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Old 08-25-2010, 07:54 AM
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York 206 R12 Compressor Questions

i bought a new york 206 which i plan on installing soon. it has some pressure in it which surprised me and i also assume some mineral oil.

#1.how much oil and what type should i add to the compressor in my 62 chevy truck? mineral oil?

#2. the valve arrangement on this new compressor is different from my old one. what is the purpose of those 'extra' valves that turn open/closed?

thanks!
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tab
#1.how much oil and what type should i add to the compressor in my 62 chevy truck? mineral oil?
There should be 7/8" to 1-3/8" of oil if the compressor is mounted vertically, or 15/16" to 1-3/16" if mounted horizontally. To check it, you need to make a dipstick to reach in through the oil filler plug on the compressor.

Note: the bend is 110 degrees, not 180


Quote:
Originally Posted by tab
#2. the valve arrangement on this new compressor is different from my old one. what is the purpose of those 'extra' valves that turn open/closed?
The valves serve a couple of purposes:

Front seating the valves (valve stem turned all the way out) completely closes off the service ports. Since the old systems didn't have Schrader valves in the service ports, being able to close off the service ports was crucial - otherwise you could not remove your service hoses after you charge the system without losing all your refrigerant.

Back seating the valves (valve stem turned all the way in) isolates the compressor from the rest of the system, and allows you to do various diagnostic tests on the compressor, and also allows you to remove and replace the compressor without losing the entire refrigerant charge.

The valves should be mid-seated when you charge the system then front seated before you remove the charging manifold hoses.

Hope this helps...

Last edited by Joe G; 08-25-2010 at 05:15 PM.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:29 AM
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joe: it helps A LOT! thanks so much.

just one more question; what should my gauge readings be when this thing is fully charged in upper 90 heat?

tim
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Old 08-27-2010, 06:25 PM
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You are welcome, Tim, glad I could help.

I would charge it until the low side doesn't go below about 30 psi with the engine running at 1500 rpm, the fan on hi and the AC controls on max. Better yet, find the sight glass (should be on or near the dryer) and charge it until the stream of bubbles just barely disappears.

Also, before you charge it, I would draw down the system with a vacuum pump (to 29"Hg or less) for at least an hour to remove as much moisture as possible. If the system has been open for more than a few hours, I would leave the vacuum pump running for several hours, and/or replace the dryer.

Any air or moisture in the system will cause problems. At over $30/lb for refrigerant, it pays to make sure an R-12 system is as dry as possible before charging it.

Good luck.
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