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Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior> So Por-15 can go over rust.
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-15-2017 06:27 PM
enjenjo
Quote:
You can even use it on new clean metal
Not without etching the metal. If applied to a clean mill finish, it will come off in sheets like plastidip. Even sanding is not enough bite. Even a second coat of POR 15 over cured POR 15 will not adhere without sanding thoroughly.
05-15-2017 04:52 PM
st3gamefarm I have used it on many different vehicles with great results. I used it on the replacement hood on Ol' Blue. Ya gotta get the loose stuff off. Por15 will stick to loose scale, but loose scale will come off, and take the coating with it. What it does (near as I can tell) is to seal the rust so that it cannot progress.
It's still there, but cannot go any further. Rust/corrosion, is kinda like fire, it requires certian things to happen. Remove any one of those, and it can't happen. Por 15 removes one or more of the things that cause rust, so it can't progress. You can even use it on new clean metal.
05-15-2017 12:04 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
holy 12 year old thread recovery batman!
And it looks like by an employee of Por-15!

Brian
05-15-2017 11:07 AM
ogre holy 12 year old thread recovery batman!
05-13-2017 04:44 PM
Big Truck Driver
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmf1313 View Post
POR 15 is neither lacquer nor urethane based, it's based on CA (Cyanoacrylate) aka super glue, which is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture in its curing process. It forms a chemical bond with moisture, neutralizing and immobilizing rust, something that neither lacquer or urethane can do.
If I have a area thats been sandblasted, osphoed, washed and clean but still have a couple dots of rust that i cant get out. Will por 15 work here? 98% cleaned etched metal.
05-13-2017 04:19 PM
gmf1313
Por 15

POR 15 is neither lacquer nor urethane based, it's based on CA (Cyanoacrylate) aka super glue, which is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture in its curing process. It forms a chemical bond with moisture, neutralizing and immobilizing rust, something that neither lacquer or urethane can do.
01-08-2005 03:28 PM
MARTINSR Click here for all you need to know
01-08-2005 02:23 PM
Z51JEFF This stuff pretty much sticks to everything you dont want it to.
01-08-2005 10:49 AM
enjenjo
Quote:
Originally posted by Fordy8man
enjenjo, were can i get a catalog for the Rust bullet. i rather order something out of a catalog than off the internet. does this stuff not require the stuff that comes in the spray bottles with por-15. can you just put it on the area and and be all set with it.
thanks for you advise Fordy8man
That stuff in the bottle is just metal etch. You should be able to get a catalog on the web site I listed above. You don't need metal etch for Rust Bullet.
01-08-2005 09:52 AM
Fordy8man enjenjo, were can i get a catalog for the Rust bullet. i rather order something out of a catalog than off the internet. does this stuff not require the stuff that comes in the spray bottles with por-15. can you just put it on the area and and be all set with it.
thanks for you advise Fordy8man
01-08-2005 09:42 AM
[email protected] It works great, next best thing to powder coating BUT I hate to see it used as the first resort. Sounds like you have done good prep work so give it a try.

On second thought, here is a brand new thread by our resident metal magician Randy Ferguson on this very topic. His method does away with the need for a gimmick by totally removing the rust which is a good thing!
01-08-2005 09:33 AM
Fordy8man Just to let you guys know a little more, Im not just going to throw it on some real badly rusted panels. I have sanded, grinded, and sandblasted them as best as i could. i cant get exactly all of the rust so i need another solution. im not trying to find a solution that involves no work but where im at now its the last resort. when i first posted i was asking because the catalog that i was reading made it out that you could just through this stuff on a badly rusted area and your problems would be over. i wanted to make sure it wasent some kind a gimic thing that i was going to spend my money on.
but in all thanks for all the advise guys.
Fordy8man
01-08-2005 05:41 AM
red65mustang
Fordy,

For rust to continue to "grow" it has to have H2O and O2 and a small electric charge (even from static electricity). (Just like a fire, fuel/o2/spark).

Eliminate any one, rust can't grow.

POR15 and bedliner and ZR paint and epoxy works as a very very good h2o barrier. KEY thing is it has to grab hard and tight to the metal so do as much prep and cleaning as you can.

I agree with Willys36, if you can do any sanding and blasting do it so the POR etc. can grab better/last longer.

Rust converters don't work because the converted rust crystals are not bonded and sealed to the good steel. What you saw is "new" rust starting. Converters (acid) only react with existing rust and then go neutral in a day or so reacting with moisture in the air=new rust.

The converter I use, when I have to, is the Duplicolor because it is a heavy acrylic mix and helps seal the crystals and surface. Again, I only use it as a last resort.
01-08-2005 01:55 AM
Kultured
Quote:
Originally posted by chopper1
Just a word of caution when using Por15. Wear latex gloves! and old clothes. Whatever you get the paint on it's there for the duration. If you get it on your skin and it dries, it will have to wear off. Nothing, including solvent, paint thinner, gasoline, will take it off. The voice of experience.
mike


I use it a lot in the marine industry.. VEGTABLE OIL!!!! soak your body part for about 30 min.. wipes off. your pores absorb the oil and swells it up.. works for me anyways...

and if you catch it wet.. xylol or the por 15 solvent works
01-08-2005 01:20 AM
[email protected] You are probably right. The spray stuff was likely just phosphoric acid which converts rust temporarily and must be coated with paint to secure the rust conversion whereas POR15 is a water cured urethane that cures to a permanent monolith. It does like sticking to anything (including skin!) and does tie up rust pretty well. My main concern is that Fordy sounds like he wants a solution with no work involved and that is a bad work habit to develop. Getting totally rid of rust is the ONLY sure way to be rid of it. These 'miracle chemicals' are pretty nice insurance against rust that you miss but I prefer to remove every bit I can before using them. But them I took 35 years to get my Willys on the road so take that into consideration too!
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