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I have just brought home a 57 Nash Metropolitan. The engine is very tired and weak. My daughter wants to have an automatic transmission.
Im looking for suggestions for a 4 cyl. Automatic combinationtion . The more analog the better, I’m a carburetor kind of guy. But all suggestions are welcome oh yeah rear wheel drive
 

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Ford 2300 series 4cyl engine with C4 automatic transmission. C4 is small , light unit. Cores prices are getting high.
 

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Just went to a show this weekend and there was a Metropolitan there. That engine is SMALL. Had a lunchbox bigger that that! Wonder if an Iron Duke would fit? That engine is still available in the Postal vehicles I think. Get engine and trans as a package from the junkyard or look for an older Pontiac.
 

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MGB 1.8L with a BW 35 connected to it. That is a somewhat 'correct' powerplant as the Metro was actually built by BMC. Having owned an MGB, that is exactly what I would put into it. Little pushrod 4cyl makes near 100hp with dual carb but sounds great doing it.
 

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153 cid Chevy. Huge mass produced Chevy 4 cylinder. Used in early Nova's and other Chevys. Do not confuse this with the "Iron Duke" which is a different engine and pretty much of a Turd. The little 153 is still being produced, powering mercruiser boats and many forklifts. Tthe cid was increased for boats to 181 cid. The 153 were really reliable and also used in US postal delivery vehicles for about two decades. You can still buy parts for these. Simple pushrod engine. Looks like a 250 six with two cylinders cut off. It is not as tall as the 2300 Ford. The chevy 153 also has the same bellhousing bolt pattern as the SBC, so you can use a powerglide or turbo 350 trans. Keep it simple.
 

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The Metro engine is pretty small it is based off an Austin design probably the closest relative is the Datsun/Nissan A10 through A12 of 1970 thru 79.

Engines this small don’t do well with automatics.

Bogie
 

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The Metro engine is pretty small it is based off an Austin design probably the closest relative is the Datsun/Nissan A10 through A12 of 1970 thru 79.

Engines this small don’t do well with automatics.

Bogie
It was/ is a B series engine from BMC, a lower hp variant of the same engine that was in an MGA. I think they were 1,500 CC. Actually the Metro is mechanically identical to the MGA in most ways.

The MGB 1800 will drop right in giving a fairly large boost in power with the right intake and carbs
 

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If you have the fab skills to do the swap, I think BadWally is on the right track. The little Chevy will be reliable and easy to get parts for. Good luck finding a PowerGlide for it. A TH 350 will be easier to find.
 

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Just run a TBI 2.5 mated to the 4 cylinder 700r4. That has overdrive and buddy were going to be using it.

Run a narrowed ford 8.8 in the rear with 4.56 gearing and a tiny driveshaft.

By using the 4.56 gearing that little 90ish hp 2.5 should move right along with a top speed around 80mph.
It should be able to cruise the highway easily enough and have great acceleration around town.

You can convert a TBI 2.5 over to carb easily allowing you a large amount of cheap engines/replacment parts to run.

Drop in a diffrent distributior and slap a monojet onto the TBI intake. If hood clearence is a issue break out the welder and build a log intake.
 

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As mentioned already, beware of using an old style (just 2 or 3 speeds, no converter lock-up) auto trans behind a small 4-cylinder engine! That kind of engine produces very little torque at a higher RPM (compared to your average stock V8), all of which will be wasted spinning the torque converter, and with very little torque left to actually move the car. The car will be very slow/sluggish, not really pleasant in modern traffic, with very bad mileage.
I remember owning once a stock, late '70s BMW with the 2-litre (122 ci) engine with 3 speed auto trans, not fun, slow and a real gas guzzler!
Cerial seems to have the right idea with the th700r4. I would like to know which vehicles those 153 ci/700r4 combos came from?
 

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The problem with small engines and automatics is automatics need to use some of that meager power to operate their mechanisms and of coursed the inevitable losses in fluid couplings so the remaining power to drive the vehicle is not considered satisfactory nor safe.

I just wouldn’t consider these old coffins as suitable for my children, these were OK when I was young and there were no interstate highways, traffic was a lot slower than today and with half the population ever cities and the country side was nowhere as crowded as today. I guess my standing joke about old my home town in southern California which had population of 6800 in the 1960 census in the 2020 it‘s 180,000. Given this was all farmland that was developed into housing the basic streets were in-place as they are today so basically all these people are using the original farm street grid to get around, it’s quite a sight to see if you survive it. In spite of having a brother that still lives there I haven’t been back since my mother’s passing in 2007.

So get your daughter something modern and safe.

Bogie
 

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153 cid Chevy. Huge mass produced Chevy 4 cylinder. Used in early Nova's and other Chevys. Do not confuse this with the "Iron Duke" which is a different engine and pretty much of a Turd. The little 153 is still being produced, powering mercruiser boats and many forklifts. Tthe cid was increased for boats to 181 cid. The 153 were really reliable and also used in US postal delivery vehicles for about two decades. You can still buy parts for these. Simple pushrod engine. Looks like a 250 six with two cylinders cut off. It is not as tall as the 2300 Ford. The chevy 153 also has the same bellhousing bolt pattern as the SBC, so you can use a powerglide or turbo 350 trans. Keep it simple.
My main concern with them (having had several boats with them) is that they are not small or lightweight by any stretch. They are just behemoths given their smallish displacement. They also have zero aftermarket and the heads are awful. Not that the OP is necessarily thinking of hot rodding it, I just don't think it represents the best bang-per-pound ratio.

In the world of lightweight stuff, I might look to grabbing a 1E Toyota. 1ZZ would add some displacement without much weight, but they were all EFI which adds complexity... either in installation, or converting to carb if you want to go that way. Stoopid reliable, came with multiple RWD trans options. Find Toyota pickup from the 80s, yank engine/trans, install in Metro.

Some of the little VWs from the VAG COM era are light and internally reliable. Externally, not so much. Everything on the outside of the engine is made of hopes and unicorn pee.

I like WABOOM's idea. Snag a 4-cylinder and auto from a carbed Ranger. They'll run darn near forever and they're pretty light. I wouldn't do the same thing with an early S10, though. That's the Iron Duke and it's a big pathetic lump.
 

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Yes the 2.5 is a heavy pig(around 400lbs wet complete w acessories). But it is a cheap pig with a overdrive transmission with no custom work required.
Good chance you can find a complete running rusted first gen s10 with a 700r4 for less then $1500. Run a carb, distributior, and dumb down the early 700r4 to be dang near full analog while keeping a large selection of replacement parts.

There are several other engines that use the same 60 degree bellhousing. But I dont know what would be involved as far as torque converter spacing or starter placment. That could turn this into a expensive or never ending product.

So a s10 4 cylinder with the 60 degree and a ford 8.8 or the "free" s10 7.5 (4.11) if the width is not to wide.

I know the 1st gen s10 had 3 or 4 diffrent 7.5 widths. The 2wd being the narrowest. You may be able to just use a 4.11 rear axle($50 to$100) and fit it under that Nash's narrow rear. But if you need to narrow it further a dual short shaft 8.8 is far stronger.

I have a 86 2.5 "tbi" in the barn. Complete with v belts and such. I have a 91 complete on the shop floor. I just never felt the need to buy a hanging scale. But as far as iron blocks go they are fairly light weight.
More importantly they are everywhere and cheap.
 

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Best Nash Metro I ever saw was on a hog ride between my Washington St. home and my parents ranch outside San Diego when I stopped for gas in Grants Pass, Or. It was mounted to a 4x4 frame, Jeep probably, with a big block Chevy. Didn’t investigate as it was of those trips where I had to keep moving.

Bogie
 

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I have played with Metro before.
I play with MG and Austin Healey too.
I don't think this should be a daily driver for a new driver.
Get her a cheap new car to drive everyday, Like a Mitsubishi Mirage.
Save this Metropolitan project for father-daughter garage time.
This way you will teach her how to do projects the smart way.
Living in a project house and or driving a project car is no fun.

On the topic of motor swaps, you have even less room for a transmission.
The C4 is going to be your best fit and the 2300 is going to be a bit tall, but possible. There is a world of new possibilities from Asian makes, some of which will clear the bonnet when installed.
I think you know why.
We remember these things.
Nostalgia makes those catastrophies sound fun, but living through it... Not so fun.
 

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Get her a manual FWD 4 cylinder car she can bounce off some trees and still be fine in. Most people don't know how to drive a stick which makes for a bit of additional security.

Or pratice with a old wood truck in a field.

Teaching her how to drive a stick will make the metropolitan much more fun to drive and give her a new skill to use later in life.

A 2.3 with a T5 and a 8.8 with 4.11 will be a fun lightweight drivetrain. A bit of mustang/ranger, explorer, with a bit of pinto frontend sprinkled on top to make a reliable ride you can find parts for easily.
 
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