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I couldn't agree more John! For me the build is the part of owning and enjoying a car that's the biggest source of enjoyment. I like them at the end, but it's not nearly as much enjoyment as the build process. Even with some parts of the build being hard, or frustrating, they're still challenges I enjoy.
The '53 is exactly what Chevrolet would have offered if the engine, trans and components you used were available back in 1953 to make such a great combination!!
 

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Collector of "someday" cars
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I guess I'm the odd man out in this restoration business. I would LOVE nothing better than to have all my cars DONE, clean and shiny, sitting in a climate controlled, dustless building just waiting for me to get in and drive any of them wherever and whenever I wanted.
Since the move and tri-fecta failure of getting the '66 Chevelle to the final level I worked for and it deserves, I've lost some of the drive and enthusiasm to keep building the rest to have the same result.
The, seemingly, endless hours and funds going into the shop upgrade aren't helping any either. I need to get to a point where I CAN work on something again in a comfortable space and find the desire to keep going on them.
 

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Slow but willing learner
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Discussion Starter #5,346
I guess I'm the odd man out in this restoration business. I would LOVE nothing better than to have all my cars DONE, clean and shiny, sitting in a climate controlled, dustless building just waiting for me to get in and drive any of them wherever and whenever I wanted.
Since the move and tri-fecta failure of getting the '66 Chevelle to the final level I worked for and it deserves, I've lost some of the drive and enthusiasm to keep building the rest to have the same result.
The, seemingly, endless hours and funds going into the shop upgrade aren't helping any either. I need to get to a point where I CAN work on something again in a comfortable space and find the desire to keep going on them.
I understand Mitch. The state of mind you are in plays a big part in the enjoyment of the build. I spent four hours making the adjustment screws yesterday for the quarter windows. For that four hours though, I was in my own little world, totally relaxed, and at peace. The finished car will be nice to have but will not give me near the satisfaction the build has.....Not to mention, they start going down hill the day you finish them.

Most of my friends were really into the building part until we all started getting so old. For many their health limits what they are able to do now. For me it is mostly about free time. Personally my health is pretty good for 75.

I will have to say though, I have built my last basket case. The 36 roadster is next. It desperately needs and deserves to be freshened up.

John
 

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I guess I'm the odd man out in this restoration business. I would LOVE nothing better than to have all my cars DONE, clean and shiny, sitting in a climate controlled, dustless building just waiting for me to get in and drive any of them wherever and whenever I wanted.
Since the move and tri-fecta failure of getting the '66 Chevelle to the final level I worked for and it deserves, I've lost some of the drive and enthusiasm to keep building the rest to have the same result.
The, seemingly, endless hours and funds going into the shop upgrade aren't helping any either. I need to get to a point where I CAN work on something again in a comfortable space and find the desire to keep going on them.
I felt frustrated when building my house. I felt I would never get back at it. When it was time to do so, I was in a daze about it. Started picking away at it and got back in the groove. You will too. Keep building on em, keep putting out feelers for a painter and one will eventually drop right into your lap and you'll have him doing all your cars later.
 

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Mitch and Matt fix cars to buy supper. John and Jari fix cars to keep. It occurred to me recently that yep, everyone here would rather work on their car than drive it. Except me. Cast aside which is right or wrong and consider the evidence, its true.

Finis coronat opus. The end crowns the work.

We are to work, but also to enjoy the end result. Least-wise, best I can figure.:ROFLMAO:

There ain't no such critter as frugal screws but John I'm glad you got time to lose yourself in car for awhile. I know, I do it all day. Well, some days more or less than others. But you done good on those screws. Slick solution.
 

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Slow but willing learner
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Discussion Starter #5,349
Remember Matt. I did it for a living for a while. I hated it after a short time. After I closed my shop it was two years before I started playing with my own cars again.

There is a world of difference between doing it for a living and doing it it for fun. Suppose I had to bill the customer for those four screws? No thanks. I will just get lost in my own little world and tinker away not caring how long it takes and how much it will cost. I can also fix my hood the way I want and not worry about how the customer wants it.

I admire what you do a lot but I don't envy you at all. You earn every penny you get and a whole lot more.

John
 

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You are so right and theres yet another world between having a shop and working at one. Likewise, remember I fixed up a car for power tours and went on at least half a dozen in it. Ultimately, hollow victory is what I found in that. I think each of the four of us know where the others are coming from and I think TMP hit the nail on the head. Available facility. Work space. I did my one in my cramped space and many years later it is still cramped. But the car still works, and it is enough. Considering my occupation, yep. You certainly are talking to someone who fully grasps the concept of taking pleasure in working with the hands even when it hurts. The rest of you are much better at using your heads than me but we all enjoy doing the work well.
 

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I will endevour to persevere
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I was away from building for 2 years and it seemed like I would never get back to it. Getting started again was hard as I had lost all the continuity with where I was in the process of the project and I had to basically start over and of course new shop, new tool locations, and different atmosphere, slowed me a bit but now I feel like I am back moving forward making progress. I can go out and lose myself in some aspect of the coupe, or shop, or something, and now I am getting in the groove and only what I am doing at the moment matters. I am less stressed more mellow and a rather pleasant individual. However I am like a colt 45 with a hair trigger.... :cool:
 

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At a month shy of 70 yrs. old, it's not as easy as it was even a decade ago for me! When I built my old Austin I had just retired 10 years ago, and I was so excited to be building it that I worked 8-12 hrs. a day, almost 7 days a week! And I was in heaven being able to do what I loved, and not worry about customers calling, or any other interruptions. My wife would bring me out lunch, and call me when dinner was ready. I still recall every detail of the build with pleasure.
I worked for the local Cadillac dealer right out of high school in 1968, and they sent me to the GM Training Center. Being young and eager I could work on cars all day, and still be excited to work on cars in the evening, and weekends. I just lived and breathed cars then. But I saw and heard many of the "old timers" I worked with who had project cars at home languishing, and they told me I'd be like them in time. Fortunately for me I got drafted in late 1969, and when I returned to Cadillac they were slow, and I only worked 20 hrs. a week. So I found another job, and ended up following my dad's career as an electrician. That career change made the difference in keeping me always interested in building cars, since it wasn't more of the same when I got home.
 

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Discussion Starter #5,353 (Edited)
LOL, the LH quarter window is finally in and adjusted. After three weeks of trying to figure these things out I finally determined we had the incorrect regulators, the stops were installed on wrong sides and the hinges were installed on opposite sides of the car from where they belonged. Also the chrome plating had added enough material they would not fit into the hinge block without lightly sanding them with a 3” rolock disc.

All is well that ends well! The RH side should be much easier. 👍




 

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Discussion Starter #5,356
I sure don't enjoy glass work on cars! It rarely goes easy, or even well for me. That looks spectacular John!
I hear that. Thanks. I have the glass done. Now, on to adjusting the convertible top irons. I am afraid they will make the glass look like a walk in the park.

John


 

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I had issues with the glass windshield halves on my '39 coupe. All the rest of my glass went easily. But the windshield halves were just too big for the openings. I fought them all day, and eventually got them in. But I went to grab some glass cleaner, and as I started to clean the glass the right half began cracking, right before my eyes!
I contacted the glass supplier, and he sent me one side, but after telling him how much smaller I needed, he sent the same size again! I ended up having to carefully remove rubber material from my Steele City weatherstrip, all around the perimeter edge. Took about 30 minutes on my belt sander, but when I got done the glass went in easier, and sealed up nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter #5,358
When I finished cleaning up the shop yesterday, the last thing I did was run the convertible top irons up half way. I suspected they would not stay there and would settle either in the raised or lowered position but I had to quit. It was time for the lady who was staying with Barb to go home.

Imagine my surprise when I went to the basement this afternoon and found that they had settled in the raised position and gravity had brought them down on the alignment pins ready for me to pull the latch handle.......Amazing.

There is still some adjustment needed but this is pretty amazing after me having them all apart to repair the rust and paint. All that and not having even turned a screw yet.

Life is good!👍

John
F4E0030E-CCF0-4766-9322-C08872E89245.jpeg
 

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Guess it depends how far up they were? I would have guessed they'd have settled back to retracted, not against the pins. Must have been up enough.
 
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