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Old 07-23-2020, 10:48 AM
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Welded once in my life, try install MII?

As the title says, I have welded once in my life. I am about to order MII and install myself. I'm pretty confident that I can set it up. I watched a fair share of installs. No problem.
Well, since I don't have a welder, I started looking at them since I need to tack the parts in place, check everything out by mocking up fenders, then fully weld. I started thinking that maybe since I am purchasing already, maybe I should buy a MIG. I want to do body repairs as well to my windshield channel and start into minor fabrication anyway. Then I started to believe that I just might be able to weld in my cross-member and perches instead of hiring a welder and put the cost of welder into a nice MIG with gas.
I dunno, maybe I'm being too optimistic about this. My sisters good friend is a certified welder and I'm sure he can check out my work. Heck, I'd just have him do the work except he's really expensive too.
This is a critical part as well, so that's why I'm asking or I probably would have just done it. Thoughts?

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Old 07-23-2020, 12:22 PM
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Buy the mig. With a little practice it's fairly easy to make functional welds. Maybe not too pretty yet but you will get better the more you use it.

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Old 07-23-2020, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsm1847 View Post
I need to tack the parts in place
Tacking in several spots is very important because welds shrink as they cool and want to pull things around and if you don't tack things in place, just start welding in one spot, things end up pointing at weird angles...

Also, excess heating in one spot has to be avoided in thin sheet metal as it can cause buckling... have to skip around and weld a little here and there... take your time... or spend a lot more time later trying to correct it...

I bought a stick welder many moons back (early 1960's), then a gas welder (1970's), then a stitch welder, then a MIG welder... it just sort of happened...

There's a thread on here somewhere about improving/stabilizing the low priced Harbor Freight MIG welders...
.
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:34 PM
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X3 on buying the MIG with gas.
Even a Hobart or Lincoln without about 180 amps and 220v input will do anything you will ever need it too.
Farming out the work is a one time expense with little return while buying the tool provides you with a skill no one can ever take from you and provides a solution for a lifetime.
Maybe you can find a person, for a 30pck, come over and help you get some basics down.
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Timtbss308 View Post
Buy the mig. With a little practice it's fairly easy to make functional welds. Maybe not too pretty yet but you will get better the more you use it.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
I fully intend on making my welds pretty...hahahaha, or at least work on getting there! I'm just worried about it being structurally sound. But I'm a hands on guy, I don't see why I couldn't. I worry about penetration of the metal...
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzzLOL View Post
Tacking in several spots is very important because welds shrink as they cool and want to pull things around and if you don't tack things in place, just start welding in one spot, things end up pointing at weird angles...

Also, excess heating in one spot has to be avoided in thin sheet metal as it can cause buckling... have to skip around and weld a little here and there... take your time... or spend a lot more time later trying to correct it...

I bought a stick welder many moons back (early 1960's), then a gas welder (1970's), then a stitch welder, then a MIG welder... it just sort of happened...

There's a thread on here somewhere about improving/stabilizing the low priced Harbor Freight MIG welders...
.
Yes sir, I am looking at a Harbor Freight Titanium 140 or 170 MIG. A lot of welders that are certified have reviewed it and really like it.
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:40 PM
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X3 on buying the MIG with gas.
Even a Hobart or Lincoln without about 180 amps and 220v input will do anything you will ever need it too.
Farming out the work is a one time expense with little return while buying the tool provides you with a skill no one can ever take from you and provides a solution for a lifetime.
Maybe you can find a person, for a 30pck, come over and help you get some basics down.
Dang, SWEET guys! I guess no one is concerned if I will make welds that will hold? I guess I'm going for the MIG!!!
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:57 PM
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Practice, practice, Practice ! Cut your welds apart and check penetracion. Keep doing it untill you're happy with the results. Good Luck.


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Old 07-23-2020, 01:09 PM
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Yes sir, I am looking at a Harbor Freight Titanium 140 or 170 MIG. A lot of welders that are certified have reviewed it and really like it.

Don't do it.
Where are you gonna find parts for it in 5 or 10 years, maybe even next week when they change vendors?

My welder is 15 years old, bought it new for $500. I can buy any parts I need from my local welding store or online or even from Lincoln. I'll bet you can't say that about the HF.
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Old 07-23-2020, 01:42 PM
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Don't do it.
Where are you gonna find parts for it in 5 or 10 years, maybe even next week when they change vendors?

My welder is 15 years old, bought it new for $500. I can buy any parts I need from my local welding store or online or even from Lincoln. I'll bet you can't say that about the HF.
I actually started looking on Craigslist for a Miller or Lincoln. If I can't find a good deal, I'll proly go with the HFreight one and buy warranty. They sell like 4 year ones, just grab a new one. But I hear ya for sure, and I will take that into consideration. Thanks for the advice!!!!
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Old 07-23-2020, 02:36 PM
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I have a Hobart that I bought 14-15 years ago, I can go to Arc3 and get any part I need for it. Nice thing about it is so far other than consumables I haven't needed anything. The off-brand stuff can be here today and gone tomorrow as someone else mentioned. The extra money for a brand name is worth it. Tip - put a longer, heavier gauge ground cable on when you get it. It'll pay dividends in better welds down the road.
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Old 07-23-2020, 05:52 PM
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I'm just going to echo what everyone else is saying. Yes, get a 220V MIG, nothing less. Few of us that build our own cars are "certified" welders. You are already doing research which is good. Do a price comparison with HF, Lincoln, Miller, Hobart and Eastwood. MIG is about the shortest learning curve but prep of the items to be welded is also important to get it right. Practice horizontal and vertical welds until you feel good about them, then and only then do some overhead welding. I like the idea of doing it yourself, you'll be much prouder of your ride. Who knows, maybe pick up a couple $$ welding someones project.
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Old 07-23-2020, 06:59 PM
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If you want to learn to weld quickly , either take a course or have someone qualified look over you shoulder , also look over their shoulder . It takes can substantial amount of time to become a competent weldor ! It looks easy until you're the one making the decision !
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Old 07-23-2020, 08:04 PM
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If you want to learn to weld quickly , either take a course or have someone qualified look over you shoulder , also look over their shoulder . It takes can substantial amount of time to become a competent weldor ! It looks easy until you're the one making the decision !
I have a few competent welders I will be calling on. Thanks for the advice!!
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Old 07-23-2020, 10:06 PM
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used name brand.

I bought all my welders used except a HF Titanium Easy-Flux 125 Amp Welder- open box for $ 100. I needed a small portable one to fix farm gates. almost 40 years ago the college where I was teaching automotive closed down their welding program.I bought an airco ac-dc with Hig Freq. Then later a used Lincoln tombsrone for $ 75 that I could easily move to do farm equipment repair. then a Lincoln sp 200 Mig, then a Lincoln square wave tig 255, good weldere hold their value just like any good tools.
subscribe to welding tips and trick youtubes.
https://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/
a friend changed careers and studied all the tig videos and got certified. he did high tech alloys and nucelear components for the next generation reactor prototypes.s.
You need a GOOD helmet. There is a big difference between my Lincoln 3350 and a $ 40 bargain one. and my eye sight is not the best anymore but the new Lincoln is easier to see and I use cheater magnifiers.
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