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Old 05-14-2019, 08:21 AM
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Best shop floor for the money?

Het guys, I need some advice/opinions.

I am in the process of putting up a 30' x 60' metal building for my "dream" shop and am looking into flooring options. Without spending my entire budget on the floor covering what are my best (durability first) options based on your own observations and use?

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Old 05-14-2019, 08:46 AM
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Since we do fabrication here with welding and cutting operations I would not have anything other than concrete with a clear sealer. Best thing out there for a working shop. If you are doing a showplex for show off then there are lots of options which all cost a bunch of money and that would not make through the next week in my shop.

Just my opinion..

Sam
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Old 05-14-2019, 09:05 AM
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Thanks Sam,
Although the flex type tiles are very attractive I tend to share your thoughts on the durability of a sealed concrete floor because it will see all types of work from engine building to fabrication work. Can you tell me if your floors were done with a concrete densifier, a water repellent, or an acrylic sealer of some type?


Never knew there were so many options / choices.


Thanks again for your input,

Capt'n Jim
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Old 05-14-2019, 09:33 AM
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Mine were done with a sealer something to repel grease and oil spills. Forgot what brand I used. I also have hitch receivers installed in the floor so I have something sturdy to pull to or for fixtures. I drilled in rock anchors for my drill press and will do that for anything else I may need to be anchored such as a lift or something.

Some have come here and complained because I "ruined my floor" but then they don't work here and don't do what I do. My shop is small though..

Sam
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Old 05-14-2019, 09:33 AM
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Mine were done with a sealer something to repel grease and oil spills. Forgot what brand I used. I also have hitch receivers installed in the floor so I have something sturdy to pull to or for fixtures. I drilled in rock anchors for my drill press and will do that for anything else I may need to be anchored such as a lift or something.

Some have come here and complained because I "ruined my floor" but then they don't work here and don't do what I do. My shop is small though..

Sam
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:13 AM
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Sealed concrete for whatever little that is worth at my house. I have a ruined floor as well. I have worked in shops that had coated floors and I haven't really seen any that held up well to the abuse of jack stands, floor jacks, engine hoists, or sliding heavy objects/steel/equipment around.


It turns into a cumbersome time consuming care and effort to keep it nice when everything that needs moved needs to be picked up off the floor all they way down to the scrap metal that needs to go out and the trash. At the house I don't have a second set of hands and in a shop environment it was a productivity killer to stop another guy from working for what he or I could have dragged out the door ourselves.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:29 AM
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Both work and home shops have sealed concrete. Gas will eat at it instantly. Otherwise you can mop up any other spills. We've never resealed the floor at work, it still looks good. About once every other year I remove everything that can move in my home 24x30 shop and sweep, mop then reseal the floor. I just like seeing it look shiny, resealing isn't really needed.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:30 AM
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Agree with the above, they just don't hold up. That leaves two types of finish for the concrete, smooth or "broom" I chose the broom finish in Fla due to the wet weather. Water (or any liquid) on a smooth floor and it's slip and slide. Broom finish gives a little tooth but not so deep that the jack won't roll. Bit harder to sweep but it beats falling.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:45 PM
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I'd like a "polished" floor like at Lowes. It also takes a sealer to keep from staining and I don't know how often that is needed. The only thing I might not like about a polished floor is mentioned above, slippery when wet.
I have a two part epoxy coating on my current floor, with the little color sprinkles. That is a mistake, any tiny part you drop blends in with the color flakes. 95% of my floor, if swept and mopped looks like new after about ten years use. Although where I have jacked the car up god knows how many times in the same spot, the concrete is showing. Maybe a total of 1.5 sq. ft. It did take quite a few years to happen, and my garage is small so the jack is always within this small area. I have some of the sealant left but never got around to trying to fix that spot. (if the stuff is even any good yet?) The one other thing is when welding it will melt little spots in the epoxy. After a cleaning I don't really notice most of them, but I don't do a whole lot of welding either.
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:18 AM
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First thing is put down 1 1/2 or 2" rigid foam insulation before the pour. This will keep the floor warmer in winter and summer and prevent condensation during humid summer weather. Pitch the floor 1" per 10 feet towards drains or bay doors to provide good drainage. Talk to your concrete guy and have them add fiberglass to the mix. This will help prevent chipping when you drop things on it. Have the surface polished out with a power trowel so you get a finish like at Home depot or Lowes. Lastly when they come back the next day to cut grooves for stress cracks, have them spray a sealer that becomes part of the concrete instead of a coating. The idea is NOT to coat the concrete but to make the concrete itself as durable as possible. It's a lot cheaper and lasts. I did this in my shop 10 years ago and it still looks almost like new.
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:39 AM
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A note about concrete sealing. Nowadays they sometimes coat the concrete while it's still wet. This is not so much a finish, but to keep it wet inside the slab. To harden, concrete "cures". The longer it stays wet, the harder it cures. Once it gets dry, the curing process stops for good. But even if it dries on top you can still keep it wet since under the surface it's still wet. Fresh concrete will be greenish, "keeping it green" for a few days or up to a week (spraying it with a hose) will allow it to cure better. Sort of like quick epoxy vs slow cure epoxy. The quick stuff is never as strong as the slow cure stuff.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:48 PM
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https://www.ipaint.us/products/epoxy...190515194430:s
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Old 05-16-2019, 04:51 PM
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Guys,
Thanks for all the help, I think that this is what I have decided to go with. It seems to get pretty good reviews and claims to be;

"An industrial-grade, solvent-based, silane/siloxane sealer, Siloxa-Tek 8510 is engineered to reduce water and moisture intrusion, protect concrete from deicing salts and chloride-ion ingress, and resist staining from oil and fluids."

Anyone have any personal experience with this stuff?

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Thanks again for all the feedback,
Capt'n Jim
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:24 PM
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Sounds like good stuff, I like that it penetrates and really isn't a coating. Not cheap but not much of anything that is good is cheap.
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Old 05-17-2019, 05:09 AM
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Talk to your concrete guy. They buy the stuff by the 55 gallon drum at bulk price and it is industrial grade.
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