Worried about welding - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-11-2002, 12:08 PM
Mav's Avatar
Mav Mav is offline
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Ga
Posts: 41
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Talking Worried about welding

Im not a welder by trade but ive done my fair share of welding,I can fabricate and do heavy duty welding.

Im in the process of restoring a 72 maverick,The Body of the car is as straight as an arrow.The only problem im going to have is the trim and emblem holes...

Theres about 25 holes on each side of the car...
Im worried that when im done filling them in im going to be left with a body full of waves...

Any tips , suggestions or alternatives to welding will be greatly appreciated

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-11-2002, 12:29 PM
dharroald's Avatar
Tenacious D Rocks!!!
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Burrton, KS
Age: 29
Posts: 31
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

bondo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-11-2002, 01:07 PM
Halloweenking's Avatar
Fantastically cannibalistic!
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Spooksville
Posts: 1,353
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

Mav, I am a body tech and used to build custom cars exsclusively.

Those body trim and eblems holes shouldn't be a problem to weld up. Since they are small but plentiful all you need to do is keep the heat down to a minimum, its a long and slow process, but will be well worth it. Just weld a little, stop let it cool, then proceed with the same process untill you get it done. Just keep the heat to a minimum and you'll be fine. Thes the only quality way to do it for a good finish that will last.

Bondo and other fillers will work, but you run the risc of it falling out after a few years or absorbing moisture from the uncoated side.

HK
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2002, 03:01 PM
Kevin45's Avatar
Just one of the guys
 

Last journal entry: Garage Toys
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Age: 58
Posts: 3,058
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Post

Mav,
To get it ready you will have to have the door panels off and nothing in the road. Get a piece of brass, copper, or aluminun to back up the holes. Weld will not stick to these three materials. Best yet get it all ready and find someone with a tig welder. Tig is a softer weld and can be ground easier and I think you may be able to reduce your heat considerably. As Halloweenking stated, don't use bondo. If you do you can figure on redoing it within a year as it will definately crack around the hole and some will even pop out. Spend the time and if need be the money and do it right the first time. It's cheaper than redoing it the second time.

Kevin
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2002, 03:06 PM
Mav's Avatar
Mav Mav is offline
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Ga
Posts: 41
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

Thx for the info guys,

Bondo isnt an option, Not to fill the holes anyway, I think id rather pay someone else to do the work than to introduce bondo to my car

I was just wondering if there were any new products out there or possibly any new technics used now in stead of standard welding...

I have access to a wire feed welder and a few old galaxie fenders laying around, I think ill just drill a few holes in it and see how i do.

Im use to welding 14" H-Pile or fabricating brackets and what not, Putting a welding lead to a fender is a little bit scarry to me ,especially concidering that the body i have looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor.

Ill let you know how it goes ... THX Again ...

[ August 12, 2002: Message edited by: Mav ]</p>
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2002, 10:56 AM
Madd Syntst's Avatar
Returning American Maddman
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Boynton Beach, Fl
Age: 61
Posts: 444
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

Both ideas are very sound. Go slow and use a brass or alum back plate. Weld won't stick and fills holes nice.If the back side doesn't show at all, just tack a piece of tin behind it. Key phrase is Slow as you go!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-15-2002, 11:19 PM
dinger's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Health and safety in the shop or garage
Last journal entry: 36 Ford painting
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Visalia, Ca.
Age: 61
Posts: 2,711
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 102
Thanked 110 Times in 76 Posts
Post

Use a body hammer, pick shaped side, tap the hole a BIT (not a lot) to make a small depression, this will give you a larger weld area to work with, be more forgiving as far as the weld sticking out to far to get smooth when you finish grind. you have the right idea with the practice fenders, a wet sponge may help also. practice.
__________________
"When I was younger, I could remember anything, whether it had happened or not." - Mark Twain
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 05:11 AM
Madd Syntst's Avatar
Returning American Maddman
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Boynton Beach, Fl
Age: 61
Posts: 444
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wink

Dinger, you have me in a quandry? This pick hammer thing. If I picture this right, you are saying that you"dimple" the hole so that you have more room for build up and surface area? I have seen people take a BIG ole drill bit and do a tad more than deburr the hole. They almost countersink it. I didn't know if I liked that idea, but the dimpling soound like it will work!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 05:40 AM
dinger's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Health and safety in the shop or garage
Last journal entry: 36 Ford painting
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Visalia, Ca.
Age: 61
Posts: 2,711
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 102
Thanked 110 Times in 76 Posts
Post

Dimple, that's the word I was searching for. Yes, dimple the hole. If you have a small ball peen hammer, this will work also. use a 15/16 socket or a little larger socket behind the surface to keep the dimpled area smaller.
__________________
"When I was younger, I could remember anything, whether it had happened or not." - Mark Twain
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 03:48 PM
Mav's Avatar
Mav Mav is offline
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Ga
Posts: 41
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thumbs up

Im progressing very well so far, although my practice fender looks like swiss cheese

I started out using a stick welder slow and steady ( seemed to work out ok) I was very careful and gave it plenty of time to cool between but when i ground the weld smooth it burned through.

I saw an ad in jc whitney for a stich/body welder so i ordered it( item # 81NZ1590A)
It works at 80 amps or less so i started at 40 amps. It reduces output by 50% for thin sheet metel.

I started filling the hole ( backed with an 18 guage piece of scrap) and although it was a very slow process i filled it in one pass with no distortion at all, Best of all it required very little grinding !

Im still in the practice stage and im testing higher amps to see if i can speed things up just a little

The "dimple" procedure sounds like a good idea im gonna have to check that out as well...

Now for a hard question Im thinking about buying one of the smaller welding units from Home depot.They have two types , Standard arc and a gasless wirefeed both about the same price ($225) any prefrences ?

My budget (Wife) will only allow me to spend so much and i need something to keep at the house. The arc unit ranges in settings from 60 to 150 amps and the wire feed ranges from 30 to 100 amps.

Again , any tips or suggestions are greatly appreciated ... Oh and by the way ... Thanks for all the input !!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 03:49 PM
Harlequin's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 47
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

The easyist way to fill a whole is to clamp, or have some daring person hold a penny on the back side, or any piece of copper for that matter. Start from the outside working your way in and weld right over top of the penny/copper. Weld won't stick to the copper, and it gives you a solid back so you dont have to worry about burning through the hole. Grind off the excess weld, slap some body filler on there, and your done. :p
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 06:01 PM
Kevin45's Avatar
Just one of the guys
 

Last journal entry: Garage Toys
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Age: 58
Posts: 3,058
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Post

Mav,
If you get a wirefeed welder then get one with a gas hookup. Argon makes for a lot cleaner weld and makes it easier to weld.

Kevin
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2002, 07:01 PM
Gr8 '48 bow tie's Avatar
Be American, Buy American!
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: San Antonio, Texas SPURS COUNTRY
Age: 75
Posts: 219
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

Mav, I'm from the old school of filling holes in body and fender work. Waaay back when we removed door handles, chrome trim ect, we used lead. It is relatively easy to do and you don't put silly putty in it to cover up what you can't do. The lead comes out nice and smoothe after a little filing or light sanding. Since there is no heat applied directly to the body you do not risk warping at all. Look at some of the old lead sleds, they look nice and smoothe as a babby's bottom. BTW that is how they got the name lead sled. You must have a clean surface around the holes for the lead to adhere to. Depress the holes slightly with a hammer, Melt the lead and pour it with a spoon into the holes smooooth it, prime it and paint it, thats it you're done. Well it takes a little longer than that but you get the idea.

good luck lol Al

[ August 18, 2002: Message edited by: Gr8 '48 bow tie ]</p>
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 08-19-2002, 01:32 PM
Kevin45's Avatar
Just one of the guys
 

Last journal entry: Garage Toys
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Age: 58
Posts: 3,058
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Post

Gr8 48,
My father is a lead man from way back and I have done some also. I believe there is a little more to it than pouring lead into the hole to fill it. The paint has to be groung off to bare metal, the metal needs to be tinned. To do this you have to heat the metal with a torch. The lead has to be heated up and put onto the side and worked with a paddle and beeswax. Maybe if you have a hole right on top you can pour it but if you are filling on the side it is a whole new ballgame.

Kevin
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 08-27-2002, 12:26 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Indianola, Iowa
Posts: 60
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Post

Yup, that's about what you'll get. But if you're sure you have to take the trim off, we used to heat dam around the hole with asbestes, Of course you can't use that anymore if you want to breath long, but I'm sure there are substitutes out there. I usually just dimpled them slightly and used brass and a torch, but I don't recommend that to a novice. I could also weld up the seam in a pop can with brass with no worpage. Of course that was when cans were steel.... Keep a big sponge and water handy to keep everthing as cool as possible, but don't shrink it too much. Kinda touch and go...............
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Body - Exterior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Basic of Basics" Welding - How do I repair body panels? Centerline Body - Exterior 33 03-31-2014 09:45 AM
Welding info Kevin45 Body - Exterior 10 08-26-2011 08:09 AM
welder reccomendations? rally4x4racer Garage - Tools 32 10-14-2008 09:00 PM
Parasol Metal body filler. x711 Body - Exterior 16 02-14-2006 09:47 AM
Got a welding coach cboy General Rodding Tech 61 10-28-2005 09:03 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.