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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
I am looking to remove my 50 series wide low-profile tires and put on something else for playing at the track.

I was thinking about going to the wreckers tomorrow and looking for some 14 inch rims for the front. Would factory aluminum be a better snag than regular old steel rims?

I would like to accomplish two things;

Shave some weight off of my current wide-tire combination.

Decrease the side profile & pump about 40lbs of air into them when racing to decrease rolling resistance.

I would like to add a pair of 10/90 adjustable shocks in the front, thinking this might be good form as well.

Am I on the correct path? Anything else I should do? This effort is going to be applied to a '74 Chevy p/u. I went racing a couple weeks ago, & now I am having fun!

Thanks for any suggestions! :thumbup:
 

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You are on track with everything in your post except going down to 14" diameter on the front. The bigger diameter, tallest side wall, and as skinny as possible, blown up hard, for the least rolling resistance. Think like 1870's wagon wheel, tall and skinny for the least rolling resistance. Aluminum is nice for the weight savings if you can fine a narrow enough rim at the yard.

90/10 shocks help, but you will get more from just unhooking the sway bar from the A-arms and temporarily tying the ends up out of the way with baling wire, as the bar limits and slows front end rise.

Don't expect much from all of these mods if you don't have sticky rear tires and some sort of rear traction bar set-up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!

so, if you were going to take care of tires for the front, what size would you look for? The back tires are 26" in height, would taller front tires matter any?

As long as they are skinny, that is okay?
 

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Skinny with as stiff a sidewall as possible. I run on my 10 second Nova what is typical for a great portion of street/strip cars: 15" x 3.5" or 4.5" wheel and a 165/R 15 tire (27" tall, also found as 165/80-15: for VW Beetle, Karman Ghia, MG's) that has a 4.5-5" wide tread. I have also regularly seen 185/75-15 and 195/75-15 used on 4.5" or 5" wide rims.

I probably wouldn't recommend the 15 x 3.5" and 165 tire combo with the weight of your truck unless it is half fiberglass, this size tire only has a 1200 pound weight rating.

Going with taller tires for the front than the back doesn't hurt anything, just looks a little funny.
 

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ericnova72 said:
Skinny with as stiff a sidewall as possible. I run on my 10 second Nova what is typical for a great portion of street/strip cars: 15" x 3.5" or 4.5" wheel and a 165/R 15 tire (27" tall, also found as 165/80-15: for VW Beetle, Karman Ghia, MG's) that has a 4.5-5" wide tread. I have also regularly seen 185/75-15 and 195/75-15 used on 4.5" or 5" wide rims.

I probably wouldn't recommend the 15 x 3.5" and 165 tire combo with the weight of your truck unless it is half fiberglass, this size tire only has a 1200 pound weight rating.

Going with taller tires for the front than the back doesn't hurt anything, just looks a little funny.
ericnova72,
Would putting a taller front tire on the front do anything for weight transfer to the rear? I don't know, just asking.
 

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S10 Racer said:
ericnova72,
Would putting a taller front tire on the front do anything for weight transfer to the rear? I don't know, just asking.
Yes, but it is the tiniest gain imaginable, and it is static weight. Going 1" bigger on the tire diameter is only 1/2" raise on the front ride height(1/2 of diameter change). This amounts to 0.10-0.25%(far less than 1%) change in static weight on the rear tires. But it isn't transferred during launch, it is transferred the minute you bolt the tire on.

Weight transfer is a misleading term, what it really is is load transfer,you are transferring load from the front springs to the rear springs and it only happens when the front end is moving up on the suspension and stops when the front end tops out(limit of travel) or the front tires lift from the ground(100% of weight on rear tires).

Best for weight transfer is to have the front suspension at the low point of its travel at rest so that it has the maximum amount of upward travel possible until it either tops out, stops rising because the vehicle is moving forward enough that torque is no longer just trying to lift the car, or the front leaves the ground putting all the weight on the rear tires. This is the reason for soft front drag springs, longer than stock 90/10 shocks(so they aren't the limiter), cutting or removing the upper a-arm stops that limit upward travel so the suspension can come up higher.

Shoot for 5" of front travel or more from the at rest position to the topped out position to help maximize transfer.
 
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