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Old 10-04-2013, 03:48 PM
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quarter panel replacement

hi guys,,,i was wondering which method is better and has good results when replacing quarter panels. example i replaced both rear quarter panels on a 71 pontiac grand prix,, on the passenger side i but welded the quarter panel in place it seems like it was more prone to heat warpage and it had little more waves to it when i was done with it , so on the drivers side i lap welded the new quarter on , it felt like it was stronger and less warpage and things aligned better and more straighter....now the question which method has worked for you guys ?... or which one would be considered proper i guess ???? thanks

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Old 10-04-2013, 08:26 PM
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The preferred method when changing the whole quarter is to drill and remove the spot welds and put the new quarter back in the factory position and spot weld it in place after getting everything fitted. If you are referring to patch panels, it depends on what you are working on. They can be butt welded if you want a completely invisible repair front and back, or flanged and lap welded if you want to do a little body work on the inside to hide the repair. The cons to a butt weld is it is more difficult to get an even gap when cutting the two panels for fitting. The cons to flanging and lap welding (while easier than butt welding) is if it is not done properly you have created a seam for water, dirt, and whatever else to get in and cause a rust problem. Each method has pros and cons when welding in partial panels. Hope this helps explain things a little better.

Kelly
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:41 PM
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thanks ,,,yea had to replace patch panels man I don't like those.
I tried both methods of welds,,,and yes getting the gap correct or close is hard enouph.....I was just wondering, on the flange and lap weld I used seam sealer on the inside of the trunk , to seam out the weld, Im hoping that would keep stuff out of the weld..
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:57 AM
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It's really what your expectations are. If you aren't after a 100 point show car where the inside looks like the outside the lap weld is perfectly fine.
If you seal it completely you are good, where you can't get in there a sprayable primer and wax is the ticket. But I hope you don't plan on your quarters being full of water?

The butt weld can be welded without so much warpage, it takes practice, it takes studying the process. But it can be done, this takes a dedication, not everyone has the time or the passion.

Doing a flange weld properly isn't the "best" way to do it as butt welding would be the best way, but it is the "Bestest" way as I like to say.

This isn't a technical issue like welding a frame, or hooking up a steering linkage it's pretty superficial in the grand scheme of things. If you are happy, then damn it your smiling face behind the steering wheel is most important.

Brian
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:39 PM
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thanks martin,,,i did both welds,but heres the kicker, its a 71 Pontiac grand prix, I couldn't find the quarter panels for it so I found some on ebay, well when I got the quarters in , I started measuring and I found it had a different body line around the rear wheel wells, it turned out midyear of 71 they changed the bodyline of the grand prix ,so I had to improvise had to cut it to make it fit and weld it in place forced the bodyline ,,, yea it was tricky to make it fit, thanks for the tip
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 81camaro1 View Post
hi guys,,,i was wondering which method is better and has good results when replacing quarter panels. example i replaced both rear quarter panels on a 71 pontiac grand prix,, on the passenger side i but welded the quarter panel in place it seems like it was more prone to heat warpage and it had little more waves to it when i was done with it , so on the drivers side i lap welded the new quarter on , it felt like it was stronger and less warpage and things aligned better and more straighter....now the question which method has worked for you guys ?... or which one would be considered proper i guess ???? thanks
you really need to use both and know when to use each.
When doing a long seam I prefer a lap joint done with a flanger but as Kelly pointed out if the lap is upside down it'll hold moisture so be sure to flange the mating surface and not the patch panel so the open end is pointing down.

when I can get behind the seam and use my hammer and dolly I'll use a butt weld seam or if its a small patch that wont warp too much.

Whenever possible I'll use a full 1/4 (usually used) cut and welded at all factory seams
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
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you really need to use both and know when to use each.
When doing a long seam I prefer a lap joint done with a flanger but as Kelly pointed out if the lap is upside down it'll hold moisture so be sure to flange the mating surface and not the patch panel so the open end is pointing down.

when I can get behind the seam and use my hammer and dolly I'll use a butt weld seam or if its a small patch that wont warp too much.

Whenever possible I'll use a full 1/4 (usually used) cut and welded at all factory seams
Going to the edge and using the factory seams anyway you can is always the best way to go. I learned in doing collision work this is also a great tip doing custom work. Where years ago I would have done ANYTHING to avoid those seams, now it's so simple to just remove panels to gain access, or to use the factory seam in the custom work like on the firewall of the truck where I sectioned it using the factory seam on the top of the cowl, simply drilling out all the holes then trimming off some of the cowl, dropping it down and welding it back to the firewall, Wham bam done!





The first one of these I sectioned 35 years ago I cut thru the middle of the firewall just as Valley custom did the R&C Dream truck back in the fifties and it was a THOUSAND times more work! HOLY CRAP what a difference going to that seam.

Brian
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:39 PM
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thanks guys I agree, u had to cut the quarter in half to make it work and yea it was a whole lot of work, I replaced a rear valance and rear trunk area on a Camaro and I used the factory seams , and it was way easier .thanks for the input guys
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