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Discussion Starter #1
New to the site. I recently picked up a 1939 plymouth out of a farmers field. Has no tires or axles. Frame and floors look good and only one bullet hole in the glass. No motor or transmission. Looking to build this up. I picked up a 1977 mustang ghia as i had read a little about mustang ii front ends. I have never done this type of swap before. Looking for some pointers or a starting point on this swap. Was thinking of stubbing it but really not sure of how that works with such drastic differences in frame setups.
 

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my son has a 36 coupe that had the tube front axle I think your 39 would have the same frame design, you can cut out the M II front crosmember and swap it in. the weldeer series company makes weld it your self swap kits and has excellent directions on installing a M II front end, their directions will help if installing a stock M II crosmember https://assets.adobe.com/public/189346d8-00f3-41e6-4c58-dc618a54dd23
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the help. Only issue i may have is establishing axle centerlines since there is no axles on the car at this point. Im at work right now so havent had a chance to read the full instruction but any info helps. Thanks again.
 

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Centrelines not hard to do.
Jack stands, a level clean floor, some chalk, plumb bobs, tape measure and mock it up on the floor.
You should find some books.
Chassis fab, how to’s like how to build a hot rod etc.
Where in the great land of the Canuck do you live?
 

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I lived everywhere in Alberta except Edmonton. Used to drive there for a little racing. 50 years of 40 below so I retired to the coast.
Like I said.
Get some books.
Should be some at any speed shop.
 

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stock frame dimensions I printed the chassis diagram for my sons 36 off the internet and a quick search shows prints for the 39 plymouth there
is a forum of plymouth and dodge classic cars and there is a lot of info there.
 

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If the rubber bump stops are still there you can get a pretty close location of the axle locations and square your dimensions from the bolt holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I will have to take a look into that. I really just got the two cars and off the trailer. Prepping the house and garage for the winter right now. Just want to get what ever info i can so when i dive into these cars its not a couple days of scratching my head. Thanks for the advice. I will be looking into it as soon as i get done getting ready for the -40 temps.
 

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If the rubber bump stops are still there you can get a pretty close location of the axle locations and square your dimensions from the bolt holes.

Can't agree with lining up axle to factory locations. My 41 Chrysler looked terrible at the factory location.
I believe it was too far forward.
Get the car at ride height, place the wheel in the hole and see where it looks best.
Ride height changes change the look.

524508





524509
 

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Excellent point the suspension needs to be loaded at ride height. leaf springs can flatten out and move the axle .. I have a glass 32 project up on the top rack in the shop and reading other posts they say the stock rear location looks wrong with fenders. k
Can't agree with lining up axle to factory locations. My 41 Chrysler looked terrible at the factory location.
I believe it was too far forward.
Get the car at ride height, place the wheel in the hole and see where it looks best.
Ride height changes change the look.

View attachment 524508




View attachment 524509
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So how would i do this at ride height with no driveline in the car? You are saying the suspension would have to be under load correct?
 

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Hafta say I agree (strongly) about not relying on the orig. wheelbase dimension for a lowered car, if that's what you're looking for. Of course you can't load the suspension up so early in the process but instead leave the springs out and use 5/8 threaded rod or whatever will fit in the shock holes, plus whatever you would have to make such as a welded-on "T" tube or just a big nut to fake the lower shock mount, and tie everything together tight at what the eventual at-rest geometry should be (i.e., lower control arms level as measured from pivot points). Mock it all up on the floor to the ride height you want, using the tire-wheel you plan on, and the crossmember at the correct angle etc. and stare at it for a few days to make sure it's what you like. You will be doing a lot of fab work and kinda returning to how it was done before all the ready-made crossmember kits came out, which can use the MII parts and take much of the figuring out of the deal if you want to just pay the cost. Keep in mind an original MII suspension can be a pain to chisel/drill out of it's frame and was designed to work with a 13" wheel and may not be adjustable back to the castor angle you'd want, you'd have to check on that yourself, with a kit you can get whatever. BTW 5.5" ground height at the rr bottom of the front fender to the ground is a nice practical number if you do plan on having it lowered.

Do a good job of this and you'll love the results.
 

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Of course you can't load the suspension up so early in the process but instead leave the springs out and use 5/8 threaded rod or whatever will fit in the shock holes

That's what I have. I Made some rods with cross tubes at top and bottom to match coil over heights. They bolt on in place of the shocks.

I believe the pic on the hoist above didn't have the rear end bolted in place yet. It was sitting on the tranny jack.
 

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it depends on the suspension... for the front Mustang II Pinto (most parts interchanged) When I was an engineer at Ford I mentored a young racer and printed of the suspension specs. the spring chart listed spring rates for various options and gave the ride height, there were about 20 front coil springs. after market-performance suspensin companies , reccomend weigh each corner then calculate the spring you will need, If you go with original type leaf rear you can play with the number and leaf length to get the ride and load capacity. Shops can re-arch the springs. I have used a hyd press and chalk marked an inch apart and slowly re-archen my front main leaf to "reverse the eyes" springs
So how would i do this at ride height with no driveline in the car? You are saying the suspension would have to be under load correct?
 

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You said no axles so I assume no rear springs, You might check the 30's to 50's forum to find what will work for rear suspension,
We have a pinto wagon front suspension for the 36 an a lincoln 8.8 disc for the rear, setting on the stock leaf springs. for the front I have a set of granada discs so the wheel pattern matches Welder series sells the weld it your self for the granada rotors and calipers., Some people make brackets to use newer mustang dual piston calipers
 

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if you want a narrow rear end the Mustang 5.0 forums list using a 5.0 8. 8 and limited slip housing, 5 lug ranger pickup shafts. They are different side to side, and Lincoln 8.8 rear discs. I have put them together in the wrecking yards to get what I needed. there are articles about narrowing an explorer 8.8 that is a little stronger. The old plymouth and fords used the 5 on 4.5 wheel pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It has rear leafs but driver side is missing alot of the leafs. I think there are two left.
524520
this is what im working with.
 

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Nice project car. Looks solid.
 
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