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Old 05-04-2019, 10:48 AM
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steering

can an early (ie 1960-70 ish) power steering pump be used with a 90's model rack and pinion?

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Old 05-04-2019, 06:14 PM
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pressure match.

You have to match pressure requirements. there are pressure reducing kit when using a gm pump with Mustang II racks.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:36 PM
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i was thinking early pump to 98 cavalier rack. need to use a rear steer rack on a shoebox ford. early pump will allow me to stay with v belt setup. so need to reduce pressure for a rack?
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:42 PM
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I installed a new flow/ pressure valve with much less pressure & fluid flow from TURNONE High Performance Systems.

I tried shimming the pressure valve on my LS1 that's installed in my '56 Chevy, four times. Did not get the job done, she still steering way to easy and to fast.

I spoke with Tech Support at TURNONE. Installed the recommend pressure valve an it steers great now !! Less than $50 and no hassles.

I didn't need to remove the power steering pump, only the high pressure line and the old pressure valve. A bit messy but took less than an hour and well worth the effort.

Good Luck
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Depback29 View Post
can an early (ie 1960-70 ish) power steering pump be used with a 90's model rack and pinion?
As long as fluid pressure equals what the rack was designed to use, the rack does not care who made the pressure. What bothers me when someone begins talking about using a certain rack in a custom application is whether or not they have laid out the geometry so that there is no bump steer in the system. For instance, a straight line drawn through the upper and lower ball joint swivel points at the frame of the car should also intersect the inner ball joints on the rack.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:49 PM
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this one gets tricky.... 50 ford has king pins, and arms point back. have to use a rear steer rack, and seems most conversions are using cavalier or sunbird racks because of that. seems that manual racks are a bit hard to come by, and if i am going to fabricate in a power rack, might as well have power steering as well. i know..... just use a cavalier pump.... they are set up for serpentine belts, but i want to keep the v belt system.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:52 PM
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i guess i just forgot how crappy old cars steer, after driving newer stuff with racks for so many years.......bump steer sucks.
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:21 AM
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Here in Portland Oregon at PIR, Portland International Raceway, there is a one a day week Street Rod event that attracts a huge crowd during the summer months. Packed with all sorts of Cars, Pickups, Motor Cycles and oddities. Some I wonder how they can even be driven !!

I've seen many very strange front and rear suspension "Set Ups". Some are obvious Dangerous from a casual observation. Not just the installation like poor welding, but the general design is flawed and obvious just looking at the installation. And especially obvious in the home brewed Rack & Pinion installations. As written,, not adhering to the proper inner pivot points on the Rack to the Controls Arms inner pivots. Makes Me Shiver.

Sure I have a Rack on my '56 Chevy and other mod's. But I stick with purchasing Steering Kits and other components like tubular control arms and dropped spindles from major suppliers that are also the manufacture, design their components and have a Top reputation and decades of experience. I am a retired engineer, and I use caution with all suspension components, it's complicated.

As far as King Pin suspension, a 50 Ford still has upper & lower control arms. So one still must Engineer a Rack with the proper inner pivots or have one made to fit, and a host of other vehicle specific parts. Engineering a R&P kit for any Car is a feat of Engineering, it is complicated and generally a CAD software program is necessary.

I'm not going to make a recommendation as i have Zero experience with Shoe Box Rack kits. But one can complete a few searches. Dong so you'll find a major supplier that makes and sells a complete kit. And do know that all the R&P kits are expensive. But, having installed a few and the kit in my '56 Chevy, it was worth every penny !!
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