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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
So new to this form and see lots of good discussions on here. Anyhow, have Malibu with 383 stroker crate engine. Its blown and it has 750 holley on the top.

It's 35-40 degrees out and I have been having issues get the engine start. It cranks, turns over and then dies immediately. Fuel pressure reads at 6psi, changed air filter. Last weekend was warmer and car started without issues, but this time around no luck. I am not sure if it's weather or what.

Any advice and what to look for is very much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello all,
So new to this form and see lots of good discussions on here. Anyhow, have Malibu with 383 stroker crate engine. Its blown and it has 750 holley on the top.

It's 35-40 degrees out and I have been having issues get the engine start. It cranks, turns over and then dies immediately. Fuel pressure reads at 6psi, changed air
Nope unfortunately. I wish I did. I try to prime it with a single push but didn't help either.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Better start with TDC on compression stroke and check the rotor is pointing at plug 1 tower.
 

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More for Less Racer
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Cold weather, performance engine with a blower on it....pump the throttle like 5-6 times.....you got to wet the intake tract down for it to start.

You'll probably also have to play footsie with the throttle until the engine warms up a little....not likely for it to fire up cold and then just sit there and idle without stalling unless you keep tapping the throttle.
After it warms a little, then it should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cold weather, performance engine with a blower on it....pump the throttle like 5-6 times.....you got to wet the intake tract down for it to start.

You'll probably also have to play footsie with the throttle until the engine warms up a little....not likely for it to fire up cold and then just sit there and idle without stalling unless you keep tapping the throttle.
After it warms a little, then it should be fine.
Thank you Sir! Will definitely give it a try next time. I appreciate everyone's input.

Also will post an update on this try.
 

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Also does the carb have a choke and is it set and working?
With no choke it will to just as you said, start and stall. With no choke you will have to do just as Eric said keep playing with throttle to keep running until warm enough to idle
 

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Another consideration is how long it has been sitting since last run. I find that with my Holley if it has been sitting overnight or two, a double pump of the gas pedal will get it going even in the 40's Temps. If it has been a few more days, like a 5 to 7 day period since start, then more like 4 to 6 pumps and several tries will be needed to keep it running and some gentle pedal massaging will be needed in the first minute or so. After that it will settle down to a stable fast idle. Adjustment of the fast idle up to more like a 1600rpm idle on cold engine will make less massaging necessary but I just don't like to Rev a cold engine any more than necessary during initial warm up. Of course, that is with a well adjusted and correctly operating electric choke. Every few degrees of outside ambient temp difference will make a difference in how it operates with the choke. At best, 'automatic' operating chokes are a bit of guesswork by the engineer during development. Never exact but often 'good enough' design limitations employed here, lol! You might find that converting to a manual choke makes cold starts much easier and more predictable. I have found that my old 54 Chevy 3100 with a 261/265 inline 6 cyl driven almost daily year round was much more easily started and driven with manual cable operated choke and accelerator setup than my 'new' 72 C10 with Holley electric 'automatic' system on a BBC 406.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cold weather, performance engine with a blower on it....pump the throttle like 5-6 times.....you got to wet the intake tract down for it to start.

You'll probably also have to play footsie with the throttle until the engine warms up a little....not likely for it to fire up cold and then just sit there and idle without stalling unless you keep tapping the throttle.
After it warms a little, then it should be fine.
Yup, it worked. Did more than 7-8 times then stalled, but few trys and once warmed up it was just fine.

Thanks again and thanks to everyone. Very helpful
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Another consideration is how long it has been sitting since last run. I find that with my Holley if it has been sitting overnight or two, a double pump of the gas pedal will get it going even in the 40's Temps. If it has been a few more days, like a 5 to 7 day period since start, then more like 4 to 6 pumps and several tries will be needed to keep it running and some gentle pedal massaging will be needed in the first minute or so. After that it will settle down to a stable fast idle. Adjustment of the fast idle up to more like a 1600rpm idle on cold engine will make less massaging necessary but I just don't like to Rev a cold engine any more than necessary during initial warm up. Of course, that is with a well adjusted and correctly operating electric choke. Every few degrees of outside ambient temp difference will make a difference in how it operates with the choke. At best, 'automatic' operating chokes are a bit of guesswork by the engineer during development. Never exact but often 'good enough' design limitations employed here, lol! You might find that converting to a manual choke makes cold starts much easier and more predictable. I have found that my old 54 Chevy 3100 with a 261/265 inline 6 cyl driven almost daily year round was much more easily started and driven with manual cable operated choke and accelerator setup than my 'new' 72 C10 with Holley electric 'automatic' system on a BBC 406.
Definitely more than 7 pumps, but it fired up eventually and once warmed up was good to go.
 
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