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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 12-21-2008, 10:12 AM
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Dan 84 s10 with 5.7 TPI,700r4
 
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compressor

I agree with Roger1 on mine I ran # 8 wire 50 amp breaker but I added a quick disconnect between the breaker box and the compressor.

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2008, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
You say you installed a 50Amp outlet.
That may be the wrong one for your dryer.

I have never seen an electric residential dryer that wasn't 30 Amps.

50 Amp will require #8 and 30 Amp requires #10.
The outlet is actually for a welder rated at 20A. What I did was run a line using 10gage from the new garage outlet to a junction box near the dryer. In the junction box I spliced in a dryer cord having the correct pin type for an existing dryer outlet. When I want to use the welder I unplug the dryer and plug in my new garage line. The dryer line is 10gage with a 30A breaker near the outlet. So in effect what I have is an extension running from the dryer outlet. I ran it this way because the main panel is full.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 12-22-2008, 11:18 AM
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I did it too

In the early 50's my step dad bought a welder for the ranch.. the only 220 outlet was for the elect stove so we just made a big extersion cord and brought the welder up to the house. a 200ft walk to old blacksmith shop if you needed another tool. In my new shop my son is an electrical contractor and he installed a 200 amp 42 circuit panel and a 100 amp sub panel... every major tool has it's own dedicaataed circuit. and when I was building it I said what's this outlet box for and he said someday you will buy a plasma cutter and it goes right here. I still have about a dozen spaces in the sub panel...the lights don't go dim when the air comp kicks in. when someone is weldiing or using one of the big saws.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2008, 01:14 PM
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you guys are killin me! scott, as long as you cannot possibly run both the dryer and your whatever at the same time you will be fine they way you have it.

aluminum wire is still used in every new house. for range wire, for your service entrance conductors, both from the transformer and down your service mast. just not for anything else however.

#8 gauge wire can only handle 50A if it is copper and you are using it at 100% of it's rated capacity, not 125% as in if it's for a motor. it's probably easier to find #6 copper romex than #8 anyway.

the size of your circuit is determined by one and only one item: the overcurrent device, ie the breaker. whether or not you will burn your house down is up to you and the size of wire you want to use. try table 310.16 in the NEC and if you have a load that is a motor or on for over 3 hours at a time mulitply your load by 125% (1.25) to size your circuit.

if you put a new dryer (with a 4 prong plug having a nuetral) to an older 3 prong outlet, you will be using a 3 prong cord/plug. the nuetral and ground will have provisions to be tied together inside the dryer at the cord connection. and i have recently found out that yes indeed, both the light, computer AND the motor turning the drum, run on 120V. only the heating elements run on 240.

all circuit conductors are req'd to be run in the same raceway or cable. EMT is considered a grounding conductor with approved couplings/connectors so no need for a grounding conductor (green wire). except from the box to the cord/recep.
what else did you guys post here:
the two hots do have to be under the same breaker. however two 120V (single pole) breakers can be tied together with an approved handle tie if you put them next to each other. if you were hard up for temporary purposes only you could take the hot from two 120v circuits and make 240 happen, but if and only if the hots came from different phases in the panel.
you guys scare me with this one. hire somebody that knows what they are doing.
i used to frequent a dyi forum for electrical work, but i realized i was probably doing more harm that good. i STRONGLY recommend against you laymen doing ANY electrical work at all. some people think that if they can use a screwdriver and have a dyi book that they are electricians. y'aarrrr!!!
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2008, 08:06 AM
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aluminum wire

Aluminum wire requires all equipment and connectors be approved for aluminium . Al is soft and the old connectors would allow the wire to losen then spark ...then mabe a fire. Electricians now coat aluminum connections with a special anti- oxidant compound... Leave it to a Pro ... Keep my son and step son working ! ! !

Last edited by timothale; 12-24-2008 at 01:52 PM.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2008, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bullheimer
i used to frequent a dyi forum for electrical work, but i realized i was probably doing more harm that good. i STRONGLY recommend against you laymen doing ANY electrical work at all. some people think that if they can use a screwdriver and have a dyi book that they are electricians. y'aarrrr!!!


I could not agree more! I have in the past said that these threads about wiring compressors (or most anything) can be just plain dangerous and should be left to a pro or at least checked out by a pro before turning on the power. I am not a licensed electrician but I did learn the basics of wiring by spending many years installing equipment. I have seen a heck of a lot of DIY installations with problems ranging from just would not run to damage to the equipment and all of these fellows had asked advice from someone else. The biggest problem I see with "long distance" advice on wiring is the safety concerns, several times I have seen compressors wired by a DIYer that was improperly grounded and when the hazard was pointed out every single time the response was "but it runs just fine" I think that probably anyone here could do a proper job of wiring AFTER a bit of instruction but guys electricity is nothing to teach yourself because it is VERY unforgiving to mistakes and has no conscience at all!
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 12-26-2008, 06:47 PM
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[QUOTE=bullheimer]you guys are killin me! scott, as long as you cannot possibly run both the dryer and your whatever at the same time you will be fine they way you have it.

bullheimer...........lol............no doubt...........in my case, I have been doing my own electrical work for about 30 years and I have had some of my work inspected by the town (both rough and finished). I have done mostly 120v including wiring in new circuits. I put a dedicated 240v line for baseboard heat in my own garage. The 240v extension I just did is in my fiances house. One thing I am very careful about is workmanship and I know the ramifications of knicking the copper wire when stripping the end for a connection. I am fully aware that the governing factor for wire size is primarily the breaker rating although the length of the run needs to be considered too. And, you are correct............I can only run either the dryer or, something else on the extension but not both at the same time.

Thanks for the tips
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 06:02 AM
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I personally would not wire a dryer and an air compressor recept on the same circuit, even if the intention is to not run them at the same time. . They are dedicated loads and as such, need separate circuit breakers and wiring to the recepts.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman2333
I personally would not wire a dryer and an air compressor recept on the same circuit, even if the intention is to not run them at the same time. . They are dedicated loads and as such, need separate circuit breakers and wiring to the recepts.
I agree wholeheartedly with this.
Do it right!

If somehow you caused a fire by doing it wrong and an investigation turned up what you did, I wouldn't be surprised if the insurance company would try to get out of paying your claim. Plus, why put safety to risk? Someone could get hurt.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:11 AM
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Good point. Insurance companies won't pay for botched, uninspected, unpermitted homeowner wiring that caused a fire.
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman2333
I personally would not wire a dryer and an air compressor recept on the same circuit, even if the intention is to not run them at the same time. . They are dedicated loads and as such, need separate circuit breakers and wiring to the recepts.
Maybe I read post #32 wrong. I read it that one is unplugged and the other is plugged in as needed.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:44 AM
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It doesn't matter if he uses a dryer with the wrong recept in order to use a compressor with an extension cord or has two different recepts on one circuit, either way it's not right and will cause problems.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bullheimer
aluminum wire is still used in every new house. :
I think you might want to check electric codes. I think they are National, although in Illinois aluminum wiring has been banned for at least a decade and probably longer. It may not be a National standard, but I know in many states you won't find ANY new houses built with that wiring. I doubt that insurance can even be gotten for a home with that wire, here it ALL had to be replaced because of fire potential,as the connection would loosen from heat expansion ,the heat created form the loose connections caused too many fires and is no longer accepted.I'll post what year that was when I locate my electrical code book.
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodz428
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullheimer
aluminum wire is still used in every new house. :
I think you might want to check electric codes. I think they are National, although in Illinois aluminum wiring has been banned for at least a decade and probably longer. It may not be a National standard, but I know in many states you won't find ANY new houses built with that wiring.
Some important context is lost in the above partial quote of bullheimer's comment, IMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullheimer
aluminum wire is still used in every new house. for range wire, for your service entrance conductors, both from the transformer and down your service mast. just not for anything else however.
[Bold added].

Every new house in my area has aluminum service drop conductors. The range wiring seems to depend upon the electrician. None have aluminum conductors anywhere else in the house. This matches bullheimer's statements very closely.
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:13 PM
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On the projects I do it usually specs that aluminum wire shall not be used in sizes smaller than #8 awg. Even then they need to be in a compression adapter before inserting it into the termination. The NEC does allow both feeders and branch circuits to be in aluminum but I personally wouldn't do it.

Years ago, aluminum wire was used because of the cost benefit, but it was discovered that people were not stripping it properly nor were they putting it under cl/au terminals. This caused loose connections and then fires.

Although insurance can be problematic on houses wired in aluminum, you can get insurance on them. If cared for properly, as in retorquing connections and using noalox, you can have a safe installation on branch circuits.

Example of compression adapter: http://www.wescodirect.com/direct/Pr...oductId=141622
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