Can someone explain how vintage Ford discs work? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans Advertise
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Suspension - Brakes - Steering
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2019, 05:15 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 76
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Can someone explain how vintage Ford discs work?

Back in the day, every classic car I had either had drums or four piston disc calipers. Today I pulled my street rod's Mustang II brake calipers and found they have a one piece cast caliper with one large piston, bolted directly to the spindle. There are no typical guide pins that the caliper slides on. Can someone explain

1) how these brakes center and how the outer pad is able to obtain any stopping force on the rotor

2) the procedure to clean and lube the caliper and pads for proper operation
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	caliper.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	17.9 KB
ID:	441229  

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 12:14 AM
ericnova72's Avatar
More for Less Racer
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: S.W. Lower Michigan
Age: 52
Posts: 17,517
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 267
Thanked 3,158 Times in 2,648 Posts
The brake caliper is supposed to "float" sliding in and out on the wedge shape at each end of the caliper where it meets the caliper bracket on the spindle. One end will have the wedge keeper and a retainer clip in that slide area also.

Dis assemble calipers from the caliper bracket. Clean up with a wire brush and coat wedge areas of both the caliper and the caliper mounting bracket on the spindle with a thin smear of anti-seize paste so the caliper can slide.
Inner pad may need a very sparingly applied bit of anti-seize at the points the pad's steel backer fits to the ends of the caliper and to the wedge area.

Caliper has to slide so that when pressure is applied to the inner side piston it pulls the whole caliper inboard while pushing the piston out, thus pulling the outer pad to the rotor at the same time the inner pad is being pushed by the piston out to the rotor.

GM single piston caliper is the same but it slides on special shaped bolt/pins at either end of the caliper.

A lot of guys always figured Ford's wedge retainer system a real PITA and more prone to freezing up than a pin guided deal. Ford finally saw the light in 1979 or so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ericnova72 For This Useful Post:
36 sedan (03-10-2019)
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 06:44 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 76
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
I agree wholeheartedly that this design is a PITA. Since I'm planning on replacing with 11" brakes eventually , think I'll just proceed with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to mainstreetprod For This Useful Post:
36 sedan (03-10-2019)
 
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:38 AM
36 sedan's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: American Canyon, CA
Posts: 1,089
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 641
Thanked 315 Times in 251 Posts
[QUOTE=mainstreetprod;4659299Since I'm planning on replacing with 11" brakes eventually , think I'll just proceed with that.[/QUOTE]

That is exactly what I did, my only regret is that I didn't do it sooner!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 08:19 AM
Old(s) Fart
 
Last wiki edit: Wheelbase database
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,366
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 117
Thanked 617 Times in 536 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainstreetprod View Post
Today I pulled my street rod's Mustang II brake calipers and found they have a one piece cast caliper with one large piston, bolted directly to the spindle. There are no typical guide pins that the caliper slides on. Can someone explain
Yeah, look again. As noted, the caliper slides in that cast bracket, and the bracket bolts to the spindle. The caliper will come out of the cast bracket once the bracket is off the spindle. If you look closely at the photo you posted, the caliper in back does not have the bracket - only the caliper in front. This is what the bracket looks like when you slide the caliper out of it.



Millions and millions of cars use this same design, including most Hondas and Toyotas. I don't think it has an inherent flaw. It's possible that the sliding mechanism is rusted. The calipers on my 1986 Chevy one ton dually mount essentially the same way, without pins.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 08:39 AM
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: General Motors transmissions
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: near Yellowstone park
Posts: 5,472
Wiki Edits: 27

Thanks: 57
Thanked 642 Times in 540 Posts
ford calipers

From my post a couple days ago
The Ford design sliding calipers tend to rust and not slide, wear out one side of the rotor and pad, the Gm pin calipers work better but volumn is not matched. the new Mustang Gt dual piston with the GM design pin mounts work best. Some of the mustang -smaller ford forumns show how to make the Gt adaptor brackets.

There are some disc brake kits that use the granada sliding calipers and the 11 " rotors. I use a fine tooth file and dress the sliding surfaces and give a little more clearance then lube as noted in the other posts.

Ford did the Durability tests on the sliding calipers at the Arizona Proving grounds. If they would have done the test in Dearborn on city streets in the winter with all the salt and slush they probably would have dropped the design.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2019, 08:45 AM
Old(s) Fart
 
Last wiki edit: Wheelbase database
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,366
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 117
Thanked 617 Times in 536 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by timothale View Post
If they would have done the test in Dearborn on city streets in the winter with all the salt and slush they probably would have dropped the design.
I'm guessing that there aren't a lot of street rods with MII front ends driving in salty slush. In any case, a dab of anti-seize on the sliding surfaces goes a long way here. I've owned lots of vehicles with calipers that slide on the bracket as opposed to pins, and drive them in mid-Atlantic winters. Never had a problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Suspension - Brakes - Steering posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Real body and paint work. 40 Ford novafreek6872 Body - Exterior 40 07-07-2015 09:33 PM
1930 Ford Coupe Sheetmetal Work flop Body - Exterior 33 08-18-2013 06:52 PM
Wwill a 1988 sable/taurus 3.8l electric fan work for a .30 over Ford 302 Theomega76 Engine 10 09-06-2010 12:12 PM
making ford aod work in street rod? garypiatt Transmission - Rearend 3 03-16-2003 10:14 PM
Whatever happend to these guys? hot_rod_kid Hotrodders' Lounge 20 12-17-2002 09:20 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.