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View willys36@aol.com's profile Entries: 207
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04-13-2007 07:33 PM My air compressor system 3
Be sure to anchor the pipes in a lot of places. This down-comer had to have a 1x4 that spans a couple studs to mount a clamp.

I brought two lines down the sides of the hoist for car work. I drilled holes for self-tapping sheet metal screws to hold the clamps. The stick into the tower so be sure they are located in a spot that won't interfere with the mechanism.

Final shot shows use of more 90s and pipe stubs to space the air fitting out form the hoist tower for easy access.


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  [Entry #162]

04-13-2007 07:28 PM My air compressor system 2
These three photos show how the branch lines exit the main line. All come off the top of the line not allowing any condensate to enter them. The main lines slope back to the inlet pipe which comes up from the knockout pot.

Photo 1 is a typical down-comer to a wall mounted hose connector. Standard Tee, 90s and two 1 5/8" long stubs of pipe is all that is needed.

Photo 2 shows a branch line. I mounted all the branch lines flush with the ceiling since hopefully all the water condensation is over by then and I was jockeying around lights and dust collection system.

The final shot is a takeoff from the end of the main line, again from the top using 90s. The line goes through the wall into my paint booth and to a hose quick disconnect. Note the wood block that spaces the fitting out from the wall so I can get at it.


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  [Entry #161]

04-13-2007 07:20 PM My air compressor system 1
Finally getting around to installing the air system in my new shop. The first photo show the compressor, the cooling grid, the knockout vessel and part of the ceiling mounted copper piping. I used 3/4" copper pipe throughout.

Photo 2 shows the 4" pipe knockout I made. It is a venturi centrifugal knockout with tangential air entry and a conical bottom below which is a sump that can be drained with the pet-****.

The air leaves the compressor, goes downward through the cooling grid into the knockout then up into the ceiling distribution lines. I snapped a chalkline with a 2" rise to the end of the main lines in either direction. The center of the main line is low @ 6" from the ceiling. This distance allows for down-comers to come off the top of the line to reduce the amount of water condensate entering them.

Photo 3 shows wooden 2x3x4 blocks I mass produced to mount the system to. The space the pipe 1 1/2" from the wall for better cooling and allows the down-comer to exit behind the main line.


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  [Entry #160]

03-05-2006 06:47 PM Shop landscaping
This may be a stretch for a hot rod topic but I think it will be helpful. Along with building my new shop, I have been landscaping my HUGE back yard. LOTS of sprinker pipe ditches to shovel out after the ditch digger goes back to the rental store. They always seem to leave too much dirt in the ditches and I need to shovel it out. Always tried to do it with a full size round nose shovel but that is a real hassle. Went to Home Depot to look into a 4" ditching shovel but they were $30! That dog don't hunt - I am not paying $30 for a tool I will likely use once in my life.

Finally dawned on me I can make my own ditching shovel. Like all of you guys, I have two or three worn out round nose shoves like in photo 1. Just waiting for the handle to snap so I can put it out of its misery. However, by torching off the two outside edges, I was able to convert it to a great 3-3/4" wide ditching shovel that should last forever since it never has to do heavy digging, just scoops out the loose stuff left behind by the trencher. Fig. three shows it in action. It is actually better than the store bought ones since it has a full length handle whereas the other have short Tee handles that break your back.


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  [Entry #159]

03-04-2006 10:29 PM Traction bars for leaf springs
Nothing looks cooler than big ladder T-bars on a period drag car. However, you normally can't use them w/ leaf springs 'cause ladder bars and leaf springs don't normally mix - they bind. Guys back then had to convert their suspension to quarter elliptics, coil springs or install complicated floaters.

Here is a tech article I wrote some time ago showing two ways to mount the honking ladders on rears w/ stock parallel leaf springs and have all the traction control you want and nice soft bouncy springs.


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  [Entry #158]

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