Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board - Reply to Topic
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans Advertise
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools> doing so much structural I have to come up with better drill methods for hss
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Thread: doing so much structural I have to come up with better drill methods for hss Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
02-15-2018 07:32 AM
tech69 I was struggling the other day cutting just 8 holes into a panel. I think the step bit and or rotabroach will do the trick. Just gonna keep it oiled. They are annoying as heck to cut.
02-15-2018 12:54 AM
Hipster_G I have used the bits specifically for Boron. I didn't see much difference between that and cobalt. Still took a couple bits to get a tail panel off.
02-14-2018 11:42 PM
tech69 also got these. Made from M2 high strength steel. It's not so much the material with these, it's the way they work and the price. At slow RPM and oil these will hopefully last. for Boron they suggest an $80 bit that you use just for Boron, which is Tungsten Carbide. Not cheap. I'll try my $10 Rotabroach on slow.

Attachment 405570
02-14-2018 11:38 PM
tech69 ordered these off of ebay. M42 Cobalt and guaranteed against breakage for life. Only $29!!! I will use cutting oil

Attachment 405562
02-09-2018 08:49 AM
tech69
Quote:
Originally Posted by idrivejunk View Post
Forgot to say anything about stepped bits... I have been quite impressed with the smallest bit in HFs nitrided 2 or 3 bit assortment. I use one often and have only bought a replacement once in all my years, because the tip broke off one finally. Bit still cuts good though. Only thing about those is its easy to cook a step once you're past 1/2" dia or so. I start with Snap Off double ender 1/8" bits from a ten pack. If the metal gives those a tough time... I would go for the plasma cutter because sometimes bits are just too slow, expensive, and laborious to use when you can cut instead. The rotabroach cutters are probably the good choice. I think I tried the plasma one day when some hard part dulled every bit in the shop. I do remember telling myself to start with that when possible. Even if you just blow a tiny hole through, then you can go at it with a step bit. Might be something you could try. Worth a shot just due to cost. Until you have to go buy more plasma.
think I'm gonna get a cobalt 3 piece step bit and another round of rotabroach 3pack in 3/8". The shop provides pilot bits and spot cutters but I have to provide my own drill bits. I think that will solve many of the issues. Thanks guys! Now I gotta consider a welding apron w/ sleeves.... It never ends.
02-09-2018 08:46 AM
tech69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hipster_G View Post
Recently used the 1/2 inch x 18 inch sanding belts to do a couple jobs at a friends shop helping out. Shop supplied the belts for the guys though. Core support, rear body/ trunk floor, and quarter panel jobs. Worked killer for that. Super fast, had the stuff apart in no time, and so much less effort then drilling. Used Norton ceramic belts. The 60 and 80g actually held up better then the 40g ones. Faster then the 3m 3 inch weld grinding cut off wheels and less mess and sparks. You'd need a couple 3-4 belts to get a rear body/trunk floor out. I have a bad arm where I lost muscle mass due to M/C wreck so I try to do as little drilling as possible, sometimes it's the only way and I always end up back at the rotabroach kit.
I got a mini belt sander. they are amazing. have no trouble tearing up squares into the metal but I'm talking prepping rails for plug welds or pieces you gotta save. Fell in love with the belt sander soon as I touched one.
02-09-2018 06:40 AM
idrivejunk
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
I had good luck with a step bit today and it's 4-5 years old. I'm assuming with a better step bit it would help.
Forgot to say anything about stepped bits... I have been quite impressed with the smallest bit in HFs nitrided 2 or 3 bit assortment. I use one often and have only bought a replacement once in all my years, because the tip broke off one finally. Bit still cuts good though. Only thing about those is its easy to cook a step once you're past 1/2" dia or so. I start with Snap Off double ender 1/8" bits from a ten pack. If the metal gives those a tough time... I would go for the plasma cutter because sometimes bits are just too slow, expensive, and laborious to use when you can cut instead. The rotabroach cutters are probably the good choice. I think I tried the plasma one day when some hard part dulled every bit in the shop. I do remember telling myself to start with that when possible. Even if you just blow a tiny hole through, then you can go at it with a step bit. Might be something you could try. Worth a shot just due to cost. Until you have to go buy more plasma.
02-09-2018 02:42 AM
Hipster_G Recently used the 1/2 inch x 18 inch sanding belts to do a couple jobs at a friends shop helping out. Shop supplied the belts for the guys though. Core support, rear body/ trunk floor, and quarter panel jobs. Worked killer for that. Super fast, had the stuff apart in no time, and so much less effort then drilling. Used Norton ceramic belts. The 60 and 80g actually held up better then the 40g ones. Faster then the 3m 3 inch weld grinding cut off wheels and less mess and sparks. You'd need a couple 3-4 belts to get a rear body/trunk floor out. I have a bad arm where I lost muscle mass due to M/C wreck so I try to do as little drilling as possible, sometimes it's the only way and I always end up back at the rotabroach kit.
02-08-2018 11:59 PM
tech69 I had good luck with a step bit today and it's 4-5 years old. I'm assuming with a better step bit it would help.
02-08-2018 10:54 PM
johnsongrass1 When I replaced the front clip on my Subaru I got through about 30 of the 300 spot welds and went to Carbide Burr for a while, gave up on that and went to a step bit. Days and weeks later, sore hands and all I finished. I hope to never do another ever in my entire life.
02-08-2018 10:38 PM
tech69 we got worth bits but not sure if they charge them out per job and shops generally keep them in the office so I get intimidated asking. I already asked for 2 $75 double ended cutters and some 1/8 bits, AKA don't go back in there for a while. I'm gonna check to see if the drill doctor works for cobalt. If so that solves everything. Anywho, you ought to try the blair rotabroach. They are so much more beefier than the double ended ones. I never had luck with those things but the rotabroach ones are amazing. $30 for a pack of 3. Can't go wrong.
I gotta think of something fast cause it took me forever to drill 10 holes and I know I can't go into the office for a bit for at least two weeks but they're giving me nothing but weld jobs. Thanks guys!
02-08-2018 08:43 PM
idrivejunk I have a lifetime supply of used Wurth Zebra Cobalt (black and hard) and high speed (bright) spot weld bits with pilot tip in 6, 8, and 10 from not tossing them after being billed to jobs a decade ago. I have and prefer to use Blair spot weld cutters generally speaking, the ones that are like little double ended holesaws with pin. For those steels that laugh, destroy and taunt... I got cozy with a plasma cutter and cut a tight circle around the weld. Chances are if you mess that up a little on the plain steel its connected to, you can easily make the mistake part of new MIG welds or just weld up the hole. Cutting metal with fire is way cooler than blowing out tendons cooking a pricey bit anyhow. Does that technique apply today? Clueless but that was always a frustrating situation and I'm sure it has become more common in recent years.
02-08-2018 03:03 PM
OneMoreTime spend the money at McMaster Carr for good bits and just get the sizes you most commonly use..Learning to sharpen bits is a big help as well..

Sam
02-08-2018 02:17 PM
tech69
doing so much structural I have to come up with better drill methods for hss

my cobalt bits were decent when I got here but these rails are killing them. Another trunk floor and rear body with dull bits. I came up with this. 1/8' to 3/16" then to cheap HF step bit(for plug weld holes). The step bit has lasted forever, surprisingly. So much I'm thinking of getting a better one. Seems to work great with that technique. With the hss you can't really make huge jumps when stepping up bit size. I also had success with blair rotabroach cutting around welds, which doesn't really touch them at all. That helps too. What's your technique?

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.