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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there fellow hotrodders.
I'm having an issue with my classic c20. It likes to get hot. But not fast. Usually takes a quite a bit of driving before it heats up.
Little back story. My GPA and I built it over 15 years he recently passed and I got truck. Since I've gotten it I put a new aluminum radiator with dual cooling fans set to 180 switch. Has a new 160 degree thermostat. Truck has 1000miles since restoration. Timing is set to 34 degrees at 2800 rpm. Can't put my finger on why it gets hot after about 30 to 45 min of driving. It dosnt just boil over it slowly. It creeps up. I'm running straight coolant in it. Also I do live in Southern Florida and we are battling a pretty hot summer. However I've had older carborated engines before and none of them ever went past 210. There's something I'm missing. Maybe someone out there has an idea. I'm stumped.
 

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Straight 100% anti-freeze/coolant....not the reccommended 50/50 mix??

It will run hot because of that....it needs at least 30% water mix to work as designed.

Too low(retarded) ignition timing will create heat build-up, either from both too low mechanical timing or a disconnected/faulty vacuum advance mechanism.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Straight 100% anti-freeze/coolant....not the reccommended 50/50 mix??

It will run hot because of that....it needs at least 30% water mix to work as designed.

Too low(retarded) ignition timing will create heat build-up, either from both too low mechanical timing or a disconnected/faulty vacuum advance mechanism.

Ok thanks. I'll check the vacuumed advance and add some water and re test drive. Again thanks for the info.
 

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Straight coolant as in waterless will run hotter than 50/50 or water, this is to be expected. With waterless you can expect that it will top out around 210 to 220. Waterless does not conduct heat as well as mixes and straight water it however offers little to no corrosion issues and will tolerate temperatures around 370F without needed a pressure cap to prevent boiling so it keeps the really hot spots wet so heat is being conducted away where with 50/50 or water your likely to have local boiling even with a pressure cap.

To some extent you’re seeing a new dynamic that you need to get familiar with and test to see where the temps stabilize. Or go back to 50/50 in which case you should use deionized water to keep whatever local chemistry of your tap water out of the engine.

Bogie
 
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