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You might try the 1964-67 Chevy II Nova front sump pan, pump, pump driveshaft, and pick-up. The early Chevy II's were much like the early Mustang. Both are front sump pan, shock tower designs.
Motor mounts and trans mount are going to be custom, for sure.
Headers for the early Chevy II might also be a fit. No gaurantees though.

You may have to use an aftermarket notched rear sump race pan for the Chevy II.....but without pictures and some measurements it is hard to say online exactly what is going to fit and what you are going to have to either fabricate yourself or pay someone to do it custom for you.

What you are doing is not exactly a popular swap, most Ford guys bleed Ford blue and can't stand the Chevy motors. Not going to be a ton of info online but you might get lucky and someone has documented a build somewhere.
 

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would that be the easiest way to put it in? Might as well start research now, you know? so you have to disassemble the whole top just to put it in the car?
Just research "1967 Mustang FE engine install" or "swap"(the 390 is part of the "FE" engine family of big blocks).
It's a really tight fit, even with stock exhaust manifolds. Changing spark plugs is a pain-in-the-ash. Header fit is challenging.

If you want an easy swap, 5.0L/302" small block, or a 331or 347" stroker using the 302 block is an easy, buy the parts and drop it in deal.
A 351Windsor makes a nice swap candidate, or a stroker built on a 351W block, header fit is a little tighter.
Then there is the 351C, or a 351W with Cleveland type heads(called a "Cleavor"), its do-able, most all the parts are available but header fit gets tighter yet.

Then it's a pretty big jump in physical size to the 390FE....and weight. Fe is among the heaviest of big blocks. Big ole hunk of 1950's tech and design.

Was your car originally a inline6 cylinder, or a V8 small block 289?
 

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It was originally a v8 smallblock 289
I would think a 1990's -2005-ish hydraukic roller cam 302 or 351W is still a pretty easy to find engines. Convert it back to carburetor if you don't want the modern fuel injection(The EFI makes a really nice daily or nice day driver though).
Drop it right in with just a motor mount and maybe an oil pan change depending on what specific small block you happen to find, but the parts are all easily available.
No fabrication needed, just wrenching.

A lot smarter choice than the 390 FE.
 

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Would you be willing to put an aftermarket Mustang II design front clip under the car??

Get rid of Fords goofy shock tower front suspension and the steering box and linkage with a package kit that takes up less engine bay space and has rack and pinion steering.
Added plus is there are adapter motor mount kits and headers available for that front suspension cradle to hold an SBC right in it..

Now you can drop that SBC right in with common street rod/pro-touring chassis parts.

This is just the first that came up in a quick search, I'm sure there are others both cheaper and more expensive if you search.
IFS Front Suspension Kit: 64-70 Mustang, 67-70 Cougar, 60-65 Falcon, 64-65 Comet - HEIDTS®
 

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I hear ya, I thought it over and did some research and im just going to make the 350 fit. I put months into the rebuild. So anything that will help with the fit that I need to know? (schools starting next monday so all this will be after school)
Other than the info in the first couple posts about oil pan fit and header fit, you'll probably have to notch and plate the shock towers inward a bit for header or manifold clearance(welder needed). You'll have to modify or fabricate up a trans crossmember and mount.
You'll need a GM oriented radiator, as GM uses opposite corners for inlet and outlet than Ford does.
You'll likely need to use the short style SBC water pump and accessory brackets, I'd bet on that.
You may have to put a clearance bulge in the firewall for the Chevy distributor since it is in the rear instead of the front of the engine like Ford. Small cap GM may fit, but HEI is likely to mandate clearancing the firewall.
Chevy fuel pump is on opposite side of the motor from the Ford pump location and the Ford fuel line to the rear tank.
Driveshaft rework of course
 

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Ok, right now the prices on wood is kind up there but my dad and I just talked ab it and we have a good solution. I believe what we can do is get all the measurements from the engine while its suspended above the car, and get those dimensions along with the engine mount stencil and see if the fabrication people at my school would be happy to fabricate some engine mounts. I was thinking since we have to bring the engine forward we could probable weld a support for the front of the engine mount, like a removable one. Of course I would have to talk to the teacher first, and also look at metal prices but its a good possibility. (They build trailers in class so it would be a good project.)
Your gonna get bit on parts that won't fit if you try to figure out mounts and adapter plates with the engine hanging in air unless you can hang it level, square to axle centerline, and with the correct driveline angles down in the engine bay where you intend it's final position to be.
Easier to just be a carpenter and block it into position using the oil pan rail edge of the block in each side, and the trans tail.
Set the engine back as far as you can in order to leave enough space for all you front accessory's.
Then test fit things like oil filter to steering column, and exhaust fit.

Then make cardboard temlplates of any adapter plates you may make.

Get one of the available front sump pans or that street/strip pan that is notched and have it on hand for fit at the same time you trial fit the engine and trans.
Not knowing what distributor you have, i'd recommend a small cap distributor, rather than the big HEI, to help with fit at the firewall.
You may want to hunt up several sets of old headers for chevy cars as you might get lucky with something.....Iremember hearing '62-67 Chevy II headers would fit a '70-77 Ford Maverick.....which is pretty close in size to the Mustang engine bay.

Problem with using the stock Mustang radiator is it may not be up to the job, combined with the fact the inlet and outlaet are on the wrong corners and so the radiator hoses become a nightmare.
 

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Ill look for one. My brother , strongly, discouraged me from the 351 windsor for some reason
Probably because he doesn't know any better. The 351W is a great base to build off of, if you wanted you could build it clear up to a 408" to 427" stroker in the stock block.
Weak point is just about every stock head ever put on one, so with stock heads its just like every other small block ford with the same problem....intake ports are just too small.
Put an aftermarket head on it and watch it wake right the hell up.

Just shop for a 351W short block....you don't need the rest of a stock motor because everything else is going to be an aftermarket part.....heads, rocker arms, pushrods, valvecovers, intake, waterpump, oil pan, oil pump shaft, distributor, headers, carburetor/fuel injection.
I think any Ford is bad on mileage.
Take a look at the 5.0 Mustangs, 1984-96-ish.. Decent power, easily hopped up and still get good mileage 25-26 mpg hwy.
 

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Also, would this deal be kind of what you guys are talking about?Single-Quad Manifold and carb Kit for Small-Block Ford 289-302
Something like that would be fine....but wait until you find an engine before you jump and buy that....the 289/302W manifold and 351W manifold are not the same size....the 351W is a "tall block" basically....289/302 block is 8.2" deck height and the 351W is 9.5" deck height.
They use the same cylinder heads but the 351W mounts them up higher and farther apart, so the intake has to be bigger and wider.
 

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I agree, it is doable and the wiring harness rework info is out there, just do your research.

Best way to go on the modern swap is buy the entire donor car....pull the drivetrain, nearly the entire wiring harness, ECU, instrument cluster, and fuel pump out of the tank ......and then part out and scrap out the remains of the donor to get some of the donor cost back for the swap project.
You're not going to transplant the instrument cluster into the mustang and ruin that vintage dash vibe, but keeping the cluster allows you to test the wiring connections during the swap.

The Mustang set-up is the only way you'll get a modern Overdrive manual trans, if you want to have fun and go that with instead of an automatic transmission.

With buying the engine, I shouldn't have to buy a master rebuild kit so that will save some more money. And for the fuel system conversion kit do you think this would work?67 68 Ford Mustang FITECH 600hp EFI Fuel Injection Gas Tank Conversion Kit 90ohm for sale online | eBay
A tank set-up kit like that is a good way to go if you don't want to try to piece it all together yourself.

Even if you don't do the modern swap and just do a carburetor engine, i would strongly recommend you buy a complete new wiring harness for the car. It will save you a bunch of frustration down the road.
 
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