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Old 07-12-2019, 11:49 AM
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Drilling oil passages

(SBC Question) Any advantage to drilling out the oil passage above the cam to 1/2 inch to increase oiling to cam and mains?

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Old 07-12-2019, 11:56 AM
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Not necessary.
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Old 07-12-2019, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richiehd View Post
(SBC Question) Any advantage to drilling out the oil passage above the cam to 1/2 inch to increase oiling to cam and mains?
Will not help anything.

Even if you wanted to increase the passage, the restriction to additional flow volume to the main bearings is still the annulus groove in each cam bearing bore that is underneath the O.D. of each installed cam bearing, you would have to go in and machine each groove larger to have any more possible oil available at the bearing journal. After that, it would be the oil hole in the main bearing shell itself.
Big unnecessary waste of time here though.

If you want to spend time helping the oil system of the SBC, detail radius and flare the inlet to the block from the oil filter mount, the inlet in the rear main cap from the pump, and the groove around the mounting bolt for the pump in the top of the rear main cap, and slight radius and flare to the block to cap intersection of the main oil path from the pump.



https://imgur.com/MqEQewD

You can disassemble the pump and do the same type of mod to the outlet area from the gears into the pump mounting leg.
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Old 07-12-2019, 02:55 PM
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If you want to increase oil volume to the main bearings and decrease the oil volume to the rocker arms, you can purchase special pushrods that have a .050” oil hole in the lifter end.

In 1967-1969, I used Chevrolet fuel injection GM “edge orifice solid lifters” to restrict rocker arm oiling and will also redirect and add additional oil pressure to the main bearings. That can restrict oil flow to the rocker arms and possibly burn up stock rocker arm pivot balls. I suggest using full roller rocker arms with edge orifice solid lifters.

The use of flat tappet solid lifters can cause cam lobes to go flat on today’s lead free oils unless you have less than 120 lb seat/300 lb open spring pressure. The Chevrolet 30-30 “Soft touch” camshaft and 4.11:1 rear gears would work great with that amount of spring pressure. I have successfully used GM 3911068 valve springs (Z-28) at 80 lb seat/ 280 lb open, and the GM 30-30 camshaft with stock retainers. Now I use Comp Cams 981-16 valve springs and Comp Cams 742-16 retainers. The stock GM retainers do not fit the Comp Cams valve springs correctly.

Nowadays, you should use a roller camshaft with more than 120/300 lb spring pressure and low lead motor oil. Or use Valvoline VR1 10w30 Off Road Racing oil and risk it with a flat tappet camshaft.

As always, one thing leads to another
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Old 07-12-2019, 03:46 PM
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The SBC has a very good oiling system that Ford somehow screwed up when they copied much of it into the FE engine.


Unless you intend to run the engine at and above 6000 RPM there is nothing that need to be done.


If you're going to spin it high and run it hard Ericvova79's pump advice is most helpful on cleaning up the pump discharge port.


As far as restricting top end oiling goes that depends on the rockers. Any rocker using the ball in socket fulcrum will quickly get into trouble if you short the top end oil supply. Higher revs and stiffer springs make a poor situation worse faster. Roller trunion rockers will live on less oil. The back hand of that is the valve springs depend on oil splash for cooling so what works on one hand bites the other. There are other and perhaps better ways of putting oil on the springs but the damn oil only comes from the same source, so in that sense 'go figure' the argument.


Bogie
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Old 07-12-2019, 03:52 PM
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For goodness sake. Your insistent use of the term “ no lead gasoline “ has worn thin.

Gasoline never used any form of lead as an additive, and none of the additives used in oil are classified as leads.

The only lead in oil either got there from the fuel burned or the worn bearings.

Stop using the term before someone takes what you say as though you know what you are talking about.
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:00 PM
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All gasoline pumps until about the 1980s had a sign on them that had the following warning:

“CAUTION. Contains Lead”
In the early sixties, the EPA stepped in and started making producers continually reduce lead (ZDDP) in gasoline and oil. Valvoline VR1 Motor oil has the highest lead content of motor oils. That is why the Valvoline VR1 Motor oil containers have a disclaimer “For off road use only” on them. That makes it legal to produce and sell to the public.

I use Valvoline 10w30 All Season Motor oil in my 1962 Chevrolet w/350 CI engine. My engine does not need bone crushing valve spring pressure with a GM 3863151 “Soft Touch” RPO L79 flat tappet camshaft. Comp Cams reproduces that camshaft since it was discontinued by GM about twelve years ago. The -151 camshaft was discontinued because if your vehicle did not have 11:1 compression ratio, and with camshafts 222 degrees duration on the intake and exhaust valves, it made the SB Chevrolet engines a dog on low octane, lead free gasoline, especially if you did not have 4.11:1 rear gears. With the price of more expensive no lead gasoline nowadays, it is difficult to sell 4.11 or 4.56:1 rear gears.

Last edited by MouseFink; 07-12-2019 at 06:08 PM.
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:45 PM
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It’s better to flood the springs and work the oil returns. Spring life is much better this way.
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Old 07-12-2019, 08:19 PM
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The lead in gasoline was never ZDDP. The Z is Zinc. And ZDDP was in OIL as an extreme pressure additive. It was phased out because it was hard on the old pellet-type converters.
Stop copy and pasting the same error-filled garbage. Its not helpful. Or at least learn from your errors and do better next time?
The world didn't stop in 65. Engines changed, time marched on.
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Old 07-12-2019, 08:26 PM
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Lead added to gasoline is tetraethyllead also called TEL, chemical form (CH3CH2)4Pb. It is used as an antiknock compound, the stuff that used to be used to raise the octane rating of cheap base stock gasoline into a useful octane range. While also supplying a lubricant for exhaust valves ans seats which allowed the use of less expensive materials in valves ans simple cast iron seats in heads.


In use it fouled spark plugs quickly typically needing to be cleaned and regapped at about 5000 miles and replaced at 10,000 intervals. It did this to the back side of valves as well.


It's contribution to oil was to make a gray sludge from what escaped with the blowby.


Bogie
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Old 07-12-2019, 10:05 PM
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Back had to do host duties, you can tell how much I like to entertain.


OK, Tetraethyllead went into gasoline for anti knock and they discovered it provided a dry lube for exhaust seats and it collected on everything related to the valves, and got into the oil via blowby. Bromine compounds were added to detergent this stuff away, if you lived through this era you can only imagine what that mess would have looked like without the bromine additive to the fuel. It was never the intention of using TEL as a cam lobe saver and cams didn't do well till the advent of ZDDP as an additive to oil. Cam lobe and lifter loss goes back a long way, hot rod Ford V8's had a lot of trouble this which brought about hardened lifter feet as a solution, that's a story unto itself.


ZDDP short for Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate,sounds like something in a chocolate malt, came out of WW II. This stuff has a nasty formula of Zn((S2P(OR)2)2. The R in this is a messy group hydro-carbon molecules of alkyl group. Although these are a form of alcohol they are not suggested for human consumption. The numbers in this and the previous TEL formula are subscripts, I too lazy to shift back and forth between this Dell,s composer board and the scientific notation board. Sometimes F-it is the best answer.



ZDDP actually performs several functions that oils can benefit from a big one is acid neutralization which protects soft metals like bearings and the insides of aluminum castings. It also is what is called a Tribofilm which in simple terms is a high pressure dry lubricant. It is this protection that is looked for on flat tappet cam lobes and lifters, not bad between gear teeth either.



It is not a bullet proof solution as evidenced in the Muscle Car era's use of very rampy cams with moderate lifts, it is a help but not a cure-all. But back then with all that TEL in the gasoline the engineers just upped the Static Compression Ratio to compensate for late intake closing reverse mixture flow back to the atmosphere driven by the rising piston; this being the basis behind the term Dynamic Compression Ratio or the same meaning term Compensated Compression Ratio.


Today's fuels need to get to higher octane ratings using more expensive root stocks and or the addition of alcohols but at a reasonable cost so the lower 90's is about it. But that is also another wordy story.


From the standpoint of ZDDP probably somewhere in the range of 1800 ppm with a 2000 to 3000 mile oil and filter change. Remember this stuff has other sheet to do, thus is a consumable in ratio mostly to blowby and the acids that makes as it mixes with the oil which in a running engine is a ballistic spray so there's plenty of surface area for these reactions. Current brews use 600 to maybe 800 ppm add to that there are about 13 or 14 different alkly groups that can be used the choice of which probably affects product quality.


One thing you should realize is you world is mostly defined by cost. the great phrase mumbled by one of the astronauts stepping on to the moon; "Imagine, all of this from the low bidder".



I don't know about you but my eyes and fingers are tired.


Bogie

Last edited by BogiesAnnex1; 07-12-2019 at 10:26 PM.
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:01 PM
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Wow sir....I am learning so much about so much stuff from you and ericnova and the rest of the crew, thank you sir I really appreciate you taking the time to respond and explain things the way you do. And if they don't get it the first time you give even more in depth, its awsome learning stuff for a 17 year old kid like me
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Old 07-13-2019, 03:23 AM
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Lead in the oil? Now that's a new one. What about Zinc 🤔🤔
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Old 07-13-2019, 11:58 AM
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VP produces high octane, “lead” free gasoline if it is required by the various low compression engines.

I have had to add various amounts of VP C12 108 octane leaded “racing fuel” gasoline to my fuel tanks since the 1970s. I added it until the detonation stopped, usually about five gallons per 20 gallon tank of 92 octane pump gas. The exception was my 1963 Pontiac Catalina with a 455 CI engine. It required 100% VP C12 108 octane leaded “racing” fuel. It had a flat tappet camshaft and 130/310 lb valve springs, 9770716 heads with 69 cc combustion chambers, flat top Sealed Power pistons with 12:1 compression ratio.

I now have a 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air with 10.3:1 compression ratio and a 3863151 (L79) camshaft. I add about five gallons of VP C12 to fifteen gallons of no-lead premium EXXON just to eliminate the possibility of detonation on the pump gas. I have heard detonation without the VP fuel. The valve springs are GM 3911068 (Z28) set up by the original owner in 1968 set up with 80/270 lb seat/open spring pressure. Those springs have lost about 10 -12 lbs since 1968. I can shift the original Borg Warner T-10 at 5,500 RPM with the 4.11 gears without valve float and the transmission still has the original “wiggle stick” shifter.

My 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air has a 1968 350 CI motor with about 60,000 miles on it, uses about 1/2 quart of Valvoline 10w30 between 3,000 to 4,000 mile changes. I did a 14.80 ET in street trim at The Texas Motorplex about a year ago.

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Old 07-14-2019, 05:49 PM
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Wow! This got off subject in a hurry!
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