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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2019, 01:45 PM
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Bogie I have head studs and since I have a dart shp block they don't have any sealer on them at all and was put in the block dry. All the head bolt holes are blind tapped and don't go into any coolant jackets and that is what is nice about the dart shp block. Now to my ignition box on my petronix box. It hooks up identical like the msd box and I got the main ground of the box going straight to battery and the other smaller ground wire of the box going to the distributor coil inside the cap and then the middle wire on the farthest back of the hei cap I got going to my intake manifold and has always worked.

Now you say you have a ground wire on both of your heads and intake going to a strap that goes to the battery and its a 10 gauge wire. My question is how do you actually have that wired up and sorry for sounding dumb asking and I also have aluminum heads along with intake so where do I get some of that conductive grease at so I can put them on my bolt threads. I assume your using the back of the cylinder heads with one wire going from one head to the other along with a ground wire from the intake bolted up to one of the head bolt grounds then a ground going from there to the battery?

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2019, 02:18 PM
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The only place I've ever seen a need for conductive grease is on the contact area of a knife type switch. Any old common grease can be used just to avoid corrosion, the grounds will get through the parts that touch just fine. I'll bet I could start and run my car if I removed the block ground and bolted it to the aluminum head instead, in which every bolt has plenty of sealant on. If 12 or so head bolts torqued up to spec can't make a good conductor, with or without sealant, I would just love to see it in person. In fact, I have an ohm meter that goes down to .01 ohms. I'll have to see how much resistance is between the head and the block, and the head to the negative battery terminal.
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Old 05-22-2019, 02:46 PM
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Everyone has an option on grounds. Fact, if you have done very much welding, you know how parts can get welded by stray currents. You learn quickly to place the ground clamp close to where you’re welding. The same principles apply to our cars. While you could possibly start your motor with your battery ground connected to head with the current conducting through all the motor bolts, the big question is WHY would you want to???

I don’t particularly like the idea of current flowing through my motor’s parts. I have each head grounded separately, my aluminum heads have threaded bracket holes at the rear of each, my intake has a separate ground, my alternator has a separate ground, my radiator, exc (I think you get the idea). I use conductive grease (aka alumalux or similar), the same stuff electricians use to prevent bad connections with aluminum wiring. It is available at any hardware store in the electrical section.

All this may seem like too much to some, but anyone whose seen the damage caused by stray currents knows better. Do what you want I’m okay with that, but myself, it’s grounded, grounded, grounded and grounded....
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:24 PM
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The only reason I would run my main ground to the aluminum head is just to prove a point that it would work. Aluminum isn't as good a conductor and it has problems oxidizing in open air connections, so I wouldn't use the head for a ground permanently. Just to prove a point that no matter how much thread sealant you put on the bolts will not stop them from making a good electrical connection to the block! Whether it be teflon tape, pipe dope, or thread sealant, it simply will not electrically insulate a tight connection. And as in the previous post, it doesn't make a bit of difference if it's a square wave, a sine wave, or straight DC voltage.



I looked up alumilux and can't find it. What most electricians use on aluminum connections IS NOT conductive. It shields out the elements to stop the aluminum from oxidizing and causing a poor connection. They do make conductive greases, but they are not commonly found in a home wiring, such as where the aluminum mains come into the breaker box from the transformer. That's not conductive grease, none I've seen anyway. Not the grease the electrician used in my house or garage.



I get it, I really do get it. You like ground wires. That's OK in my book, they won't hurt a thing. Again, I was replying to the remark about thread sealant causing a poor electrical connection.
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Old 05-22-2019, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 55 Tony View Post
I looked up alumilux and can't find it.
Sorry used an old name for it;
https://www.sanchem.com/electrical-c...lubricant.html
https://www.gardnerbender.com/en/p/O...idant-Compound
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:02 AM
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Thanks 36. That first one is a bit confusing. It says "conductive" but if you read down it says it isn't, and tests show that grease with metals in them actually impede electrical contact. But it says it breaks through aluminum oxide (chemically?) and sounds like good stuff. Second one sounds good too. I believe the zinc is sacrificial so it oxidizes before air can get to the connection.
Anyway I'm certain either one would help make a good connection lasts longer, I simply haven't found a need for it. The stuff I've seen is just a clear jelly type stuff. That's what the power company used when they moved a pole and had to splice aluminum, and when splicing the aluminum wires going to my garage.
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Old 05-23-2019, 01:36 PM
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Sevetal brands one I usea lot is NoOx

https://www.sanchem.com/electrical-c...lubricant.html

Given youre using studs lack of top endgrpund maynot be the issue, but I 've had this on SBF's which use a blind hole on head fasteners so well maybe even on Dart blocks.

I use studs as well on Frankenmouse given back in my active shop days it ran a lot of experiments that often required head changes. So it seemed wise to take the twist loads off the block threads. The block is just an 880 Vortec 4 bolt so the threaded holes are open to the cooling jackets. The studs are epoxied in so while I haven't measured resistances I'm assuming it isnt good enough for an AL6 boosted ignition box, therefore, I run independent grounds on the heads and intake. Nothing super special just number 10 insulated hookup wire with ring ends and heat shrink tube to protect the crimp joint. I pick up an unused accessory bolt hole on each head and the intake, often that on the intake is the distributor's stud or bolt. I wire one head and the intake both to which ever head is closest or easiest to wire to chassis or battery ground.

Conductive greases are not perfect conductors they usually publish their resistance in ohms per centimeter, but neither is corrosion a good conductor. These greases like engine oil and coolant have sacrificial compounds that prevent corrosion but this isnt a forever thing, they have to be cleaned and relubed maybe once a year or so.

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Old 05-23-2019, 03:13 PM
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These greases like engine oil and coolant have sacrificial compounds that prevent corrosion but this isnt a forever thing, they have to be cleaned and relubed maybe once a year or so.

Bogie

Holy crap! How is it that cars run for 20, 30, or more years without getting these connections cleaned and greased every year? And the billions of aluminum conductor connections for home and business electrical power, out in the rain for god knows how many years? Sure one goes bad now and then, but most of them never need servicing.
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:08 PM
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I'm talking to the requirements of grounding for extreme energy ignitions. They use very high voltages and severe wave forms not lazy DC currects nor that slow 60 cycle ocean wave shaped stuff in our homes ; but rather something more like "wham, bam, thank you mam" stuff that gets in, gets done, gets out. If it has trouble finding guound after it fired the spark plugs it is happy to take what it can get which often is back through the circuitry of the Hall sensor or signal amp of the distributor or the 6AL type high voltage capacitor discharge amp usually hung on the firewall. If it does that the smoke leaks put of the components then things get real quiet. Keeping up on these high energy slammng wave shaped hits the plugs are taking is just insurance against the sudden quiet followed by wallet drainng sucking sounds.

This advice can be found in the MSD instruction sheet, I just run a mop-up operation for those who didnt heed the word of MSD or bought an equally powerful import rendition that doesn't include this warning about top end grounds.


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