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Old 11-16-2004, 10:09 PM
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Your not the hose? Dammit.....

K,

Bare with me and keep in mind the '?' prolly pretains to fuel lines (maybe ventalation).

So I bought my '71 Chevelle 3 1/2 yrs ago for $800 and soon after blew a hole the size of my fist thru one of the cylinder walls, bent a rod and piston crumbled like a cookie (suprised, I didnt think so). Moving on, I bought a New 383 and 700r4 that I just put in. I'm starting to rebuild the puzzle.

The older motor had a mechanical fuel pump. The layout was typical on passenger side = tank ------------ filter---pump---CARB , with NO return coming of the pump (and so I assume no return fuel line). But right before I dropped the new motor I notice on hose that was ODDLY on the driver side kinda laying hidden tucked to the frame , end of it was cut but not clean or even. Wondering what this hose was, I put my fist between the hose and my mouth and blew to see if the was any resistance, not much but a little. Not knowing what it was I tried to inhail, thats when I could taste gas fumes. So clearly the hose goes back the gas tank...... If there is no return line, why the hose on the driver side going to the fuel tank? Is this some kind of vent I dont know about? I'm going to be using a electric pump w/ my new motor (no return). If this a return can I just plug the hose, should I do something else?

Any HELP would be great (sorry for the length, I figured the more you knew the better)

Stroke

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Old 11-16-2004, 10:33 PM
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That was part of the evaporative emissions control (charcoal cannister). You can plug it if you like.
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Old 11-16-2004, 10:45 PM
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So I can just put like a spill over container on the end of it?

Stroke
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Old 11-17-2004, 09:58 AM
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Yes

If you do plug it, use a vented gas cap. Or suffer strange problems with pressure build up in the tank.
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Old 11-17-2004, 12:06 PM
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As johnsongrass1 said, it is basically acting as a vent. No fuel should "spill" out of it. If you plug it and don't have a vented cap or another vent to the tank, you will create a vacuum when pumping fuel and that will create problems (stalling, car won't start, etc..). Air has to be able to replace the fuel as it leaves the tank. On the other hand when it gets hot and the fuel vapors expand they will have no place to go, this will cause problems as well.

Bottom line you need a vent in the system, either use that line as the vent or install another type of vent.

Royce
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Old 11-17-2004, 12:10 PM
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Thanks Royce,

Yor advice is well respected. I'm greatfull to have your knowledge available.

Stroke
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Old 11-17-2004, 12:22 PM
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If you look at the old carb on the blowed up engine there should be a cap or the other end of that hose still attached to the base of the carb. The charcoal canister is not necessary to run your engine, it has nothing to do with the fuel delivery system. Is an earily attempt at emissions control...can be thrown away and the line plugged at the carb.


Tazz


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