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Old 01-10-2020, 10:29 AM
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Timing cover

I’m new to the forums and I hope to learn from all of you anyway I have acouple broke bolts in the block and I’ve never used an extractor so I tried and it didn’t turn out well, so my question is what is the best way to get them out, do I try and drill threw and just heli coil or is there a better way

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Old 01-10-2020, 10:54 AM
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1) extractors never work
2) if the threads are messed up, go ahead and helicoil
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:57 AM
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Helicoils work.

Example:
I used helicoils when I replaced the stock 3/8” pressed in rocker studs with BB Chevrolet 7/16” screw in rocker studs in some vintage 1963 Pontiac 421 HO heads. The reason I used helicoils was because the stud holes in the Pontiac heads were too large for the BB Chevrolet threads.

If I had to do that again, I would let the auto machine builder I use do it. They have the tools and machine to do a quick and accurate job. The shop I regularly use will do that to a pair of SB Chevrolet heads for $60 if you use studs without a jam nut or $100 for studs with a jam nut.

I will be doing that to a pair of SB Chevrolet double hump heads.
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Old 01-10-2020, 06:20 PM
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It really depends on "how" the bolt is broken. If it is broken off more or less flat, then you can center punch it and start off with a small drill size, then work up to the correct size for your extractor bit. When putting the extractor bit in, you need to tap it with a ballpeen hammer a few times to seat it. A bit of penetrating oil around the broken bolt and then some minor heat from a propane torch will usually let you back it out. Do not go crazy on applying torque to get it out - this is where most users end up snapping the extractor off. It's better to twist a bit and then reseat the extractor with a few taps and twist again. Easy and slow will usually get most broken bolts out.



Now if the bolt is broken at a angle or has a ridge in it, it can still be done but it's best to use a Dremel or other small grinding bit to flatten it as much as possible, then proceed as above.
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Old 01-10-2020, 07:32 PM
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If you have a welder, keep adding rod to the bolt until it sticks out enough to weld a nut to the blob you added to the bolt.
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:17 PM
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Timing cover bolts are hard to work because they are small.
Keeping a drill centered on the hardened bolt and softer block will make the drill bit wonder.
Aside from a mill, how many bolts and where they are in the cover you might just leave them out. I’ve done that before without any leaks.
The Welding in a nut trick works well. I like to shoot a squirt or PB blaster on it when it’s still hot from the welder. The heat pulls in the solvents by capillary action and aids in removal.
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Old 01-12-2020, 10:31 AM
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Much appreciated fellas the welder trick I’ve heard of before but a buddy and I tried to drill them out and wow what a real treat that was(sarcastic) but we were able to get a bit of a ground down bolt to work, and to leave the bolts out was something I was going to do but I felt maybe pressure would cause it to just leak again but found that it don’t get much
I’ve felt with oil leaks for a year and tried 5 different oil pain gaskets thinking maybe it was it but no, after a year I figured maybe try the chain cover but the motor was redone so I never thought about that until I was just about finished trying but I love the truck and just want it to stop bleeding out lol, I hope to watch these threads and learn a lot from all of you again thank you and I think I may have it
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Old 01-12-2020, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daddyj12002 View Post
Much appreciated fellas the welder trick Iíve heard of before but a buddy and I tried to drill them out and wow what a real treat that was(sarcastic) but we were able to get a bit of a ground down bolt to work, and to leave the bolts out was something I was going to do but I felt maybe pressure would cause it to just leak again but found that it donít get much
Iíve felt with oil leaks for a year and tried 5 different oil pain gaskets thinking maybe it was it but no, after a year I figured maybe try the chain cover but the motor was redone so I never thought about that until I was just about finished trying but I love the truck and just want it to stop bleeding out lol, I hope to watch these threads and learn a lot from all of you again thank you and I think I may have it
The SBC uses several different pan gasket thicknesses in the chin area, you have to know what the timing cover is in gasket depth and that drives the gasket selection. Cross breeding years and using aftermarket covers gets to be a hassle to find the right gasket.

Bogie
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