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Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools> Anyone have a Astro DS1000 Door skinning tool to lend?
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-09-2019 01:00 AM
Hipster_G
Quote:
Originally Posted by Excellenceautosoluti View Post
This is one of the best tricks for skinning a door. I've always found to leave the door "skin side up" so that you are hammering up and not down, until you get it folded good all the way around. Then flip it over, and do your final crimp with the hammer. 3M 8115 has made life easier in the last 25 years as you dont have to crimp it super tight. My old man used a nice heavy piece of wood. 2x4 about 6" is good also. This is becoming a lost art, along with many other methods in todays colission repair industry. Find a good ole bodyman and learn what you can. The work is not rocket science, but takes alot of practice to get really good at it. I often feel for the cars I learned on in the late 80's and early 90's. But I don't feel THAT bad, because most of them have probably served their duty, and are long gone! LOL!
I keep a couple pieces of 2x4 in my box. They come in handy or can be shaped to fit in where a dolly won't.
11-09-2019 12:08 AM
tech69 If you're doing a skin on a modern car you can run a blade and make the seam sealer flush with the folded over flange. This keeps a nice line of seam sealer to tell you exactly where the skin needs to go. If no sealer you can scribe a line. Due to that tip, you can throw on your door and it will often be perfect fitting. If not, I just use plastic wedges to push the skin where I want and let the panel adhesive to dry on car. This is easily done if you leave the very top flange where the belt moulding goes, open. Then I just hammer it a little and due to limited space, I just use duck bill pliers for final cinch. Also Very important to have really tight clamps in that belt moulding area as you start hammering on your skin, as any clamps on the skin won't be tight enough and the skin will slide around.
11-08-2019 12:11 PM
Excellenceautosoluti [QUOTE=Hipster_G

Buzzing the edge of the panel with 80g or a roloc where it folds and having it set up on a stand where the door isn't bouncing as you work it helps.[/QUOTE]

This is one of the best tricks for skinning a door. I've always found to leave the door "skin side up" so that you are hammering up and not down, until you get it folded good all the way around. Then flip it over, and do your final crimp with the hammer. 3M 8115 has made life easier in the last 25 years as you dont have to crimp it super tight. My old man used a nice heavy piece of wood. 2x4 about 6" is good also. This is becoming a lost art, along with many other methods in todays colission repair industry. Find a good ole bodyman and learn what you can. The work is not rocket science, but takes alot of practice to get really good at it. I often feel for the cars I learned on in the late 80's and early 90's. But I don't feel THAT bad, because most of them have probably served their duty, and are long gone! LOL!
11-08-2019 10:04 AM
Hipster_G Door skins have never been my strong suit. I usually need to touch the door up in a few places. My buddy that can roll through them perfect in no time every time says I try and crimp them too tight. Idk, but we have both watched guys buy these special tools and destroy new skins and the new tools go into the tool box never to be used again. I'm another that uses a "fine tuned" skinning hammer and plastic or rubber dollies.

Buzzing the edge of the panel with 80g or a roloc where it folds and having it set up on a stand where the door isn't bouncing as you work it helps.
11-07-2019 11:52 PM
tech69 you gotta know what angle to have it at, what areas it will work well on and what areas it will dent. I prefer a red rubber dolly that a retired body man sells on eBay and a HF door skin hammer that I groomed to softened the edges. I like the work out and feel no need for an air tool for that. If I did door skins everyday and felt it would make a huge difference than that's another thing. I do a door skin once or twice a month.
10-04-2019 06:27 AM
idrivejunk
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schroeder View Post
Thank you. Don't be afraid to cut and weld a little tip on the corners then at the end?
If needed. Or to trim a little here or there. Whatever it takes.
10-04-2019 04:32 AM
Schroeder Thank you. Don't be afraid to cut and weld a little tip on the corners then at the end?
10-03-2019 09:45 PM
idrivejunk You'll find that if any slop is present, it won't be much. The answer is to hang the door before making the final pass of folding the edge, and before tacking the skin to the shell, to check fit. Then taking it back off to finish. Tailoring the fit of corners to your exact car is to be expected after skin replacement. Some need little, some need lots.
10-03-2019 09:07 PM
Schroeder I won't get too far in to the weeds since this is a tool topic, but I have 1 question I can't find addressed on the internet. When a door is reskinned it seems there is potential for the the skin to be put on slightly crooked making it very tough to get good body line alignment and proper gaps. How do you fit the door skin to the door frame and then that assembly to the car without having the whole skinning job complete? It's hard to fit to the car and get a real feel for the finish fit if the flange isn't completely folded over the door frame flange, so it seems any sort of test fitting is useless until the skin is fully installed. However, at this point it's also impossible to move the skin and adjust it to where you want it since the flange is folded over and in place. At that point the adjustment has to come from the hinges. Is this just the nature of the job? Am I missing something obvious or just over thinking it and any adjustment I should need will in fact come from the hinges?
10-02-2019 07:48 AM
Excellenceautosoluti Skinning a door is a lost art. This procedure can be done nicely with little practice. You can get your first one right. You will need to be taught by someone who can do it perfectly, and if you follow his/her example you can do a nice job on your first one.
That being said... To skin a door with no damage takes multiple "Tricks" and is one of the hardest things to do in the collision repair industry.
It can be done on the first shot, but you will need to take your time and really pay attention to whoever teaches you. ONLY listen to and learn from someone who you have seen do this with your own eyes. This procedure can take years to master, as even in the body shop you dont do it everyday...
I can't tell you how many guys I have seen with a coat of filler all the way around the door when it goes to paint because they just didn't follow all the steps right. Not saying that there is anything wrong with this, as it is pretty much Industry Standard. Just takes more time, and usually you are working commission in a body shop. So the less you have your hands on it, the more you can do something else...
It's been 10 years since I was on line in a production shop. I learned from my Dad, who people said was pretty good. I also learned from some of the best custom body guys in the nation. But we all had to do collision work to make good money, so we could all skin doors like nobodys business!
I did one a few years back and still had "The Touch" LOL!
Look around, find a good body man and see how he does it.
I know you can do it, because I did good on my first one. But you really need to learn from someone with a good technique... Because you can end up with a real mess in a hurry.
10-02-2019 07:40 AM
Schroeder
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasracer View Post
That's a good example of a crimping tool. I use a 4" wide sheetmetal tool - mostly used for building duct work. If hammer and dolly bother you, maybe you should just take the doors to a body shop and have them do it - probably cheaper and easier in the long run.
Do you care to share a picture or link?
10-02-2019 07:22 AM
chasracer That's a good example of a crimping tool. I use a 4" wide sheetmetal tool - mostly used for building duct work. If hammer and dolly bother you, maybe you should just take the doors to a body shop and have them do it - probably cheaper and easier in the long run.
10-01-2019 09:41 PM
idrivejunk I have a good bit of experience with that pneumatic tool but don't have one. It has a steep learning curve and falls short of expectations, particularly on old cars. I suggest traditional technique because the potential for damage is less, and you'll have to use a hammer whether you have a perfect run with the skinner or not.
10-01-2019 09:16 PM
Schroeder
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasracer View Post
unless you're doing a bunch of door skins, I don't see the value in it. Crimp tool and a little hammer/dolly work should do just fine.
Like this crimping tool?

http://www.maxclawtools.com/product-...OL-PH-231.html

Doesn't this tool and/or only using hammer and dolly greatly increase the chances of denting the exterior side of the door skin? I just can't believe not a single dent, ding, crease, or buckle won't occur from hammering and dollying the entire door perimeter.
10-01-2019 08:58 PM
chasracer unless you're doing a bunch of door skins, I don't see the value in it. Crimp tool and a little hammer/dolly work should do just fine.
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