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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All - I'm rebuilding a 200-4r and have a rebuilding book but I don't see anything about being able to check the pressure as I build. I rebuilt my TH350 before and was able to check that the clutches were working with an air compressor at a few spots in the case or the clutches. Can you do the same for a 200-4r? If so, with which ports / holes?

Thanks,
Brad

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You can and should air check the clutches. I just finished a rebuild on a 200-4R. The lo/reverse clutch housing has a port on the side (you also need to be sure this port lines up with the hole in the case when you reassemble it). The forward clutch housing has a port on the shaft - it's the one between the two teflon rings. Same thing with the overdrive clutch - the port between the two rings on the input shaft. The direct clutch and overrun clutch require the center support to be in place to provide air. Do this once the parts are in the case. The two bolts that hold the center support are hollow. One will air check the direct clutch, the other the overrun clutch.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Joe (or anyone else) - question on air-checking the clutches. We've made progress to the point where we believe we have the low-reverse setup all ready to go (all the way through the output shaft snap-ring and endplay check). We air-checked the low-reverse clutch through the hole in the housing / case and you could clearly hear the clutch engaging. However, I would have thought that the clutch engaging would compress the low-reverse clutch steels and friction. Those didn't seem to move / compress at all. The pack of steels and clutches are quite loose (looking through the opening in the case) but I believe we have the rear assembly high enough as its lined up with the parking pawl and the clutch is low enough as the hole in the clutch is perfectly centered in the hole in the case. Am I just thinking wrong about what the low-reverse air-check should do?

Thanks,
Brad
 

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Hi Joe (or anyone else) - question on air-checking the clutches. We've made progress to the point where we believe we have the low-reverse setup all ready to go (all the way through the output shaft snap-ring and endplay check). We air-checked the low-reverse clutch through the hole in the housing / case and you could clearly hear the clutch engaging. However, I would have thought that the clutch engaging would compress the low-reverse clutch steels and friction. Those didn't seem to move / compress at all. The pack of steels and clutches are quite loose (looking through the opening in the case) but I believe we have the rear assembly high enough as its lined up with the parking pawl and the clutch is low enough as the hole in the clutch is perfectly centered in the hole in the case. Am I just thinking wrong about what the low-reverse air-check should do?

Thanks,
Brad
Brad, double check your lo/rev clutch plate parts stackup. Do you have the wave plate in there also? I did this check with mine and while the clutch plates appeared to be somewhat loose in the case, when I air-checked the clutch they locked right up. I should add that my trans is complete and in the car now and works great. You did verify that the clutch apply ring (#650) is in place on the lo/rev piston, right? The wave plate (#654) goes on top of the last steel.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
UGH - It was the clutch apply! I was about to blame my assembly manual but it does have a line stating to make sure that's in place (just doesn't show it very well in the picture). That makes a ton of sense as that will take up all the empty space. We do at least know the clutch itself is holding air as we can hear and see it move. That's why you check...

Thanks for your help!
Brad
 

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UGH - It was the clutch apply! I was about to blame my assembly manual but it does have a line stating to make sure that's in place (just doesn't show it very well in the picture). That makes a ton of sense as that will take up all the empty space. We do at least know the clutch itself is holding air as we can hear and see it move. That's why you check...

Thanks for your help!
Brad
At least it was easy to find. Glad to help. Keep an eye on those apply rings. There are others in the trans. And also take care that they don't fall out of place while you assemble the parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Me again! We're at the front now and I am really struggling with the overrun clutch lip Seals. I can't get the piston to slide in without catching one of the lips - the inner lip in particular. I have a little lip seal tool but still can't get it. The other pistons slid in so much easier with just a little help from the tool. Any tricks for.the overrun?

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Me again! We're at the front now and I am really struggling with the overrun clutch lip Seals. I can't get the piston to slide in without catching one of the lips - the inner lip in particular. I have a little lip seal tool but still can't get it. The other pistons slid in so much easier with just a little help from the tool. Any tricks for.the overrun?

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I had some trouble with that one also, and I don't have the tools. I used a feeler gauge and just kept working inside and outside until the lips got started. Keep constant light downward pressure on the piston while you do that. Yes, it takes three hands. Also make sure there are no burrs on the edge of the piston.
 
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