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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I Have in My possession a 1969 Chevy k10 (obviously by the title) but I'm about to get in a buying spree for upgrades to give this ol gal some Getty up and go but my only thing is that I'm unsure of what I want and what kind of header ,cam ,and manifold I wanna run mostly gonna be a cruise around town kind of truck but I'd like to play around and make it raise some eye brows when I get on it any one build a 69 Chevy 350? Got any advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So I Have in My possession a 1969 Chevy k10 (obviously by the title) but I'm about to get in a buying spree for upgrades to give this ol gal some Getty up and go but my only thing is that I'm unsure of what I want and what kind of header ,cam ,and manifold I wanna run mostly gonna be a cruise around town kind of truck but I'd like to play around and make it raise some eye brows when I get on it any one build a 69 Chevy 350? Got any advice?
Mostly wanting to use it for street properties won't really be pulling anything
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1969 was 53 years ago , does your truck have its original engine ? Good to know what you're starting with .
Honestly I believe so I'm the third owner of the pickup I'm new to the old school stuff but not new on how to build it and I haven't gotten under it to see what the rear end has for gearing 235/65/15 I'm assuming what ever stock gearing is for that year with the 4spd in the floor
 

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Could be nearly any small block in there depending on whether or not it's original or factory. 69s could come with a 307, 327, or 350. If it's original, it wouldn't be a 283 as the last year for those in the C/K pickups was 66 or 67. The 307 replaced the 283 as the baby SBC.
 

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Big heavy truck with lots of gears at both ends. Minimum is a 383 built on a 4 bolt block. Best is a 454 as these are torque monsters and for a pick up torque is just the medicine needed. Money sunk into a 307 or 350 in a big truck mostly disappears with little return in performance. All performance mods of cam and breathing while improving torque and power move these features further up the RPM band forcing you to chase them with gearing or faster road speeds. Obviously faster toad speeds are limited by law so without changing the gears it’s easy to get into a situation where the engine is operating much of its time under its best rpm zones which guzzles gas and increases wear for little to no perceptible performance improvement.

Bogie
 

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Big and heavy is right.
Run that joker across the scales at your local recycling place, or dump, or gravel pit. 4WD makes it even heavier, and like Bogie said all those extra moving parts.
It can be done. I was at the Machine Shop the other day picking up a motor, and the guy running the place was talking about how trucks automatically eat up a hundred horsepower. Which is pretty much true. I think just the sheer length of spaghetti frame, and the weight of it, and the shaped like a brick all add up.
I got my 78 to run pretty good, but it took a 406 and a lot of go-fast goodies! And in the grand scheme of things it's still not even fast...
If I had it to do over again I would have a nice big block in there!
 

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It's never going to be fast (especially shifting a truck tranny) - but if it is a stock original engine (327, 350 not a 307), and you want a little street cred, some fun, and some sound without killing the street performance..........

If it has an original QJet - keep it and put on a spread bore manifold like an Edelbrock Performer 2101. Even has provisions for the factory choke on that manifold. Q-jet is plenty big enough and a decent carb for economy. Don't forget some pretty valve covers, and a re-curved HEI distributor. 1 5/8" full length tube headers, with 2.5" exhaust run out the back or in front of the rear wheels.

If not original Qjet, I vote for a square flange dual plane intake of which you have countless choices, and a 650 Holley VS.

You may want to keep that original camshaft, as there is little for you to gain in the torque dept without good heads, and a 1969 is not a big emissions engine.

But if you just have to have some lope at idle, pretty much anyone's flat tappet hydraulic somewhere around 270 degrees advertised duration and 110 LCA should get you there. But there will be a price to pay for it with a risk of failed break-in, lower torque at low RPM, poorer fuel mileage, and a need for upgraded valve springs if you're going to get over 5000 rpm.

A nice 69 4x4 is a VERY desirable truck - worth a lot of bucks - that in itself is cool! Put some trim ring wheels with some wider truck tires (not tall - my personal preference) along with the intake and headers and you'll be all set! Don't loose any of the original pieces that you take off.

Best wishes
 

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I would get small diameter long tube headers, decent intake (and or carb), not sure I would go to the trouble of a cam swap on an old engine.
If you re gasket/ring bearing the engine then then go to a shim gasket if possible, freshen heads and consider a 208-212º @ .05 cam. If heads are junk then budget replace with better.
260-300 hp is easy and not expensive
 

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It's never going to be fast (especially shifting a truck tranny) - but if it is a stock original engine (327, 350 not a 307), and you want a little street cred, some fun, and some sound without killing the street performance..........

If it has an original QJet - keep it and put on a spread bore manifold like an Edelbrock Performer 2101. Even has provisions for the factory choke on that manifold. Q-jet is plenty big enough and a decent carb for economy. Don't forget some pretty valve covers, and a re-curved HEI distributor. 1 5/8" full length tube headers, with 2.5" exhaust run out the back or in front of the rear wheels.

If not original Qjet, I vote for a square flange dual plane intake of which you have countless choices, and a 650 Holley VS.

You may want to keep that original camshaft, as there is little for you to gain in the torque dept without good heads, and a 1969 is not a big emissions engine.

But if you just have to have some lope at idle, pretty much anyone's flat tappet hydraulic somewhere around 270 degrees advertised duration and 110 LCA should get you there. But there will be a price to pay for it with a risk of failed break-in, lower torque at low RPM, poorer fuel mileage, and a need for upgraded valve springs if you're going to get over 5000 rpm.

A nice 69 4x4 is a VERY desirable truck - worth a lot of bucks - that in itself is cool! Put some trim ring wheels with some wider truck tires (not tall - my personal preference) along with the intake and headers and you'll be all set! Don't loose any of the original pieces that you take off.

Best wishes
what is LCA?
 

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Ok do yourself a favor.
Write everything you know down on a piece of paper as you find it out.

Make a folder on your computer named "69 k10.
Open up "notepad" that is a .txt file which all computers can read.
Save the file as engine
Save another as transmission
So on
Then drop these into "69 k10 engine" etc folders inside the "69 k10 folder".

As you do your detective work to find exactly what you have and replace parts will have a record.

Write down things like part numbers as you replace them and can easily adjust/save the text files.
You can also "save page" when you buy things and drop them into a folder.

This makes buying or replacing parts SO much easier when you need to replace something in 5 years.
It is also like gold to the next buyer who has saved hours of detective work.

I always ask the previous owner to tell me or have everything ready to tell me everything they know about the vechicle before meeting and again as we are finalizing the sale. Otherwise you fall into doing hours of detective work.

Sometimes you can find these things out after the fact from the previous owner. But generally it is considered rude to ask after the fact.
 

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yes, and you have 2 different lobes? what LCA are you talking about? "LSA" of 110º makes sense.
if both lobes are on 110º that would not be a good cam for mild/stockish engine. Usually "ICL" is 108º or tighter and "ECL" is 108º or wider. Please explain in detail what you had in mind? (always wanting to learn?)
 

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In my view LCA is just another name for LSA. LCA = Angle between intake and exhaust lobe centers. LSA = angle of separation between intake and exhaust lobes. Same thing.

Cam with 110 LCA/LSA is usually ground/installed 4 degrees advanced, putting the ICL at 106. This is the typical run of the mill hydraulic performance cam. But I think you probably know this and may just want to argue about terminology.

Nevertheless cam with 112 LSA amd same duration will idle smoother due to less overlap. Cam with 108 LSA and same duration will have a much poorer idle and low vacuum due to more overlap. I suggested the 110 LSA as a compromise cam that would sound decent and still be streetable, if that is the goal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My apologies I'm am about as stupid as they come you guys have alot of good advice but I can't smack myself hard enough turns to find out it's a C10 not a k10 I should take this post down and re start it I'm so sorry hopefully this doesn't change to much of the information
 
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