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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-14-2019 05:36 AM
professor229 I inherited a 90's Chevy Lumina..... from Florida so it was not a rust bucket, but knew about the myriad of problems with the 3.1 engine gaskets so I researched it and talked to several mechanics I trust.... All of them said the exact same thing.... the gaskets will fail.... it's a matter of time... but the cost to change the gaskets was more than the car was worth, so "drive it until it fails." Ahhhh I don't do that... so I sold it. In the old days, I might have attempted to change the gaskets myself as the new/recommended gaskets were relatively cheap.... as always, it was the labor cost that kills the deal.... PS.... the car had other problems as well.... a radio that never worked right, an electrical short draw down (again, probably the GM radio), the AC failed, and the the injectors needed to be replaced at 50,000 miles....
07-08-2019 02:14 AM
BogiesAnnex1
Quote:
Originally Posted by LATECH View Post
It was a brief synopsis, showing that the subject was more in depth than just about color of said coolant.That was all I wanted to show.

Plenty of info on coolants available on the net , and in shop repair software,like alldata , etc.

Just tryin to speak a little "bubba" here. Best to let questions be asked, than to give a long lecture no one will read.
Thanks for the speaking "bubba".

Actually there's a pretty good almost technical article in Wikipedia on engine coolants. It has enough information to make any reader dangerous to themselves and anyone nearby but does develop the differences in silicates (green); OATs (usually but not always orange); HOATs (usually some weird Asian color but not always).

Bogie
07-07-2019 09:28 PM
LATECH
Quote:
Originally Posted by BogiesAnnex1 View Post
Last time I needed AAA, they sent a guy that didn't understand how to jumper a battery, let alone have any knowledge of coolant deeper than that of an ad agency salesman. Kind of like calling AARP for retirement help.

Bogie
It was a brief synopsis, showing that the subject was more in depth than just about color of said coolant.That was all I wanted to show.

Plenty of info on coolants available on the net , and in shop repair software,like alldata , etc.

Just tryin to speak a little "bubba" here. Best to let questions be asked, than to give a long lecture no one will read.
07-07-2019 07:38 PM
BogiesAnnex1
Quote:
Originally Posted by LATECH View Post
Yada yada yada

https://www.aaa.com/autorepair/artic...r-your-vehicle

Read this.

Dont go just by color
Last time I needed AAA, they sent a guy that didn't understand how to jumper a battery, let alone have any knowledge of coolant deeper than that of an ad agency salesman. Kind of like calling AARP for retirement help.

Bogie
07-07-2019 07:32 PM
BogiesAnnex1
Quote:
Originally Posted by briansansone View Post
I think I have a pretty good summery here.

It seems like the coolants that last a long time, in a closed system, are a good idea for new nice vehicles. I guess to keep it going you would have to drain replace the coolant ...and evacuate the air? Perfectly? and pray air leaks stay away at the 5 year mark, 10 year mark 15 year ,etc...
Air must have got into the system in my99 s10. Maybe even when I did something that required I open it. I had no idea about air and dexcool.

It seems like oncce your truck ages and you start tinkering with it, having a coolant that gets along with the air that inevitably will get in, is a good idea. Especially if you are constantly doing thing that require opening the system.
It was easy for air to get in as GM didn't do their "do diligence" probably just taking Texaco's technical review that it was compatble with the materials it contacted.

Turned out it chemically attacked certain silicone gasket materials resulting in coolant leakage out and air in. That then set off a reaction with the Organic Acid Technology (OAT) coolant making a coagulant that plugged passages in the cooling system.

Being a simple thinker when I see the word 'Acid' and think cooling system, I think not in mine.

Bogie
07-07-2019 07:11 PM
LATECH
Quote:
Originally Posted by briansansone View Post
I think I have a pretty good summery here.

It seems like the coolants that last a long time, in a closed system, are a good idea for new nice vehicles. I guess to keep it going you would have to drain replace the coolant ...and evacuate the air? Perfectly? and pray air leaks stay away at the 5 year mark, 10 year mark 15 year ,etc...
Air must have got into the system in my99 s10. Maybe even when I did something that required I open it. I had no idea about air and dexcool.

It seems like once your truck ages and you start tinkering with it, having a coolant that gets along with the air that inevitably will get in, is a good idea. Especially if you are constantly doing thing that require opening the system.
A 99 S 10 has a recovery tank.So coolant flows to and from the tank when heating up/cooling down. The tank is open to the air. Basically it subjects the whole system to air influx over time. A surge tank is enclosed and under pressure , which eliminates this problem.
07-07-2019 06:47 PM
briansansone
Quote:
Originally Posted by predator carb guru View Post
I've both seen and heard of lots of issues with Dexcool antifreeze. I won't use it in my stuff at all, replaced all of it with either a quality green version or Prestone, which is my fav. Most of what I've seen is substantial corrosion in cooling systems because of it. Not sure why it happens, but never had an issue with green stuff or Prestone as long as it's maintained. (tested twice a year and changed every two). Antifreeze isn't any different than anything else in an engine, it's a maintenance item and needs to be monitored just like oil level and other things. Problem is too many people just let it go until something happens, and that's the biggest issue is lack of maintenance. But still seems to be something odd with Dexcool stuff.....
I had an aluminum line leaking where a hose met. I assumed it was just the hose leaking , because it was old and brittle. I went to pull the hose from the aluminum line....and the end of the line broke off. It was corroded on the inside like I had never seen . It was maybe a millimeter thick, and it looked like it had melted. No aluminum oxide or anything. Just a pipe eroded to almost nothing. I checked some of the other aluminum lines nd fittings, they all seemed fine. I suspect dexcool.....and maybe an air bubble at that point
07-07-2019 06:39 PM
briansansone
Quote:
Originally Posted by LATECH View Post
Dexcool degrades and turns sludgy when exposed to air.

That being said ,any system with an overflow tank, exposes the coolant to air.

A system with an expansion tank is a true closed system.

And , as with anything, dexcool has a life span of about 5 years in an ideal closed system. It is an OAT based coolant

The question is....Do you want to run a glycol based coolant

Do you want to run an OAT based coolant


Do you want to run an HOAT based coolant.

Make a choice
I think I have a pretty good summery here.

It seems like the coolants that last a long time, in a closed system, are a good idea for new nice vehicles. I guess to keep it going you would have to drain replace the coolant ...and evacuate the air? Perfectly? and pray air leaks stay away at the 5 year mark, 10 year mark 15 year ,etc...
Air must have got into the system in my99 s10. Maybe even when I did something that required I open it. I had no idea about air and dexcool.

It seems like once your truck ages and you start tinkering with it, having a coolant that gets along with the air that inevitably will get in, is a good idea. Especially if you are constantly doing thing that require opening the system.
07-07-2019 06:22 PM
briansansone Wow. I thought there would be supporters on both sides. Seems like everyone is in agreement.
07-07-2019 06:16 PM
briansansone
Quote:
Originally Posted by '48 Austin View Post
Prestone or Peak green. Buy the 50/50 or concentrate and make it 50/50. I the mid to late '90's the orange had problems with Chevy V6 and V8 intake manifold gaskets. It would attack the silicone part of the gasket and start leaking. I changed a lot of them back then. The newer gaskets don't have the problem. I still use the green antifreeze in all my stuff.
That is excactly what happened to my 99 s10 v6. It almost didnt survive.
Thats when I drained my other chevys and put in green coolant.
07-07-2019 01:09 PM
LATECH Yada yada yada

https://www.aaa.com/autorepair/artic...r-your-vehicle

Read this.

Dont go just by color
07-07-2019 12:19 PM
BogiesAnnex1 I switch Dexcool to "simple" green immediatly for everybody except myself. For my stuff I use Evans waterless. But it is expensive both for the liquids and the labor time of conversion so most people aren't up to the front loaded cost, they just fritter away a few bucks frequently instead of just getting it overwith and moving on.

Bogie
07-07-2019 12:04 PM
LATECH Dexcool degrades and turns sludgy when exposed to air.

That being said ,any system with an overflow tank, exposes the coolant to air.

A system with an expansion tank is a true closed system.

And , as with anything, dexcool has a life span of about 5 years in an ideal closed system. It is an OAT based coolant

The question is....Do you want to run a glycol based coolant

Do you want to run an OAT based coolant


Do you want to run an HOAT based coolant.

Make a choice
07-07-2019 11:49 AM
Crosley My 2006 Silverado I bought new... within 1 year the Dexcool was removed. Flushed the system with distilled water. Added a mixture of Prestone antifreeze product. I change the coolant each 2 or 3 years.

102k miles on the truck.. It seems happy still
07-07-2019 10:54 AM
predator carb guru I've both seen and heard of lots of issues with Dexcool antifreeze. I won't use it in my stuff at all, replaced all of it with either a quality green version or Prestone, which is my fav. Most of what I've seen is substantial corrosion in cooling systems because of it. Not sure why it happens, but never had an issue with green stuff or Prestone as long as it's maintained. (tested twice a year and changed every two). Antifreeze isn't any different than anything else in an engine, it's a maintenance item and needs to be monitored just like oil level and other things. Problem is too many people just let it go until something happens, and that's the biggest issue is lack of maintenance. But still seems to be something odd with Dexcool stuff.....
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