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adtkart 11-22-2004 06:14 PM

Wrong career
 
Several years ago, I had to put an addition on my house. It was 16x24, with a bedroom, bathroom and laundry room. It cost me about $18000 total to do it. Yesterday, I got a visit from a guy that was giving me a price on an addition for my garage. The addition was to be 16 X 24 also. He told me that it would cost $23000. Evidently I picked the wrong career. Doing some quick figuring this morning, I figured that the materials would cost about $3500 plus concrete. That is one hell of a mark up for a job that should take about 2 days after the concrete is down. Now I wish I had gone into construction. It's not that I don't know how to do the work. I have build several garages in the past. I just can't physically do some of it anymore. With prices like that, I may have to figure it out though.

helrazr3 11-22-2004 06:26 PM

dont forget the cost of insurance and things like that not all the money goes into the pocket. i'm not saying that he won't make a good days pay for it but there are more things to consider than stock price:cool:

Kevin45 11-22-2004 06:36 PM

For that kind of money I'd damn near drive to Virginia and build it for you. I have $11g's in mine and it's a 28' x 32' with a 6' overhang front and side. That included insulation in the walls and drywalled and all wiring. Most of my price was foundation and driveway. A neighbor wanted one built about the size of mine and was quoted $32g's from one contractor and $17g's from another for the same plan. Huge difference. One thing is...shop around. Check some of the smaller contractor / remodelers for prices. Also piece it out and don't get one person to do it all. A person that does nothing but foundations will give you a better price than a contractor that has to subcontract the foundation out. When they subcontract out they take the price it is going to cost them and then add to it.

adtkart 11-22-2004 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by helrazr3
dont forget the cost of insurance and things like that not all the money goes into the pocket. i'm not saying that he won't make a good days pay for it but there are more things to consider than stock price:cool:
Believe me, I know about the costs of running a business. I also know when I am getting the business. For that prive, I should be able to have my old garage torn down and a new one built in it's place to make up the size. What aggravates me the most is that it is the son of my neighbor. The neighbor got upset when I had the addition put on the house, because I didn't give his son a chance to bid on it. I am going to get some more bids. If someone doesn't give me something I consider reasonable, I'll have to do it myself.

julmer 11-22-2004 08:58 PM

I'm doing a 16 x 20 addition to the back of my garage to use as a storage area. I'm subcontracting the monolithic slab and using factory built trusses. My father-in-law and I are doing the rest of the labor. I'll have just about $5000 total in it.

adtkart 11-23-2004 06:22 PM

I guess this weekend, I will be going and checking prices on materials. I don't do concrete work, but have someone that I am sure I can have do that. I can't physically do the roofing because of back problems. I have a brother-in-law that needs money, so I can probably get him to do that. I'll just have to tell him how to do it. I can get the shell up in a weekend, and the sideing the next weekend by myself. I have personally built 2 26' X 22' barn type garages, single handed. I also designed a garage for a friend, and helped him build it. It does take alittle longer working by myself, but I don't have to waste time telling someone else how to do things the way I want them. The only concern that I have is doing the framing on the roof. I figure on getting the pre-fab trusses, but have to connect to the original roof at 90 degrees, and have never done that. The rest is a piece of cake.

julmer 11-23-2004 10:29 PM

It's got to be quite a bit cheaper to run the project yourself and just sub out the stuff that you can't handle. I could have done the concrete work but it's just too labor intensive for me at this point so I just sub'ed it. There is a crane that has been sitting idle for several weeks at a house und er construction only a couple of blocks from me. I'm going to offer them some fast cash if I can drive it 2 blocks and set trusses for an hour.

daimon1054 11-24-2004 09:34 AM

Concrete is a pain and a lot of work but you can save money. Set all of the forms yourself and have it ready to pour. I did a 20X80 driveway to a 24X24 slab and when I had it ready I drove around and found some guys working a slab in the area. I asked if he would do the pour he looked at the job and said $300 bucks for all the labor. I negociated my slab price on my own to get the best deal. I ended up saving over 50% on the deal had I had someone do it all.
Also the price for an unfinnished garage is way to high. If you know what you are doing then call the unemployment office and have them send you laborers and let them do the heavy lifting for a few hours at min wage then send them home.

Kevin45 11-24-2004 02:59 PM

Quote:

I figure on getting the pre-fab trusses, but have to connect to the original roof at 90 degrees, and have never done that. The rest is a piece of cake.
Not as hard as it looks. The first time I did it I really wasn't quite sure until I cut the first rafter. Piece of cake. For example...on a 4:12 pitch roof you set your circular saw at an 18 degree angle, then you cut across your rafter at an 18 degree angle. Or get a set of clamps that goes on your framing square. One clamps at 4" and the other clamps at 12" and when you lay the square on your rafter and butt it against the clamps it automatically gives you your angle. Cut along this line with your circular saw tilted and you are good to go. The only other thing you need to do first is fasten your rafter at the edge of your existing garage. Run your ridge pole / rafter / beam back and make sure it is leveled. Then snap a line from the back edge of the ridge beam down to the edge of your rafter/truss. Measure back from the rafter/truss every 2' center to center and when you measue down to your snap line...that is the length of your rafter. I'm sure that when you get ready to do it that you can find a roofer to show you how to cut the first one. After that they are a piece of cake. And don't let them BS you that it is an area of high skill or they'll try to really take you. A friend of mine added a room onto his house, hired a guy to cut the rafters back into the roof, charged him something like $500 to cut the rafters and sheet it. These guys were supposingly roofing pro's. When I looked at it after they were all finished (and paid), damned if they didn't cut the rafter angles that lay on the roof opposite, so all they had was an edge sitting on the roof and not the 2x flat on the roof. It worked for no more distance that it was but it was not right.

adtkart 11-24-2004 07:50 PM

Well.... I'm going to try to get some plans drawn up, and check on a permit. I am not sure, but know that there is a limit on how long the rafters can be if they are 2X4. The trusses are allowed to be 2x4 if they are pre-fabbed, but the others may have to be 2X6 for the first 1 or 2. My brother built a garage a while back, and used trusses. The people he got them told him to call when he was ready for them. They delivered them and put them on top of the walls for him, since they had a crane on the truck that delivered them. I watched the guy cut the rafters for the addition on my house a few years ago. He ripped thru them like he was cutting straight cuts. I guess when you do them all of the time, they get easy to figure out. Since I'll only have 10 of them to cut, total, It won't really kill me if I screw up one or 2, specially since they get shorter as you go along.

All I can say is that the building boom will end someday, and these people will wish they had given a reasonable price for this job. I'm just not used to being willing to spend money, and not being able to find someone to take it.

CET 12-03-2004 12:47 AM

Re: Wrong career
 
Quote:

Originally posted by adtkart
Several years ago, I had to put an addition on my house. It was 16x24, with a bedroom, bathroom and laundry room. It cost me about $18000 total to do it. Yesterday, I got a visit from a guy that was giving me a price on an addition for my garage. The addition was to be 16 X 24 also. He told me that it would cost $23000. Evidently I picked the wrong career. Doing some quick figuring this morning, I figured that the materials would cost about $3500 plus concrete. That is one hell of a mark up for a job that should take about 2 days after the concrete is down. Now I wish I had gone into construction. It's not that I don't know how to do the work. I have build several garages in the past. I just can't physically do some of it anymore. With prices like that, I may have to figure it out though.
I had a water heater installed last week. It cost me $275 for the labour. It only took the guy 53 minutes to do the job.

He thought the $60/hr I charge for computer repair was way too high though.

Quote:

Originally posted by daimon1054
Concrete is a pain and a lot of work but you can save money. Set all of the forms yourself and have it ready to pour. I did a 20X80 driveway to a 24X24 slab and when I had it ready I drove around and found some guys working a slab in the area. I asked if he would do the pour he looked at the job and said $300 bucks for all the labor. I negociated my slab price on my own to get the best deal. I ended up saving over 50% on the deal had I had someone do it all.
Also the price for an unfinnished garage is way to high. If you know what you are doing then call the unemployment office and have them send you laborers and let them do the heavy lifting for a few hours at min wage then send them home.

I did the same but traded my auto repair skills to a guy that had concrete experience. It saved me big $$ and only took me less than 4 hours to fix his car. I fixed another guys PS2 and he helped also.

mk8-78tabubba 12-11-2004 03:29 PM

be a firefighter

jeeptuff 12-12-2004 06:16 PM

Have a party
 
I'm sure you have to know some people that have some carpenter skills. Get them all together to give you a hand, afterwards fire up the BBQ, grab a keg, feed them and drink beer. I have done this a few times and also helped others that had helped me. I did it when I set grade on the driveway, we had a paving party(driveway is 1/4 mile long and 14 foot wide, and is nice I work for a paving company!!). $23,000 sounds awefully steep.

adtkart 12-18-2004 08:03 PM

Well.... I got 2 more prices today. One guy only told me it would be mid-teens, minimum. The other guy told me that it would be cheaper to biuld a separate building. He wants $14400 for a 16X24 separate building. He said it would be considerably more if it was attached. He was from a company that specializes in garages. They used to be one of the biggest garage builders in the area, and had really reasonable prices. He told me to shop around, and he would be waiting for my call. I guess since they are all so busy from the huricane a year ago, they can charge what they want.

I also talked to my brother today.He said that if I get the concrete done, and do the rest, he would get someone to help him do the roof.

I will have my addition for considerable less than they want to do it!

flathead 01-15-2005 01:14 PM

Prices
 
Isn't it a shame what has happened to this country? When I had my 40 x 60, 14 ft to the eves shop built in the mid '80's it cost $13,800, including the concrete.
Jim


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