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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2008, 07:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lapersinger
So What King Of 377 You Gonna Build? Street Or Strip? Whats The Combo You Gonna Use? Im Getting Ready To Build Another, Just Wanted To See If You Had Any Good Notes.
i'm thinkin' a brodix top end kit (heads+intake) and an 850 dbl pumper.
haven't decided on a cam yet, heell, i ain't got a block yet!
i want to stay internally ballanced, easier to swap around flywheels and i've got a scheiffer aluminum just waiting
don't know about compression either as i AM thinking E85.....
weight of the car?
i dunno, whats a 69 american 2dr sedan weigh?
(and THAT'S a whole different matter....)

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2008, 08:12 AM
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Good luck with E85.

E85 is a corrosive fuel at best. You need a plastic tank and every thing the fuel touches needs to be plastic or stainless steel. I hate to see what it does to a brand new 850 carb, and a aluminum intake, and heads. On e85 cars the engines have plastic intakes, stainless injectors, stainless lines, plastic tanks, stainless fuel pumps, and there is also a sensor in the fuel line that has a open circuit in the fuel to sense resistance in the the fuel. E85 has less resistance due to its corrosive nature. So when the computer senses the different fuel it can make for a richer adjustment. You can actually clean the brake dust off of aluminum wheels with e85, just like hydr. acid.

Ohh and the lubricating property of e85 is so bad in the sevice manuals for the cars they actually allow for certain amount of oil consumption..
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Old 06-13-2008, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n-gin
Good luck with E85.

E85 is a corrosive fuel at best. You need a plastic tank and every thing the fuel touches needs to be plastic or stainless steel. I hate to see what it does to a brand new 850 carb, and a aluminum intake, and heads. On e85 cars the engines have plastic intakes, stainless injectors, stainless lines, plastic tanks, stainless fuel pumps, and there is also a sensor in the fuel line that has a open circuit in the fuel to sense resistance in the the fuel. E85 has less resistance due to its corrosive nature. So when the computer senses the different fuel it can make for a richer adjustment. You can actually clean the brake dust off of aluminum wheels with e85, just like hydr. acid.

Ohh and the lubricating property of e85 is so bad in the sevice manuals for the cars they actually allow for certain amount of oil consumption..

you know this by experience?
why i ask is because i haven't seen an iron head in so long on a late model i don't think i can lift one anymore
they DID NOT start using plastic plenums for this reason AND the intakes themselves are aluminum.
they've been using plastic tanks since the 70's......
fuel cells are plastic for the most part (yes, i know about aluminum and steel ones)

you sure you're not thinking about methanol?
that stuff is "harsh".....

btw plenty of alky carbs out there, too.

not looking for a wizzin' match but there's a few things that ain't right with your statement...
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 06-14-2008, 09:30 AM
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I have worked on a few E85 cars and this is true.
The fuel is injected into the cylinders and I have yet to see a e85 car with a aluminum intake, there might be one out there but like I said the fuel is injected into the cylinder some might get on the head a little but not much.

The thing is you said you were going to a carb, so that tells me the fuel has to sit in the carb and then tummble down the intake/head.

I started getting more cars like this in my shop so I had to read up on the stuff and go to a few classes.
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Old 06-14-2008, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n-gin
I have worked on a few E85 cars and this is true.
The fuel is injected into the cylinders and I have yet to see a e85 car with a aluminum intake, there might be one out there but like I said the fuel is injected into the cylinder some might get on the head a little but not much.

The thing is you said you were going to a carb, so that tells me the fuel has to sit in the carb and then tummble down the intake/head.

I started getting more cars like this in my shop so I had to read up on the stuff and go to a few classes.
1st i've heard of this BUT it doesn't surprise me.
i haven't seen a bunch of E85 vehicles come thru the door that have been using it so MY experience is really limited..

i was hoping it (E85)was i little more "user friendly"....
i don't want to go thru the hassle of wd40'ing everything after a drive.....ok, now it's a gas burner!

see? i'm easy...
thanks for the info, finally somebody gave me a reason NOT to use it that makes sence.
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Old 06-17-2008, 01:53 PM
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$100 bucks, thats a good deal.. 4 bolt mains are good,if your in a circle track area you could double your money or more, alot of the circle track guys like the 4bolt blocks...


the 4bolt issue, some like them and some dont, use studs not bolts


if it needs total rebuilding i would destroke it to a 377, they make awesome engines...
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 06-18-2008, 07:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bru
$100 bucks, thats a good deal.. 4 bolt mains are good,if your in a circle track area you could double your money or more, alot of the circle track guys like the 4bolt blocks...


the 4bolt issue, some like them and some dont, use studs not bolts


if it needs total rebuilding i would destroke it to a 377, they make awesome engines...

377 what crank will I have to put in there and how much rpm can it handle. How would building a 377 measure up to a 400?
I was thinking I would be turning 6200 rpm and around 475 hp. These numbers are extreme, due to if I'm under that number I know I'll be all right.
Figure 6000 rpm and 425 hp, these numbers are max for more realistic numbers.
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n-gin
377 what crank will I have to put in there and how much rpm can it handle. How would building a 377 measure up to a 400?
I was thinking I would be turning 6200 rpm and around 475 hp. These numbers are extreme, due to if I'm under that number I know I'll be all right.
Figure 6000 rpm and 425 hp, these numbers are max for more realistic numbers.
377= 400 block and 350 crank (requires main saddle spacers and extra balance consideration)

There ain't no replacement for displacement. 23 cubes = 23+ horsepower.
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