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Old 12-28-2019, 06:37 AM
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Air straight line sander

Anyone use this or something like it? Do you still move in a diagonal X direction? I'm having health issues and simply don't have the stamina to do all the hand sanding of the wide open areas.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006L6T2ZQ..._t1_B00004XOT5

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Old 12-28-2019, 06:46 AM
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Yes the purpose and the method are the same. Just be aware these things are heavy and if you don't have the stamina to do the long boards by hand this will quickly tax you as well...
Mark
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Old 12-28-2019, 07:34 AM
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Let me say that these Air Boards are a great tools!! I've purchased quite a few tools from Eastwood and only one had an issue, they replaced it with a new one. They do consume air, but worth the wait.

You want a double action (more efficient), piston, and aluminum frame. I read Eastwood's is double action

I used a Double action when I was in College. I painted Corvettes in my oversize garage. Was good work for very good pay. A friend of mine owned a Corvette Sales / repair shop, he sent me all his paint work.Painting isn't my occupation, but I still paint all my Cars and for friends on occasions.

I went through several manufacturers for primers, most clogged the sand paper. Also if you use body filer, be certain is it fully cured. Keep your sand paper as clear as you can. Go easy on applying pressure on the board, it takes some practice but the best way for me to get better results on areas such as quarter panels.

I sit on a Tattoo Chair (no back) that's height adjustable by a lever on the slides and on wheels. So much easier on the Back !! Plus one can slide left and right while your hands are only slightly lower or level with your shoulders.

Get and Use the correct liquid Lube and use it every day !!.

Have Fun,

Michael..
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Old 12-28-2019, 08:33 AM
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I gave up on air files a long, long time ago. In my experience, what they do best is fail. Quit working. It is a fairly self destructive tool design with reciprocating parts.

It has been a couple years since I did sanding work but when I did, and ended up in the same situation, I switched to an 8" DA. Also a heavy tool needing lots of control though. Seems like I end up using either one-handed as fatigue accumulates, and the same goes for blocks made for hand use.

I firmly believe that for shaping filler, 40 grit is the best labor saver. Just leave room to switch to 80 to refine it.

Some horizontal surfaces will let you use a 2x4 and have the board's weight apply the light pressure. Some vertical surfaces will let you use light weight thin walled round plastic tubing. If these can be easily gripped, sometimes they help reduce percieved fatigue.

The 8" DA admittedly seems like it would not cut flat. I was skeptical myself. But once you get the hang of it, an old dude with a mud hog can outright smoke a kid with pliable tendons, fresh muscle, and 80 grit on some kinda fancy store-bought block. The only drawback is theres nothing quite like an air file for roughing in a straight body line.

8" DAs are high, though. I don't know of any cheapies being made.

The way to shape mud that hurts the least, for me with a bad hand, is to use my composite (plastic) bodied HF 6" palm snder with a sharp piece of 40 grit. Knock the tops off with it, switch to 40 on a 9" Hutchins hand file. Then go to the 80 on a Durablock that most folks use from start to finish. If you have the skill (and enough feeling left in your hands), good results on large panels can be achieved this way. As long as at some point, the hand block used is of sufficient length. I used to do some of my best contouring with 4' of PVC pipe as a block, wrapped in continuous PSA 80 grit and often only grasping one end.

If I knew of ANY air file that stands up to regular prolonged usage, I would steer you to it. But I don't. So theres how I approached the same issue, with alternatives. I don't miss an air file.
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Old 12-28-2019, 08:57 AM
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I've used an air board for years. I just got a Hutchins DA air board but haven't had the chance to use it yet. From what I've heard, these do a better job in that the DA motion makes it less likely that you'll cut a groove in the finish.

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Old 12-28-2019, 02:57 PM
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Wow, that was ever weird ??

Filler & high build primer.

I only use EverCoat Fillers & Primers. Prime I use Feather Fill G2. Here is the link to their Tech Sheet, gives you all the info. Better than me typing.. EverCoat also manufacturers, spot fillers and misc odds & ends - no color or clear paints. I prefer to use the same manufacturer for my primer and fillers.

http://www.evercoat.com/images/ePIM/...5.2016-ENG.pdf

Go easy with your body hammer !! I cut the ends off a couple of mine so I can't strike the metal very hard. If you overwork your body parts, you'll create more work. This can result in needing to shrink metal with Heat, which can very easily cause even more work.

Try watching some specialty Videos on body work. Like any other Skill, it requires learning a new vocabulary, almost like a foreign language.

Find an old Fender, door, to work on. Something that you can place on a low Work Table so you can move it around in the light. I used to Whack in a good oval dent in old fenders & doors. And then think about where the metal was in Tension and Compression. I'd mark the metal with letters C & T and start my Hammer work. Of course at first I was completely Wrong. But this is fun learning because it's a low cost used part....

Good Luck.... Patience...

Michael...
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Old 12-28-2019, 04:05 PM
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Tony,

An inline sander is a fairly heavy tool but you hold it with two hands and that will minimize the load. It's pretty easy to control and will remove material fast. I start with 36 grit then jump to 80 but don't use it after that. If you're unsure, maybe you can borrow one to try it.
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Old 12-28-2019, 08:09 PM
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I have used one of the straight line air sanders, it is only good for initial knock down of filler. I dont like the noise, and prefer to use an old set of body files, I think the were for lead, but they cut all the ugly stuf down real fast. I work it when it's 3/4 cured.
Then move on to DA. I try not to mass the filler on just to save sanding.
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Old 12-29-2019, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idrivejunk View Post
I gave up on air files a long, long time ago. In my experience, what they do best is fail. Quit working. It is a fairly self destructive tool design with reciprocating parts.

It has been a couple years since I did sanding work but when I did, and ended up in the same situation, I switched to an 8" DA. Also a heavy tool needing lots of control though. Seems like I end up using either one-handed as fatigue accumulates, and the same goes for blocks made for hand use.

I firmly believe that for shaping filler, 40 grit is the best labor saver. Just leave room to switch to 80 to refine it.

Some horizontal surfaces will let you use a 2x4 and have the board's weight apply the light pressure. Some vertical surfaces will let you use light weight thin walled round plastic tubing. If these can be easily gripped, sometimes they help reduce percieved fatigue.

The 8" DA admittedly seems like it would not cut flat. I was skeptical myself. But once you get the hang of it, an old dude with a mud hog can outright smoke a kid with pliable tendons, fresh muscle, and 80 grit on some kinda fancy store-bought block. The only drawback is theres nothing quite like an air file for roughing in a straight body line.

8" DAs are high, though. I don't know of any cheapies being made.

The way to shape mud that hurts the least, for me with a bad hand, is to use my composite (plastic) bodied HF 6" palm snder with a sharp piece of 40 grit. Knock the tops off with it, switch to 40 on a 9" Hutchins hand file. Then go to the 80 on a Durablock that most folks use from start to finish. If you have the skill (and enough feeling left in your hands), good results on large panels can be achieved this way. As long as at some point, the hand block used is of sufficient length. I used to do some of my best contouring with 4' of PVC pipe as a block, wrapped in continuous PSA 80 grit and often only grasping one end.

If I knew of ANY air file that stands up to regular prolonged usage, I would steer you to it. But I don't. So theres how I approached the same issue, with alternatives. I don't miss an air file.
WORD!

I haven't had an air board in decades! Literally, since around 1985! I got my first ND900 and gave away my air board. I actually have two 8" ND900's just in case one broke, THAT is how valuable they are to me. I found I could do large panels with that tool then just fine tuning it with a hand long board, done deal. They are THE bondo tool for sure!

I did get the one Joe posted, a Hutchins 3800, it's an "orbital" long board understand. I doesn't simply go back and forth, it's an orbital like the 8" bondo hog or a 6" "DA" orbital. I use it rarely but it works real well too. I have just found that the 8" orbital is THE bondo tool.

Brian
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Old 12-29-2019, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
I got my first ND900 and gave away my air board.
Brian, do you have any experience with the IR version of the mud hog? I'm a hobbyist, not a professional, so I'll be lucky if I use it on one car a year.
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Old 12-29-2019, 11:41 PM
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If you are just a home hobbyist this actually does a pretty good job my neighbor loaned me his I did get the sandpaper from the
Sherwin Williams automotive paint store and it held up well. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Central-Pne...wAAOSwuWpdtK9p
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Old 12-30-2019, 06:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe_padavano View Post
Brian, do you have any experience with the IR version of the mud hog? I'm a hobbyist, not a professional, so I'll be lucky if I use it on one car a year.
I don't, the only one I have ever used is the ND900.

Listen, I don't mean to sound like the air board is worthless, lots of people use them, and get the job done. So it must be a "person" kinda thing. I just found the 8" hog to work much better. But the air board can be had for a lot less money!

Be sure you have the air that is needed!

Brian
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Old 01-01-2020, 07:28 PM
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My father did body work back in the fifty's with hammers, files, and lead. In the seventies he dug out his old stuff to help me with a 66 1/2 Ford Bronco. The files worked great (grate!). He showed me a lot, but I got tired of hearing "needs some work, that will show through". When done though, he finally said, looks great! Let's get it tacked, degreased, and primed. I used black lacquer paint and it worked out pretty well.
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Old 03-01-2020, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 55 Tony View Post
Anyone use this or something like it? Do you still move in a diagonal X direction? I'm having health issues and simply don't have the stamina to do all the hand sanding of the wide open areas.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006L6T2ZQ..._t1_B00004XOT5
They cut fast but if not constantly moving it around like this /// \\\ than it can give you really deep straight scratches and cause a setback. I prefer an orbital longboard, which is great for rockers, doors, and quarters and cuts more gently with a DA type scratch and not a straight line scratch, which feathers better.
A mud hog in the right hands can do wonders. It's way more versatile than a straight line sander or orbital longboard but takes a little longer to get the hang of. Once you do, it's an amazing sander.
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Old 03-02-2020, 12:42 AM
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Something you all should save.

There are tons of build tips here be sure to check this out,great tips for us DIY guys. https://www.jefflilly.com/build-tips/
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