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Old 12-28-2013, 10:10 PM
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It's gorgeous. I've done it over silver paint but with not-so-cool results. Doing table top epoxy directly over aluminum, letting that harden, then sanding allows for candy to look just as awesome.

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Old 12-30-2013, 10:45 AM
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Something came up recently that reminded me of why using something like this dye can be such a disaster. Have you ever wrote with a Sharpie on something then painted over it? It is amazing, you could have a car in the booth with something written on it with Sharpie, it was wiped off or sanded "off" leaving a trace amount on the panel. You could paint over it with three coats of Acrylic enamel SS and walk out of the booth. Go back in there later and you would swear someone wrote OVER the acrylic enamel with a Sharpie! That stuff bleeds like crazy through paint. So is this dye any different? It sure looks like an ink to me?

It's good to test, I understand that is what you are doing, you didn't go out and paint a car with it, you are thinking about it. Just thought I would toss out a bit more info is all.

Brian
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:05 AM
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Ah, but I've already got my sample with clear over it that's several months old with no bleed through.
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:22 PM
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The testing does sound like it has went well.

Brian
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:29 PM
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How long will it last is the big one. I did a bike in florescent colors years ago, before there was anything available from the big boys.

I used hobby paint, out of an aerosol can and then applied urethane clear over that. I am not sure when I saw the bike upside down (changing the tire) months later, maybe a year I don't remember. But there was a VERY noticeable difference between the top and the bottom as far as how sharp the color was, it was fading fast on the top. But a few years later the color was GONE, to damn near white! Now I think HOK florescent isn't much better, it fades too of course.

Brian
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:36 PM
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My next test will be putting it in candy carrier, then spraying clear on top of that. The office window of my shop faces south, and I will put the sample in the window while keeping my control sample in a drawer. I'll compare them after a week, then two weeks, and so on. If the color stays after a month of exposure to direct sunlight, then I'm good. I can't think of another way of testing that is faster.
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Old 12-30-2013, 01:36 PM
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Sounds like fun to me Call Barry at SPI for his input as he is the paint expert. My take would be to use his intercoat clear to mix the dye and then shoot universal clear over that for the UV protection.

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Old 12-30-2013, 04:55 PM
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I love Southern Polyurethanes. I'll contact Barry over there. I do like the candy carrier, though, but I do have some HOK Intercoat Clear, so I can also test it with that.
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:24 PM
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At the rolling mill we stenciled aluminum with either blue or red ink which was carried in a denatured alcohol. While it was wet it was beautiful, but dried to a dull color. Never thought about trying to spray it and clear coat it

Been to darn long ago to remember any brand names.
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Old 12-30-2013, 05:49 PM
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There are several brands of layout dye. I'm using Dykem. It comes in red or blue and its purpose is to do exactly what you used it for on the aluminum.

It also makes a great guide coat for sanding. Just put a paper towel on the top of the bottle like you would if getting a cotton ball wet with rubbing alcohol. Then dip the towel into a cup of acetone and wipe onto the 2K primer. It's cleaner than using rattle can guide coat and dries immediately. I've seen boat manufacturers use it like crazy in their repair and refinishing shops.

It is such a brilliant color with clear over it. My biggest concern is the effect of UV light on it, which is why I'm going to have to perform more tests and put them in a window. However, windows have argon in them but it's the best way I can do it since I'm not going to leave it outside or buy an artificial UV lamp.
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Old 01-02-2014, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krash View Post
There are several brands of layout dye. I'm using Dykem. It comes in red or blue and its purpose is to do exactly what you used it for on the aluminum.

It also makes a great guide coat for sanding. Just put a paper towel on the top of the bottle like you would if getting a cotton ball wet with rubbing alcohol. Then dip the towel into a cup of acetone and wipe onto the 2K primer. It's cleaner than using rattle can guide coat and dries immediately. I've seen boat manufacturers use it like crazy in their repair and refinishing shops.

It is such a brilliant color with clear over it. My biggest concern is the effect of UV light on it, which is why I'm going to have to perform more tests and put them in a window. However, windows have argon in them but it's the best way I can do it since I'm not going to leave it outside or buy an artificial UV lamp.
The ink we used for the stencillers was a different product then the Dykem that the layout guys in the machine shop used.
Have no idea if any one every tried an interchange.

I can say almost for sure there never was Dykem in the stencillers, very strict regulations about what could be used to print on aircraft metal.

Boeing,Northrup,Lockheed,Airbus,Cessna,etc. all are a bit testy about those things, LOL. We had a full time US Naval inspector onsite for many years just to keep track of these type things.
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