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I've built about 100 + 400 smallblocks in my time I used to own a chevy high performance shop. to say the least they are the easiest to make large toque and h.p from.I dynoed a block that made 522 hp 518 ft pd of torque all at under 6200 rpm at the price of less then 5000 dollars.in a 4000 pd car I ran 12'0s at 114 mph on pump fuel and ran 12 laps back to back one time to see consistency.(the brakes started to fail bad!!!!) don't recommend. the real reason the 400 gets shot down for getting hot is you must have the proper cooling system and if you want to spend the extra try Evans cooling it doesn't boil till 350 + degrees. because the cylinders are symised you get flash points where the cylinders join. Evan's won't try to run away with its high boiling point.
 

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400 small block

Is Evans cooling system a brand of a radiator? I have a 400 c.u. 1970 chevy engine bored .030 with moly ring set, hyperutectic pistons, crower compu-pro cam, trick flow 23 degree aluminum heads, hydraulic roller rockers, headers, engine is balanced and radiator is stock style handcrafted from brassworks. Oh, this is installed in a 1938 ford. Here is my problem. So long as Iam driving the temp. will stay around 200-210 degrees with a 160 degree thermostat, but whenever I have to stop and idle for any length of time [5 min or so] it will overheat. I have tried with a 180 degree stat and no stat at all with same results. I have two electric fans and radiator has no shroud and not enough room to install a stock fan blade. I did do something really stupid though and that is paint the top of the radiator with por-15 however The problem was there before. I hope I gave you enough information any help will be greatly appreciated. Many thanks :confused:
 

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First I've heard about this stuff, may have to try it in my current SBC 400 project.

"The following text was written to provide a brief narrative on the operational dynamics of the cooling process within an internal combustion engine and the problems that occur in such systems. Following the narrative, we detail how our NPG coolant solves these problems and other deficiencies of traditionally cooled internal combustion engines. In addition to handling the problems inherent in today's engines, NPG cooling also provides a range of performance benefits far beyond the capabilities of currently utilized cooling technology, for both gasoline and diesel engines. These benefits and performance gains are truly significant with a potentially enormous positive impact on the environment, fossil fuel consumption, and overall automotive design."

More here: http://www.evanscooling.com/main21.htm
 

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Classic=

Running 200+ with a 160 stat is excessive. You should be running 170-175.
Unless you have a major engine problem, there are only 3 things it could be.

1) Your radiator is too small,
2) your water flow is insufficient,
3) your air flow is insufficient.

There are a lot of threads on this site about your problem.

I suggest reading tech stuff on this site.

http://www.stewartcomponents.com/

You could also do a forum search for "airflow" etc.

check this thread http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/cooling-fan-tight-fit-93225.html?highlight=airflow
 

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Evans coolant is good. I believe in it.

Remember = from their information.......

Evans coolant does not boil until 367* so steam pockets are reduced/eliminated.

Evans coolant transfers heat only 68% as well as straight water, and 84% as well as 50/50 glycol-water mix.

It boils at higher temperatures but it also might make your system run hotter because it takes out more heat from the heads and it transfers heat less well.
 

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classic cruzer said:
Is Evans cooling system a brand of a radiator? I have a 400 c.u. 1970 chevy engine bored .030 with moly ring set, hyperutectic pistons, crower compu-pro cam, trick flow 23 degree aluminum heads, hydraulic roller rockers, headers, engine is balanced and radiator is stock style handcrafted from brassworks. Oh, this is installed in a 1938 ford. Here is my problem. So long as Iam driving the temp. will stay around 200-210 degrees with a 160 degree thermostat, but whenever I have to stop and idle for any length of time [5 min or so] it will overheat. I have tried with a 180 degree stat and no stat at all with same results. I have two electric fans and radiator has no shroud and not enough room to install a stock fan blade. I did do something really stupid though and that is paint the top of the radiator with por-15 however The problem was there before. I hope I gave you enough information any help will be greatly appreciated. Many thanks :confused:
Did you drill the heads for steam holes?
 

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classic cruzer said:
Yes, they are drilled. I wonder how that evans coolant would work with aluminum heads?
"Question: I have Magnesium and / or Aluminum components are Evans Waterless Coolants safe?
Answer: YES. Evans waterless coolants are compatible with all metals, because there is no water in our coolants and - no water should be used with Evans coolants - there is no electrolysis. We also eliminate corrosion - as long as the coolant is installed properly and all residual water is removed prior to filling with either NPG+ or NPGR."

http://www.evanscooling.com/main21.htm

Click on the FAQ (left side of the above web page).
 

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xntrik said:
Classic=

Running 200+ with a 160 stat is excessive. You should be running 170-175.
Unless you have a major engine problem, there are only 3 things it could be.

1) Your radiator is too small,
2) your water flow is insufficient,
3) your air flow is insufficient.

I vote for all three with emphasis on on 1 & 3.


Larry
 
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