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I speak with a lot of friends , and the opinon is the same , the question is:
the chevy block 3970010 with number 010 .020 is for the nickel ,ok is it for 1% tin and 2% nickel or is 10 % tin and 20% nickel ?
 

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what block has no tin or nickel and thicker cylinder walls ? I thought a high nickel block was desirable cause the tin helped the melting metal flow in the casting better to forge a stronger block and the nickel made it stronger.





Mustangsaly
 

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I think the 10% and 20% are typos that have been repeated over and over. If you have 30% nickel and tin in cast iron I don't think it would still be cast iron. I would like to know for sure either way but none of the sources I have found give actual proof that the metal content is different than standard blocks.

If anyone really knows I would love to hear it.

Jordon
 

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On the 010-020 blocks they have better main webbing compared to the 010 blocks which most of them are K blocks which you can find on the main caps and on the bellhousing area just below where the oil pressre gauge is connected to the block.

Compare the webbing of a K-block where the outter center bolts go down the threw into the webbing and check out a 010-020 block as its night a day differance and we have only seen very few K-blocks with good webbing,

And on some of the 010-020 blocks look for 2482 on the center caps as those are the GM performance caps.

We sonic test every stock GM block that comes in the shop and the 010-020 blocks don't seem to be any better then the 010 blocks from what we have seen.
 

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Mustangsaly said:
I thought a high nickel block was desirable cause the tin helped the melting metal flow in the casting better to forge a stronger block and the nickel made it stronger.
Important distinction here... Nickel makes it harder, not necessarily stronger. Its much like the debate between hypereutictic and forged pistons. If I'm building a high-rpm screamer, I'll chose a softer block because it can absorb more impact than a harder/more brittle block. Completing the analogy comparing this to pistons, forged pistons are stronger, but softer. They will deform and absorb more shock before failure. Cast or hyp pistons actually have a higher yield strength than forged, but when they go, they GO... like shatter.

Its kinda like glass. Really hard, but if you put just a little deformation pressure on it you can break it very easily.

Two of the highest nickel content blocks ever are the Cadillac 5200-series (425/472/500 family) and pretty much anything that International Harvester put on the road. Both are biased toward longevity and reliability in a low-rpm, low-power application. I've pulled Caddys apart with 120k on the ticker and still found crosshatches in the bores since they're so hard.

But don't rush to a hard block right away.

I don't know about the tin and flowing. It makes sense since tinning is a common part of soldering and leading things, but how that applies to molten iron and casting I don't know.
 
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