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Discussion Starter #1
hi
i m after a bit of advice.
my engines developed an oil leak.
its comes out of the bell housing of the gearbox next to where its bolted to the engine.
its not trans fluid so the leak is from the engine.
i take it theres an oil seal at the rear end of the crank.
can this seal be replaced with the engine/box still in the car.
im dreading having to take it out as the whole car has to be stripped to get it out.
small car,picture below.
so can it be done in possision and any advice/tips you can offer me.
engines a stock crate ford 302
 

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I have successfully replaced a leaking 2 piece rear main seal while the engine and trans were still in the car.

As you have referenced a "crate engine" I would assume it may be the later 1 piece rear main seal in which case I have seen of people replacing it by pulling just the trans (not the engine).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the reply.
im not really an engine person so its a tad confusing to me.
engine only two years old (from summit) so i take it this would be a one peice seal.
ive heard befor you could replace the two peice one by droping the sump and the crank a little and feeding the new seal in.
can you do this with a one peice seal or do you have to pull the torque convertor of the engine.
because of the size of the car i have to take the interior out to get to the box to unbolt it,hense wether it can all be done in situ
sorry if questions a bit basic.
thanks
wayne
 

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There is indeed a crank seal bach there but they don't really leak that often. What does leak often is the rear seal at the very back of the intake manifold. Usually made of cork, these are famous for squeezing out as the manifold is tightened down. The oil leaks there and runs down the back of the block to where the bellhousing meets it and drips at the bottom. Where it has fooled many a person into thinking the rear main seal is leaking. This got me once too. A real pisser to dig into things that far and discover the main seal to be bone dry.
Rear seals can and do leak but in most cases replacing the intake gaskets is a heck of a lot easier. Don't just look, run your finger back behind the intake area. If you find any oil at all back there I vote for new intake gaskets. Once they were done I'd drive for some time if see if it cured the dripping.
I don't know about your particular configuration but changing intake gaskets isn't that big of a deal usually. I know a few tips and tricks if you're interested.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks

hi
i think you could be right. :thumbup:
i managed to sqeeze my hand behind the manifold and its feels like the cork gasket has pulled away a bit.
plus theres traces of oil there.big puddle under the car :(
i shall pick a new gasket up at the weekend but would appreciate any tips you can offer when fitting the new one.
torques settings.
order of tightening bolts.
do you use any gasket sealant when installing
thanks
wayne
 

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Tip number one. When you get your gaskets, take out the new end seals (corks) and throw them away. Buy a tube of good quality silicone RTV sealant and use a big fat bead of it at each end of the manifold as a substitute for the corks. This isn't just from me, this is common knowledge among small block Ford guys over here. I don't much like RTV sealer anymore and try to avoid using it as much as possible anymore. But I'll be the first to admit it works great in this application. Sooner or later those darn cork gaskets always seem to leak or squeeze out. If you absolutely insist on using the cork type gaskets, folks report that they stay a lot better if the sealing parts of the intake and engine block are "dimpled". This is simply taking a small punch and hammer and giving just these surfaces a golf ball like pattern. Supposed to give the gaskets something to grip. I've had good luck with RTV and haven't actually tried this with corks but it makes a lot of sense.
2. After a few years I seem to commonly see water leaks from the water port forward of cylinder #5. Why, I don't know. I've also seen it in the exact same spot on Chevy V8's and V6's, and recently even on a German Ford 4.0 V6 which is in no way related to the US small block engines. Gasket makers recommend not using sealer on the actual intake gaskets. I don't care, I've seen too many long term leaks. I put a very thin coat of Permatex "Aviation" type non-hardening gasket sealer around all four water ports (one at the end of each head). NOT the intake ports, they don't need sealer. Nor any other part of the two intake gaskets.
3. Assembly. Clean. Clean some more. RTV will not stick to an oily surface. For it to work effectively in this application the ends of the intake and block must be CLEAN and dry. Before I apply the RTV my last step is a quick wipe with a rag and lacquer thinner.
If you choose to apply sealer to the water ports do so and lay the "side" intake gaskets in place. Now get the RTV and lay a nice fat bead at each end of the block. Just to the edge of the side gaskets, keep in mind the RTV will be spread out when the intake is put on. Ideally a nice fat smooth bead exactly like what they squeeze out in toothpaste advertisement. Rather bigger than a pencil yet smaller than a fountain pen.
Keeping your gaskets aligned and the RTV from being smeared around when trying to place the intake on can be a pain. Smear the RTV too much and you've wasted it and have to start over. Simple solution. Find four bolts like your intake bolts, preferably longer. Cut the heads off and put one in each corner where the intake bolts will go. Just screw them in enough to where they are stable. Grab the intake, set it over the headless bolts and plop it straight down. Aligned. Get the middle bolts started and you can pull your aligning studs back out.
Since I do this fairly regularly I took the extra time to round the heads of my studs. I also cut a slot in the rounded ends so I can easily remove them with a regular screwdriver. This isn't an original idea. A good number of older Fords came from the factory with studs instead of bolts in the four corners. Shame they quit doing that.
I tighten all the intake bolts reasonably evenly then go 23-5 foot pounds (dunno what that is in Newton Meters, sorry). Start with the four closest to the center and criss cross as you go towards the ends. I find it a good idea, particularly with aluminum intakes, to go back and retorque the bolts after the car has been driven a couple of weeks. A couple of the bolts will be tough to get to with the carburetor back on but they aren't critical unless you find all the rest of the bolts to be way too loose or something. The ones you can't easily reach with the torque wrench I usually guestimate tighten with a regular wrench.
About all I can think of.
 
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