lot of that stuff off the body if sealed properly.

Anyone have any other thoughts. Am I just talking crazy?
**************
Your thoughts about making car under carriages more protective of the hardware there is a concept I have considered for years. I have also read that the roughness of the under carriage damages the aerodynamic aspects of the vehicle and increases drag. I have noted that on a Nissan Altima which I have, the slash guards up front under the engine are way more protective than what I have seen on Fords and GM cars I have owned.

I think as much attention should be paid to the under carriage as the aerodynamics of the upper body. The big deal with streamlining aircraft was making the entire aircraft body as smooth as possible including and especially the underside. Thus, if there were practical ways to keep the exhaust system from turning an enclosure into a bake oven, it would seem that the under side of the car should have some sort of nice smooth covering which could be removed without a major effort to access parts for maintenance purposes.

I would speculate that the reason that no manufacturers do this to any great degree is the added cost since they apparently spend considerable debate on how many fasteners, washers, etc to put on some assemblies to save a penny here or there. That's what I hear anyway. Also the great shop costs of replacing rusted brake lines, rusted fuel lines, replacement of calipers due to broken off bleeder screws, etc is big business for the dealers and the entire auto repair infrastructure.

I think your idea of under carriage protection is an excellent idea waiting for the Japs to do first just like a lot of other things they have done well so that the good old USA can play "me too" later and try to equal the challenge.
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