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Old 08-30-2017, 09:13 PM
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3M 01991 green corp grinding wheel.

I bought a 5 pack of these wheels to see how well they worked for me. I really like them but I am finding the wear on the wheels is fast and I went through 4 wheels quickly. The 5th one took flying lessons when I did not get the arbor tight. The wheel is still missing in my shop. I will find it some day.

Anyway I am looking for a lower cost per 5 pack or maybe even a 10 or 20 pack than what I see on fleabay.

The 01991 wheels work good but I would even consider any other 3 inch by 3/16 or better wheel but I am drawing a blank..

Any deals out there let me know please..

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Old 09-01-2017, 02:01 AM
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Cool

Here's a decent deal on a 5 pack..........

3M 01990 Green Corps 3 x 1/16 x 3/8 Inch Cut-Off Wheel, 5 per Pack | eBay

They sell at the local auto body supply shop for $30 a 5 pack. The best deal you're gonna find on Ebay is around $3 per disc. The Green Corps are without a doubt, the best if you're cutting sheet metal.

You don't really need 1991s. I bought 20 1988s for $47 off Ebay. About $2.30 per disc. The difference is 1991s are rated for 35,000 rpm and the 1988s are rated for 25,000 rpm. Make sure whatever you buy are the Green Corps and not the general purpose cutting discs. Those really wear fast!
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Old 09-01-2017, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rip VW View Post
I bought a 5 pack of these wheels to see how well they worked for me. I really like them but I am finding the wear on the wheels is fast and I went through 4 wheels quickly. The 5th one took flying lessons when I did not get the arbor tight. The wheel is still missing in my shop. I will find it some day.

Anyway I am looking for a lower cost per 5 pack or maybe even a 10 or 20 pack than what I see on fleabay.

The 01991 wheels work good but I would even consider any other 3 inch by 3/16 or better wheel but I am drawing a blank..

Any deals out there let me know please..
I have bought some generic off brand 01991's. Yes they are cheaper but They definitely do not last as long.

I believe you will find that the longevity of the wheels depends somewhat on your work style. If you really bare down on them, the pressure and the heat will really make them wear quickly. I tend to run them a little slower and let them cut at their own speed.

Personally, I find they are the best out there for finishing the butt welds in autobody work. Finish off with a 50 grit roloc and you are "there"!

John
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Old 09-01-2017, 06:20 PM
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I totally agree with John ,you use the stone for the welds and the ro-loc's for the sheetmetal. I see guys all the time trying to grind welds with the rol-locs abrasive discs and just tossing them out, one after the other, they simply wont last grinding welds but that stone seams to last forever on them. Sometimes the arbour gets bent and they wear faster but all in all these things are the best. Unfortunetlly they come at a cost and cant be substituted we just got to live with it. trust me, I'd be using another brand if I could. My butt itches every time I hear 3-M.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evintho View Post
Here's a decent deal on a 5 pack..........

3M 01990 Green Corps 3 x 1/16 x 3/8 Inch Cut-Off Wheel, 5 per Pack | eBay

They sell at the local auto body supply shop for $30 a 5 pack. The best deal you're gonna find on Ebay is around $3 per disc. The Green Corps are without a doubt, the best if you're cutting sheet metal.

You don't really need 1991s. I bought 20 1988s for $47 off Ebay. About $2.30 per disc. The difference is 1991s are rated for 35,000 rpm and the 1988s are rated for 25,000 rpm. Make sure whatever you buy are the Green Corps and not the general purpose cutting discs. Those really wear fast!

Actually there is 1 big difference between the 1990 and 1991. The 1991's are 3/16 of an inch thick and the wheel was designed for weld grinding. The 1990 wheel is designed as a cut off wheel. It is only 1/16 of an inch thick.

Last week when I started looking for the 1991's I was not paying enough attention and when clicking back and forth I thought I found a bargain on 1991's. I ordered two 5 packs for like $38.00. When they arrived imagine my surprise when I saw they were thin cut off wheels and not the thick weld grinding stones. I checked the invoice and it clearly said 1990 NOT 1991. I checked my online order and sure enough I ordered 1990's.

So setting in the shop today I got this wild idea to try stacking 2 1990's together on my mandrel. I was amazed at how well they worked. The two 1990's together worked as good as the 1991's.

For what I spent on the 1990 wheels it is a wash. I would have paid the same basic price for 5 of the 91's. Pairing up 2 disks I get 5 doubles.. or 5 homemade wheels.

I think the other guys really said it all when the said the 1991 disk is an awesome quick wheel. They are however, priced like all the other good tools-good product. Big $$$$$$$.

I will keep looking till I find a better price but in the mean time I have 5 homemade disks and 2 1991's hiding somewhere in my shop. (I hate that when you lay something down and then forget where it is... Seems to be happening more and more lately!!

Thanks evintho for your info. I do appreciate it.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:16 PM
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Hello John and Mr deadbodyman,

You guys were right on telling me about the 1991 Green core. I had been using my 4 1/2 angle grinder and it was Not fun. Also with the 4 1/2 1 wrong move and zip there is another hole. The first time I used a 1991 I was sold..

My biggest problem when I am welding and grinding right now is I get in to much of a hurry. I need to relax and not rush the process. When welding it is just 1 more tack here or there and then I screw up and make a bigger mess. Oh well I am slowly learning.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:27 PM
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RIP, careful stacking them. I never heard of or tried that but hope you do this on a guarded tool. Did not speak up on the weld grinding discs because I was not aware that any other brand offered that thickness. Maybe I have seen Norton's, don't recall. At any rate yeah, I concur with the collective response you got here. Doing plug welds they last a long long time. On long jagged seams, I have found that less wheel wear occurs if at the beginning I orient the wheel parallel to the seam for the first and worst part, then switch to a 45 degree angle or so. Or a 24 grit roloc to get started can be nice. If I start at an angle I chew off more wheel. The rolocs are great for after the wheel. I gotta grab what's in the cabinet on a given day and don't track prices but can get by with regular thickness cutoff wheels for weld grinding any day.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:05 AM
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RIP, careful stacking them. I never heard of or tried that but hope you do this on a guarded tool. Did not speak up on the weld grinding discs because I was not aware that any other brand offered that thickness. Maybe I have seen Norton's, don't recall. At any rate yeah, I concur with the collective response you got here. Doing plug welds they last a long long time. On long jagged seams, I have found that less wheel wear occurs if at the beginning I orient the wheel parallel to the seam for the first and worst part, then switch to a 45 degree angle or so. Or a 24 grit roloc to get started can be nice. If I start at an angle I chew off more wheel. The rolocs are great for after the wheel. I gotta grab what's in the cabinet on a given day and don't track prices but can get by with regular thickness cutoff wheels for weld grinding any day.
Grinding welds with a cut off wheel is extremely dangerous never ever do that.
A friend of mine didn't listen and had to go to the ER to get a broken piece of a cut off wheel out of his chest. It would have been even worse if he hurt someone else.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:50 AM
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Grinding welds with a cut off wheel is extremely dangerous never ever do that.
A friend of mine didn't listen and had to go to the ER to get a broken piece of a cut off wheel out of his chest. It would have been even worse if he hurt someone else.
I tell my friends to use guarded tools and keep their whole body out of the plane where the disc is spinning. Just like using a chainsaw, you don't line your face up with the chain.
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Old 09-02-2017, 11:17 PM
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You guys make very good suggestions. Yeah I learned the hard way to respect all grinding wheels. I had one shatter and hit me in the face when I was 20 yr old. It split my upper lip completely open from the lip to the bottom of my nose. I had to eat through a straw for a lone time and it was very painful!!! Yeah not good to be inline with the wheel.

I noted the tip, someone said about starting inline with the weld. That may be why I burned the first couple wheels up. My main problem is getting in a hurry and wanting to remove maximum material in minimum time. I have to keep reminding myself to slow down then my inner self say "SLOW down?, Nope" and away goes the vicious circle. I am getting better at it.
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Old 09-03-2017, 01:09 AM
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All in technique

Rip, My $.02 is to use these with more wheel speed and very light pressure. When cutting, I work in about a 6 to 8 in area and make several "Grooving" passes Never plunge into the sheet with depth as this causes bind and slows speed of wheel. When grinding in an accessible area I will use a 4 1/2 wheel to start and take about 20% or so down. still working in 6 to 8 in area at a time. This will minimize heat effects. (more damage is done by improper grinding than welding) Then I go to the 3m discs you mentioned and finish to about 90% and then I use 50 grit Norton roloc type discs (orange grit) I also like worth brand (kwik cut) they have a hard plastic back and can be trimmed down. To trim then down (both types) I use a small pocket screw driver or an awl and lightly press on the back of the disc while it is spinning on the grinder. (hold it low to the floor and angled slightly. I also change my backing pads ( I have 3 ranging from (3" to 1 3/4) I will save them until I have several to cut down and then change to smaller backing pad. I like the 50 grit used to use 36 but 50 seems to cut nearly as fast and lasts longer for me. Hope this helps.
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:36 AM
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Theres a dollars worth for .02 from 35 prog
The 4 1/2 grinding stone is great for getting the majority of the welds down level but a little proud then the smaller stone on the die grinder to finish grinding. I really like the angle die grinders for the rol-locs. I too trim them down as they wear, its like a new grinding disc every time you trim, I trim off a little less than a 1/4 " at a time and I'll trim them all the way down to the plastic backer. I go one further though, I have a dedicated angle grinder for each so I never have to waste time looking for the tools to change the pad and changing the pad takes a lot of time too I just pop off the rol-loc and screw it into the angle grinder that has the next smaller pad, I trim off the old disc with an old pair of scissor type tin snips that I've use for years on all grinding dics big and small. Thanks to HF I can afford to buy a bunch of these angle die grinders at about 10.00 ea none of these angle grinders have ever had anything but that one rol-loc backing pad in them. I've had very good luck with these all of them have lasted well over 3 yrs and still going strong at the body shop. I get ALL my die grinders at HF
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Old 09-03-2017, 01:38 PM
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You know speaking of Rolocs, Is there any trick to removing the used up roloc from the pad. I don't tighten the roloc when starting I just turn to contact then go but when it comes to taking it off in the end It is not the easiest disc to un screw. I found the 3 inch Rolocs come off a lot easier than the 2 inch. Any secrets to removing the the 2 inch disks without busting all your fingernails. I have found if I place the die grinder with roloc facing in the palm of my gloved hand and attempt to unscrew the roloc. This is a 50 50 success rate. sometimes I have to lift the edge of the roloc with a putty knife and grab the edge. That works good but I hate to damage the pad.

So what ya got for a good tip?
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:53 AM
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kind of like your glove

Rip, I use a "sacrificial" piece of leather that is also used over my sand filled beater bag. This piece of leather is smooth on one side and raw or ruff, sort of like ruff suede. This rough side of the leather works better than smoother leather. I have also used arc welding gloves. This is not 100% cure all but works 90% of the time. I find that when the discs are stuck, it is a result of being "aggressive" with my grinding. Something I have done when having some help in the shop, (my nephew) is to turn the air pressure down to 90 to 100 psi. That way when getting aggressive, it will bog down the grinder slightly.
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Old 09-04-2017, 02:04 PM
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RIP, honestly I don't have trouble with that. If I did I'd get my table knife behind it and mash thumb against disc face to grip it. This is using 3M and Norton discs on a pad from the Snap On truck. Even with my airbag hand they usually come right off so maybe 35prog is onto something. Frankly I don't like that type of disc, they make so much heat and if your tool decelerates quickly enough they can be thrown off if not tightened securely. Rolocs are a nutritious part of a complete weld grinding arsenal but I do see guys rely on them too much for my liking. I do most of the metal work in the shop and get maybe 2 or 3 discs out of every box of 2" we go through. A careful guy can use 5" grinder discs for a lot of the work but everybody wants to use twist lock discs.
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