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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to figer out what is best for my 30
model a streetrod. I need to know the pros & cons
of boxing my frame or just save my money & buy a
frame from brookville roadster. I haven't decided
on the motor yet. I will be using either a 454 or
a 350 chevy. I allso need to know what all type
of cars that came with a ribbed roof to use as a
filler. Thanks for any help.
 

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This depends on what you are willing to pay and how much work you want to do. I did extensive chassis work on my 33 Ford pickup that included a new IFS, boxed the chassis, new leaf spring set-up, and fabricated motor mounts and trans mounts.
Looking back at what I went through, and what I spent in parts, I would have been better of ordering a new chassis. If you can afford a "rolling" chassis, I say "Go for it!!"
 

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I would agree with Stan. I sell chassis and I hear a lot of stories about ones that are made from originals. It all depends on the time and money you have to dump into your existing frame. You can buy a frame in different stages with tons of different options(I recommend TCI) and all you have to do is paint and assemble. With the original frame you will be doing a lot of fabricating to make new things fit. The one thing you don't want to mess with on a street rod is your chassis/suspension.

Keith
Outlaw Motorsports
 

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Hot Rods are Built, not Bought
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Building your own chassis is easier now than it ever has been. While it is true that it will take some time and effort, it will also be rewarding if you take the time to plan everything out.

The (2) keys to doing the work yourself are:

1.0 Access to materials. I work at a manufacturing facility, therefore enabling access to steel plate and structural components (tubing, angle, barstock, etc.). While I do have to pay for the materials, I get them at reasonable prices.
2.0 Access to the required tools. Hand tools, welder, grinders, clamps, drill press, etc.

I built the chassis for my '31 Model A and for my '27 Roadster Pickup.

The Model A uses the stock frame rails which I boxed full length. I added a new deuce front crossmember and fab'd. everything else myself.

For the "T" I went with new American Stamping rails and a deuce front crossmember and fab'd everything else myself.

Don't be discouraged by the "buy" everything crowd. Remember that real hot rods are built, not bought.
 

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Lost in the 60's
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I have a 30 Model A five window coupe, I boxed my frame myself, Used a duece front crossmember, a TCI center crossmeber and trans mount, Pete and Jakes four bars front and rear and a Chassis Engineering dropped front axle. If you know how to weld it is not a big deal. I am running a 350 300 HP with a 350 trans, Chev 10 bolt rear end 3.73 posi.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi, thanks for all the advice. I have a
millermatic 250x wire welder & I can weld so I
better get started. This is my first streetrod.
I built a pro street 57 chev about 8 years ago,
but I had hawkins speed shop do the tubbing.I
plan on doing everything to my model a.I will be
using a ford 9 inch rear.Either a 4-speed muncie
or turbo 350(I have both),& either a 454 or 350
(I have both also).Thanks again.
 

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If your going to do it start with new rails.70+ year old frame rails are a waste of time on your new streetrod.They were pretty much junk as new and boxing them is really not the way to go.I also build my own chassis's but something has to said for the "buy" everything crowd. If you dont know chassis basic's then buy your first one.You will have to learn camber, bump steer,castor,toe in toe out(with NO help from reputable shop).After that its trying to weld and grind on 70+ year old steel and keep it straight.If you do want to take a big project on by all means buy the rails, but with whats avail now a days its allmost cheaper to buy it because your car is not very rare so....they build a lot of them(also keep and eye to the papers cause there hundreds of that car that never get finished and get sold dirt cheap).If it was a 37 cord i would say stick with your frame.Good Luck
 

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Lost in the 60's
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As far as filling your top goes, I filled my 30 model my self and made mine smooth, I welded that in and kept everything straight, it looks good. I also chopped the top 4 inches and got it all back together and all the glass doing good. If there is a will there is a way , real hot rods are built not bought. David Shands.................. Retired Master Mechanic
 

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frames

I contemplated building my own frame. Then I looked at how long it would take, versus buying one. Wound up buying a TCI stage 3 with independent suspension. Cost was close to $7000.00. I figured to build my own, I would be into it around $3000.00. For me It was well worth it even though I've been around the street rod scene a long time. with me time was everything. Im 63 yrs old. The gentleman who told you that old frames aren't worth boxing may have a point. small hair line cracks can develope in the frame through the years that you might oversee. Best bet if money is an issue is to order just a boxed new frame. You'll be money and time ahead. I have seen them for as low as $5-700.00. lew
 
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