Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm told there is no such head casting number 14102183... I'm also told they do exist... I don't see the 14102183 on many list online, what I do see 14101083 and also a 14102193 and the 191...... I'm told the 183 is an 87 to 95 GM 350...It's a TBI head I'm told with swirl ports... Here is a few pics I took of what the number I am seeing on right bank head... I've checked nearly every site possible and still no listing for the 183 heads.... Any suggestions ,information would be great, debating on rebuilding current engine or just pulling a junk yard motor... If the latter what engine block cast number and year, make and model it would be in may be a route I go... Any suggestions would be appreciated... My first engine rebuild fyi...No, I do not have the engine block cast #..
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior Wood
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive exterior Rim
Automotive tire Automotive lighting Automotive wheel system Rim Motor vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
That is the 193 head common production heads in the early 90’s for TBI engine as you have found. If your looking for hot rod build, them heads then heads are not worth putting any money into. Them heads are most likely not even rebuilding for a stock rebuild. The amount you would spend you can get new aluminum heads that will be better in every way.
The block will most likely be a good block and prepared for a roller cam. Regardless of plan for build you will want to convert it to a roller cam.

Now what are you working on? What are looking to do with it? This will help decide if you are better with used junk yard engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,728 Posts
those are 193 TBI heads used 1987-1995. They have a swirl vane in the intake port, an odd intake manifold bolt angle on the center plenum bolts of 70 degrees to the head‘s machined intake surface instead of the older 90 degrees so non TBI intakes will not bolt up without modification to intake or head to change those particular bolt angles. The other 4 bolts remain at tge original angle and the total count of 6 bolts per head and their locations appear to the casual eye as like the pre 1987 bolt pattern. These heads also appear on some factory crate engines up through current times. The L31 Vortec head is used from 1996 to 2000 on production engines and through current times on specific crate motors these end in 062 and 906 casting numbers and use 4 mounting bolts that are angled as 45 degrees to the machined intake mounting surface of the head.

All heads from 1987 up use self guiding rockers so the push rod is not guided by a slot in the head but pass through a round hole. Self guiding factory rockers have a pair of stamped dimples to either side of the valve stem rubbing surface, earlier push rod guided heads do not have this feature on their rocker arms. Rocker arms and push rods for 1955 -1986 engines and those of 1987 and up engines (certain crate engines excepted) do not require interchang in that self guiding on pushrod guided heads will bind the push rod where non self guiding rockers on unguided push rod heads will not stay positioned on their valve stems.

The TBI, Swirl Port heads came in a low and high compression version. Castings ending with 191 are the large 74 cc chamber low compression head while casting ending in 193 are the small 64 cc high compression version and the most commonly found. These heads all feature a swirl vane in the intake port valve pocket that greatly obstructs flow and limits these engines to about 4500 RPM. They simply cannot flow anymore air on a 350 size engine. These vanes cannot be ported out without discovery the coolant side of the port. These is a marine and appears as an early cast iron Z28/Corvette L98 option motors before tge aluminum 113 head got into production, it also appears on some crate motors head with casting number14101083. This uses the same dual quench combustion chamber as TBI head which is similar to but a little simpler than the L31 chamber while using the same port but without the swirl port vane feature of the TBI heads, these are not a bad head if you can find a pair. they are essentially a return to the Camel Hump head, not quite the same physically but damn close performance wise. Note that these heads are machined in either the older 90 degree six bolt intake pattern or the 87-95, mixed bolt pattern where the plenum bolts are angled at 70 degrees. There are intakes out there from Professional Products or Pro Comp that have an adapter that allows their intake to be used on either of the six bolt patterns. While pretty similar casting the Professional Products is the nicer choice.

Aluminum versus cast iron heads gets you into the squish/quench clearance headache. For best performance that keeps detonation and preignition at bey the Squish/Quench clearance should be kept close to .035 to .045 inch, especially with round dish pistons. Without decking the block or using stepped up crown height pistons to maintain this clearance with aluminum heads and their typically thick head gaskets it’s hard to maintain this clearance. Most aluminum head sellers want you to use a gasket that is .049 to .053 inch thick which when added to the nominal factory deck clearance of .025 inch (often more seldom less) this fives a S/Q of .074 to .078 inch which is not satisfactory for maxed performance.

In the case of Swirl Port, TBI heads these are decent producers of torque and mileage but are not upper end horsepower producers simply because they don’t breath well enough to get to the RPMs where the horsepower lays. Therefore, they are not considered to be worth the investment of rebuilding them for anything other than stock performance overhauls. They do respond to greater lengths of cam duration but additional lift does little for them.

Aluminum heads will work without further modification ot the block or pistons if you use the .026 to .028 inch thick composite gaskets rather than the .049 f to .053 thick composites. The .026/.028 with the nominal deck clearance of .025 gives an overall S/Q clearance of .051/.053 which with aluminum heads works OK for mild performance engines. A third option is to make your own MLS gasket of .030 thick by stacking two ,015 inch Fel Pro shim gaskets per side making a total clearance of .055 inch. So there are some work arounds.

Bogie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Bogie.... Lot of what you said went just a tad bit overhead but I got the jist of what your saying... What I'm after is to build a motor for torque mainly but also would like to hear it give a little rumble... K1500 truck with 3.73 rear end gear, 4l60E transmission... Here is the rest of the info I found about the truck...


CarID 890512770
Brand CHEVROLET
ManufacturerId 792
Catalog GM_C201809
Model
Name Pickup - 03,43,53 Bodystyle (4WD)
ImageUrl
Date
Actual
KolCount 0
KolComment
Vin 2GTEK19K0R1533834
Production_date 11.01.1994
Model_year 1994
Engine (L05) ENGINE,5.7L,8 CYLINDER,TBI
Transmission (M30) Transmission,AT 4-Х SPEED,4L60E,ЭЛЕКТРОН
Model_code K,TK10753
Rpo_codes FK2 (ARM,TORSION BAR,SPRING ADJUST,LH); FK3 (ARM,TORSION BAR,SPRING ADJUST,RH); E63 (BODY EQUIPMENT,FLEETSIDE PICKUP BOX); VG3 (STRIP,FRONT BUMPER IMPACT); JB6 (BRAKE SYSTEM,VACUUM POWER DISC,DRUM); B85 (MOLDING B/S EXTERIOR, BRIGHT); ZY1 (COLOR COMBINATION SOLID); K34 (CRUISE CONTROL,AUTOMATIC,ELECTRONIC); 50U (EXTERIOR COLOR ,PRIMARY,OLYMPIC WHITE); FE9 (FEDERAL EMISSION CERTIFICATION); F44 (CHASSIS EQUIPMENT,HEAVY DUTY); YE9 (SILVERADO/SIERRA CLASSIC/SLE PACKAGE); U16 (TACHOMETER,ENGINE); KNP (COOLING SYSTEM,TRANSMISSION,HEAVY DUTY); V08 (COOLING SYSTEM,HEAVY DUTY); NA5 (EMISSION SYSTEM,FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS); NA1 (EMISSION SYSTEM,LESS THAN 8500 LB GVW); NRQ (EXHAUST,CLOSE COUPLED); 1SZ (PACKAGE OPTION-); R9Z (CONTROL - SALES ITEM NO. 100); TFE (SALES INCENTIVE COMMITMENT PLUS); B32 (COVERING,FLOOR MATS,FRONT AUXILIARY); B33 (COVERING,FLOOR MATS,REAR AUXILIARY); 6GF (SPRING COMPTR SELECT FRT LH); 7GF (SPRING COMPTR SELECT FRT RH); XGL (TIRE FRONT LT265/75R16/C BL R/PE ST OOR(9591657)); K60 (GENERATOR,100 AMPERE); A20 (WINDOW,REAR QUARTER VENT SWING OUT); AJ1 (GLASS,DEEP TINT(REAR SIDE WINDOWS AND REAR DOOR WINDOW)); V22 (GRILLE,RADIATOR(CHROME)); C5S (GVW RATING 6,600 LBS); C60 (AIR CONDITIONER,FRONT,MANUAL CONTROLS); AU3 (LOCK,SIDE DOOR,ELECTRIC); TR9 (LAMP GROUP,COURTESY); C95 (LAMP,INTERIOR,ROOF COURTESY AND DUAL READING); VK3 (LICENSE PLATE,FRONT MOUNTING PACKAGE); Z88 (GMC TRUCK); D45 (MIRROR,OUTSIDE,BELOW EYELINE(STAINLESS STEEL)); MX0 (TRANSMISSION,AUTOMATIC,OVERDRIVE(MERCHANDISING OPTION)); OSG (PLANT CODE OSHAWA, ONT, TRUCK, GM OF CANADA); A31 (WINDOW,ELECTRIC OPERATED,SIDE); GT4 (AXLE,REAR,3.73 RATIO); YD3 (AXLE FRONT (BASE EQUIP) FOR SCHEDULING GVW PLATE); UM6 (RADIO,AM/FM STEREO,CASSETTE,ETR,INCLUDES CLOCK); YD6 (SPRING,REAR(BASE EQUIPMENT)); AM7 (SEAT,REAR FOLDING); YGL (TIRE REAR LT265/75R16/C BL R/PE ST OOR(9591657)); A28 (WINDOW,SLIDING GLASS,REAR WINDOW); N33 (STEERING COLUMN,TILT TYPE); SLL (SALES PROCESSING-SOLD ORDERS); 1SD (PACKAGE-OPTION 04); ZQ2 (DRIVER CONVENIENCE PACKAGE); ZQ3 (DRIVER CONVENIENCE PACKAGE II(MERCHANDISING OPTION)); U66 (SPEAKER SYSTEM,4,DUAL FRONT DASH MOUNTED,DUAL EXTENDED RANGE PACKAGE SHELF/QUARTER); ZGL (TIRE SPARE LT265/75R16/C BL R/PE ST OOR(9591657)); AE7 (SEAT,FRT SPLIT,EASY ENTRY,DRIVER,PASSENGER); SVA (CUP HOLDER); NK3 (STEERING WHEEL,SPORT,SOFT RIM,SIMULATED LEATHER); 64D (TRIM COMBINATION CLOTH, LT BEIGE); 64I (INTERIOR TRIM,LIGHT BEIGE); V73 (VEHICLE STATEMENT - US/CANADA); VXS (LABEL COMPLETE VEHICLE); P06 (RING,WHEEL TRIM); B96 (ORNAMENTATION,EXTERIOR,WHEEL OPENING MOLDING(BRIGHT))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,728 Posts
So what do you want to do with it?

If it still has TBI your pretty limited in making changes because the fuel and ignition values are mapped specific to how that engine and truck were built. There is not a lot of wiggle room for “improvements” that change air flow through the engine. A cam change to about 200 degrees intake and 215 exhaust measured from .050 lift points with around .45-.47 inch total lift and an LSA of 110 degrees or more is pretty much it without needing new programming on the computer chip. The specs on this cam is the upper limit on the stock computer.


The details of how this operates are a little more involved than I’m going to discribe but basically the fuel and ignition are a map that calculates a confluence of throttle position, manifold vacuum and RPM for every conceivable operating event. The fuel quantity to maintain the proper mixture ratio and the needed ignition advance for these events are housed at an address. On the street the computer is taking this data as a sampling of what’s going on many time a second and adjusts the injector fuel flow and ignition timing for and as conditions change. If you change the displacement, the cam timing, or anything else that changes the address that the throttle position, manifold vacuum and rpm relationships the address if it can find one will have the wrong family of instructions living there for the real world conditions because that is not the world that was originally mapped. There is a small learn function that runs off the O2 sensor that is there to make corrections to the contents of addresses as the engine ages. Obviously this is limited but this is what things like the linked Edelbrock cam are taking advantage of. As I said this cam and other similar to it are taking advantage of the O2 sensor’s mixture correction system.

So without a custom chip or converting to a carburetor your choices are pretty limited.

For a truck with a small block there is nothing except an old 400 like the conversion of your 350 to a stroke 383 with either a carb or a stand alone high pressure TBI, unfortunately that leaves the computer dependent 4L60E but there are ways to work that as well.

Basically from 87 up you get more and more rocket science in modern vehicles to where the average person doing any work on these become impossible. Basically with the computer the OEM’s found the way to kill off the independent garages.

Obviously pre 1987 is mostly old technology that do it yourselfers can deal with. 1987-1991 before the transmission got hooked to the computer are pretty easy to mess with. 92 through 95 engine wise are the same as 87-91 but the transmission becomes computer controlled, 87-95 is On Board Diagnostics I or OBD I. 1996 brings OBD II which is a quantum increase in computers and systems integration, this is really NASA level complication and it gets increasingly so the closer you get to the current data. These are not impossible to work on but some to a lot of college or relevant 2 year technical school is mighty helpful as is a host of very expensive tools. Or you have to take to an expert in modifications. The simple reason the large cities are investing in community transportation and things like UBER exist is the modern vehicle in the context of a used vehicle is too costly for the average wage owner to maintain. Once the supply of pre 1996 vehicles is exhausted the average wage earner will be on public transportation. Detroit being the canary in the coal mine is already starting to remove freeways. You will see this grow in the next decades as the commuter culture dies.

Bogie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So what do you want to do with it?

If it still has TBI your pretty limited in making changes because the fuel and ignition values are mapped specific to how that engine and truck were built. There is not a lot of wiggle room for “improvements” that change air flow through the engine. A cam change to about 200 degrees intake and 215 exhaust measured from .050 lift points with around .45-.47 inch total lift and an LSA of 110 degrees or more is pretty much it without needing new programming on the computer chip. The specs on this cam is the upper limit on the stock computer.


The details of how this operates are a little more involved than I’m going to discribe but basically the fuel and ignition are a map that calculates a confluence of throttle position, manifold vacuum and RPM for every conceivable operating event. The fuel quantity to maintain the proper mixture ratio and the needed ignition advance for these events are housed at an address. On the street the computer is taking this data as a sampling of what’s going on many time a second and adjusts the injector fuel flow and ignition timing for and as conditions change. If you change the displacement, the cam timing, or anything else that changes the address that the throttle position, manifold vacuum and rpm relationships the address if it can find one will have the wrong family of instructions living there for the real world conditions because that is not the world that was originally mapped. There is a small learn function that runs off the O2 sensor that is there to make corrections to the contents of addresses as the engine ages. Obviously this is limited but this is what things like the linked Edelbrock cam are taking advantage of. As I said this cam and other similar to it are taking advantage of the O2 sensor’s mixture correction system.

So without a custom chip or converting to a carburetor your choices are pretty limited.

For a truck with a small block there is nothing except an old 400 like the conversion of your 350 to a stroke 383 with either a carb or a stand alone high pressure TBI, unfortunately that leaves the computer dependent 4L60E but there are ways to work that as well.

Basically from 87 up you get more and more rocket science in modern vehicles to where the average person doing any work on these become impossible. Basically with the computer the OEM’s found the way to kill off the independent garages.

Obviously pre 1987 is mostly old technology that do it yourselfers can deal with. 1987-1991 before the transmission got hooked to the computer are pretty easy to mess with. 92 through 95 engine wise are the same as 87-91 but the transmission becomes computer controlled, 87-95 is On Board Diagnostics I or OBD I. 1996 brings OBD II which is a quantum increase in computers and systems integration, this is really NASA level complication and it gets increasingly so the closer you get to the current data. These are not impossible to work on but some to a lot of college or relevant 2 year technical school is mighty helpful as is a host of very expensive tools. Or you have to take to an expert in modifications. The simple reason the large cities are investing in community transportation and things like UBER exist is the modern vehicle in the context of a used vehicle is too costly for the average wage owner to maintain. Once the supply of pre 1996 vehicles is exhausted the average wage earner will be on public transportation. Detroit being the canary in the coal mine is already starting to remove freeways. You will see this grow in the next decades as the commuter culture dies.

Bogie

After some research and phone calls, believe what's best would be start from a bare block and just build the engine and run the engine in the truck until it pops...Not sure if I want to replace if it goes... For a 94 GMC, I like the body style and replaced a lot of chassis parts and front axles... I may just build a motor and put it in a different older truck that needs an engine... I don't know just yet now....
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top