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View willys36@aol.com's profile Entries: 207
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12-25-2004 11:03 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to43
Here are a bunch of sheet metal trim pieces I made to cover various parts of the rim around the doors. The factory used an ugly, huge rubber welting around the doors and I wanted to use an upholstery one. Their welting fit into a steel channel that was spot riveted in place. I removed the channel and needed something to cover up the tail of th welting I am using. Photo 1 shows the front side covered in cloth and photo 2 shows the rear side and some of the sheet metal. I'll show how these go in later. I left some ends of the panel covering unattached so the cloth would slip under the head liner and door panels if I screwed up on the length of the piece.


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  [Entry #82]

12-25-2004 10:58 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to42
I made a couple of Chevy blazes to fill the holes in the panels. Photos 1 & 2 show how. Just glued the vinyl in place.




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  [Entry #81]

12-25-2004 10:55 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to41
Last step was to glue on the tweed to finish the pleats. I made sure to spray adhesive deep into the grooves so the cloth would stay put. I first laid the vinyl sub panel over the pleated rubber and cut it carefully so it had the exact profile. I then tapered the top edge of the pleated rubber at 45deg. To glue the tweed on I laid it on one pleat, pressed it in place, then used a Popsicle stick to force the cloth into a groove, pressed the cloth flat on another pleat, filled the groove, etc. This method insures the cloth is not stressed across a groove and will lay deeply in them for a good looking pleat. The bottom and sides were then wrapped and glued to the back of the panel.

The panels need a little jazzing up so I decided to add a chrome bead between the materials. Photo 2 shows the foender welting I used to get the bead. This stuff is used for vintage car fenders in place of the normal black stuff that the factory used. Photo 3 shows the welting glued and stapled to the back of the sub panel. I used 3/8" staples for this and every other attachment on the panels except the thin 1/8" wood, 1/8" foam ones mentioned previously.


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  [Entry #80]

12-25-2004 10:41 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to40
Here is how I put the pleated panels on the bottom of the main panels. First I glued on 1/4" thick closed cell foam, measured two inch spaces for the pleat channels and taped the channels with 1/4" masking tape. Photo 2 show the 3M90 adhesive to use. It takes a BUNCH of cans for an interior,I am on my 9th or 10th can @ $13 ea., but there is no way around it. You can mail order it cheaper, I have an order for 6 cans coming @ $8 ea., but needed to get started so bit the bullet and bought a bunch @ Home Depot. I rationalized that I will be saving at least $2000 on my interior doing it myself so glue cost is nothing!

Finally, photo 3 shows how I cut down both sides of the tape @ a 45deg angle with a single edge razor and viola!, pleat grooves!


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  [Entry #79]

12-25-2004 10:31 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to39
I finally got around to starting the upholstery. I am doing all the interior panels and carpeting. Will farm out the seats since I don't have an upholstery sewing machine.

If you go back int he journal a couple of pages you will see the interior panels I made of 1/8" luan door skins. These are the base panels onto which I put pleated tweed directly on the bottom half and smooth vinyl on the top half. Photo 1 is of the luan overlay panel that goes on the upper half of a door pane. It has been covered with first a layer of 1/8" thick closed cell foam, then the vinyl. Photo 2 shows the sandwich. I used 3M90 spray contact adhesive (don't use 3M77 - it will eventually let go) - a medium coat on both pieces, let dry to the touch then position lightly. If you don't press it down you can reposition it properly. Once you press, it's permanent! Photo 3 show the cloth glued and stapled to the back. The panel clips are hidden by the overlay.

I'll discuss the speaker hole and Chevy blaze decorative hole later. You can make out the door handle and arm rest holes that I haven't cut yet. I didn't glue down the top or sides of the vinyl becaus they need to wrap around the main panel when this sub panel is glued and stapled to it. I used 1/4" long staples with my Arrow electric staple gun for this thin sandwich.


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  [Entry #78]

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