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Would you be willing to put an aftermarket Mustang II design front clip under the car??

Get rid of Fords goofy shock tower front suspension and the steering box and linkage with a package kit that takes up less engine bay space and has rack and pinion steering.
Added plus is there are adapter motor mount kits and headers available for that front suspension cradle to hold an SBC right in it..

Now you can drop that SBC right in with common street rod/pro-touring chassis parts.

This is just the first that came up in a quick search, I'm sure there are others both cheaper and more expensive if you search.
IFS Front Suspension Kit: 64-70 Mustang, 67-70 Cougar, 60-65 Falcon, 64-65 Comet - HEIDTS®
 

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I hear ya, I thought it over and did some research and im just going to make the 350 fit. I put months into the rebuild. So anything that will help with the fit that I need to know? (schools starting next monday so all this will be after school)
Other than the info in the first couple posts about oil pan fit and header fit, you'll probably have to notch and plate the shock towers inward a bit for header or manifold clearance(welder needed). You'll have to modify or fabricate up a trans crossmember and mount.
You'll need a GM oriented radiator, as GM uses opposite corners for inlet and outlet than Ford does.
You'll likely need to use the short style SBC water pump and accessory brackets, I'd bet on that.
You may have to put a clearance bulge in the firewall for the Chevy distributor since it is in the rear instead of the front of the engine like Ford. Small cap GM may fit, but HEI is likely to mandate clearancing the firewall.
Chevy fuel pump is on opposite side of the motor from the Ford pump location and the Ford fuel line to the rear tank.
Driveshaft rework of course
 

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This pan is probably your best bet at getting the SBC to fit the Ford steering linkage.


Aluminum head’s and intake plus an aluminum coolant pump will get the engine weight down to that of a Windsor block Ford. This will keep you out of suspension and brake mods to accommodate the heavier Chevy engine. You’ll have to fabricate adapters for the engine mounts, taking a play from S10 swaps the GM 60 degree V6 mounts may work to clear the cross member yet keep the engine low as possible in the body.

You're likely to have to fabricate headers, the Ford steering box location competes with space making the drivers side a real pain. The other headache is the rear mount Chevy distributor, that’s going to say a lot regarding positioning the engine for service space of the distributor.

There are adapters to connect the Chevy engine to the Ford transmission. Chances are pretty good that the driveshaft length will need adjusting. Changining to a Chevy transmission will get into spline diameter and count issues so keeping the Ford gear box saves that pain. if a stick you just run a Ford disk in a Chevy clutch.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
This pan is probably your best bet at getting the SBC to fit the Ford steering linkage.


Aluminum head’s and intake plus an aluminum coolant pump will get the engine weight down to that of a Windsor block Ford. This will keep you out of suspension and brake mods to accommodate the heavier Chevy engine. You’ll have to fabricate adapters for the engine mounts, taking a play from S10 swaps the GM 60 degree V6 mounts may work to clear the cross member yet keep the engine low as possible in the body.

You're likely to have to fabricate headers, the Ford steering box location competes with space making the drivers side a real pain. The other headache is the rear mount Chevy distributor, that’s going to say a lot regarding positioning the engine for service space of the distributor.

There are adapters to connect the Chevy engine to the Ford transmission. Chances are pretty good that the driveshaft length will need adjusting. Changining to a Chevy transmission will get into spline diameter and count issues so keeping the Ford gear box saves that pain. if a stick you just run a Ford disk in a Chevy clutch.

Bogie
the car came with some new springs to put on the car, so all i would need for the suspension is the shock absorber. I do have the chevy transmission and I can fabricate some of the parts like the engine mount adapter. The headers should be no problem at all (I do have the original chevy headers to use/ cut up.) The mounts that came with the car are 69 chevy v8 mounts. Do you think those would work?
 

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You’re arriving at the cut and try details, given this is off the experience list of those of us that responded, your cutting fresh trail.

When I talked about the small block Ford into my 80 Monza it was a pleasant surprise how easy it was just using a 4x4 pan and fitting a Ford radiator. It was close to a bolt in. Going the other way Chevy into Ford is going to be harder as the exhaust has to compete with space used for steering where Ford into Chevy that’s not a problem. And I used the GM trasnmission which was a Saginaw 4 speed from behind the original V6 with some beefing up that worked fine and this relieved having to rework tranny mounts and drive shaft. In your case the rear mount distributor of the Chevy is going to determine where the engine sits. That might force an adaption to where the rear trans mount has to be located which wi’ll affect the drive shaft length which is also going to require some adaption for the Chevy transmission slip yoke and whatever mods are required to adapt the drive shaft to the Chevy U-joint.

Up front you’ll need to find a Chevy radiator that fits or comes to a reasonable enough fit with some mounting mods because the pump inlet and coolant return are reversed sides compared to Ford.

You’ll find some aftermarket support which may be useful check out this link:

Bogid
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
You’re arriving at the cut and try details, given this is off the experience list of those of us that responded, your cutting fresh trail.

When I talked about the small block Ford into my 80 Monza it was a pleasant surprise how easy it was just using a 4x4 pan and fitting a Ford radiator. It was close to a bolt in. Going the other way Chevy into Ford is going to be harder as the exhaust has to compete with space used for steering where Ford into Chevy that’s not a problem. And I used the GM trasnmission which was a Saginaw 4 speed from behind the original V6 with some beefing up that worked fine and this relieved having to rework tranny mounts and drive shaft. In your case the rear mount distributor of the Chevy is going to determine where the engine sits. That might force an adaption to where the rear trans mount has to be located which wi’ll affect the drive shaft length which is also going to require some adaption for the Chevy transmission slip yoke and whatever mods are required to adapt the drive shaft to the Chevy U-joint.

Up front you’ll need to find a Chevy radiator that fits or comes to a reasonable enough fit with some mounting mods because the pump inlet and coolant return are reversed sides compared to Ford.

You’ll find some aftermarket support which may be useful check out this link:

Bogid
so what your saying is I need to make a mount that will 1. support the engine while connecting it to the car (kinda like weld a removable plate) then with the metal fan off, try to find a radiator that would fit into the car, and 2. figure out a fan solution? The mustang did come with an original radiator do you think that would work? My dad and I are investing in an engine lift because we dont have one (we had access to a backhoe to put it on the stand) also, with the exhaust, would it be better to try to drop it out the front rather then in the back? like kinda in front/behind the tire. I know it would be kinda loud and it would be basically a straight pipe but that might be an easier solution rather then having to deal with the space problem
 

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Well I love the idea and the fact that it will piss off so many people, but the big question is when do you want to drive this car? And I am all for you learning how to hack wack and weld.

You have been given great advice on here from probably a 150+ years of experience in hot rodding,I know you have rebuilt the engine and what to see it run and have a car you want to drive. There are a few ways to carry this out but struggling to take on this type of challenge, will definitely teach you many things. Things about yourself, how to curse, and how to weld, fab, and engineer things.

I have to ask, have you looked to see if there is someone in need of a SBC? Maybe someone has a sbf that will trade you? Maybe someone has Camaro but wants a Mustang sounds like a good trade.

seeing your back in school there will be a lot of things that come up and have forbid you start dating, that can suck up a lot of time, unless you start dating a gear head that likes hot rodding.

I myself would find SBF and go have fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Well I love the idea and the fact that it will piss off so many people, but the big question is when do you want to drive this car? And I am all for you learning how to hack wack and weld.

You have been given great advice on here from probably a 150+ years of experience in hot rodding,I know you have rebuilt the engine and what to see it run and have a car you want to drive. There are a few ways to carry this out but struggling to take on this type of challenge, will definitely teach you many things. Things about yourself, how to curse, and how to weld, fab, and engineer things.

I have to ask, have you looked to see if there is someone in need of a SBC? Maybe someone has a sbf that will trade you? Maybe someone has Camaro but wants a Mustang sounds like a good trade.

seeing your back in school there will be a lot of things that come up and have forbid you start dating, that can suck up a lot of time, unless you start dating a gear head that likes hot rodding.

I myself would find SBF and go have fun
Ok, so I took a welding and fab class the past 2 years so I have that, I basically grew up with a tool in my hand, and I am not really into dating atm. As for the camero thing, I have friends that would love to see this thing rolling down the street. Ive been doing some thinking and I kinda know what would be a good Idea.

1. take my metal fan blade off (more frontal clearance)
2. drop the exhaust right behind/in front of the front tire so I dont have to deal with those exhaust problems
3. custom fabricate some sbc 350 to 69 v8 mounts (they fit the same as the 67 mounts) and weld some support
4. I need to bring the engine forward and lean it back a lil so i have some more clearance (and maybe a tiny bit up for the oil pan clearance)
Also, im doing this to piss of my older brother who said it will never work, Lol
 

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My dream car was a 60's mustang, this mustang was a steal of a deal. I am just not looking to trade it if you know what I mean.
I think we’ve given you enough technical detail to get well started. Load up on 2x4’s, 1x4’s and some carpenter shims and wedges. You can use this wood for cribbing to get your set ups and angles figured out. The cool way would be to buy a plastic dummy mock-up engine but they are pretty pricy so your going to have to use the old techniques of cribbing the setup to get your final dimensions for mounts, clearances, etc.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I think we’ve given you enough technical detail to get well started. Load up on 2x4’s, 1x4’s and some carpenter shims and wedges. You can use this wood for cribbing to get your set ups and angles figured out. The cool way would be to buy a plastic dummy mock-up engine but they are pretty pricy so your going to have to use the old techniques of cribbing the setup to get your final dimensions for mounts, clearances, etc.

Bogie
Ok, right now the prices on wood is kind up there but my dad and I just talked ab it and we have a good solution. I believe what we can do is get all the measurements from the engine while its suspended above the car, and get those dimensions along with the engine mount stencil and see if the fabrication people at my school would be happy to fabricate some engine mounts. I was thinking since we have to bring the engine forward we could probable weld a support for the front of the engine mount, like a removable one. Of course I would have to talk to the teacher first, and also look at metal prices but its a good possibility. (They build trailers in class so it would be a good project.)
 

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Ok, right now the prices on wood is kind up there but my dad and I just talked ab it and we have a good solution. I believe what we can do is get all the measurements from the engine while its suspended above the car, and get those dimensions along with the engine mount stencil and see if the fabrication people at my school would be happy to fabricate some engine mounts. I was thinking since we have to bring the engine forward we could probable weld a support for the front of the engine mount, like a removable one. Of course I would have to talk to the teacher first, and also look at metal prices but its a good possibility. (They build trailers in class so it would be a good project.)
Your gonna get bit on parts that won't fit if you try to figure out mounts and adapter plates with the engine hanging in air unless you can hang it level, square to axle centerline, and with the correct driveline angles down in the engine bay where you intend it's final position to be.
Easier to just be a carpenter and block it into position using the oil pan rail edge of the block in each side, and the trans tail.
Set the engine back as far as you can in order to leave enough space for all you front accessory's.
Then test fit things like oil filter to steering column, and exhaust fit.

Then make cardboard temlplates of any adapter plates you may make.

Get one of the available front sump pans or that street/strip pan that is notched and have it on hand for fit at the same time you trial fit the engine and trans.
Not knowing what distributor you have, i'd recommend a small cap distributor, rather than the big HEI, to help with fit at the firewall.
You may want to hunt up several sets of old headers for chevy cars as you might get lucky with something.....Iremember hearing '62-67 Chevy II headers would fit a '70-77 Ford Maverick.....which is pretty close in size to the Mustang engine bay.

Problem with using the stock Mustang radiator is it may not be up to the job, combined with the fact the inlet and outlaet are on the wrong corners and so the radiator hoses become a nightmare.
 

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If you’re nitpicking the cost of an engine crane you might as well quit while you’re ahead!
it will be the lowest cost item in your fantasy build.
you can find them cheaper than this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
If you’re nitpicking the cost of an engine crane you might as well quit while you’re ahead!
it will be the lowest cost item in your fantasy build.
you can find them cheaper than this one.
Near me I found a $200 one that is a good quality one. This "fantasy build" will become a reality build thanks to my teachers, friends and family. If I sounded mean saying this then sorry, cause i don't mean to. Talking to my teacher he told me I can come after school and fabricate the parts I need. Thanks for the link though.
 

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An engine hoist is something that if you ask around someone may let you borrow it for a few days.

Just make sure your using it on a level surface and keep it as low as possible minimizing anything below the actual thing your lifting.

Removing the front clip may make things easier. But depending on the rust may be a job in itself. If leaving the front clip a engine leveler can be used to help guide the thing in.

As far as the engine measurment goes. Get a piece of cardboard and make a template using the back of the block tracing around the block and heads.
Measure the width of the oil pan (not adding any sump) and width of the intake.
Now you can make this out of cardboard. But a sheet of plywood, some wood glue, and some wood screws will give you a lightweight mock up block that wont deform like cardboard eventually will.
They sell these things. But you can also make one for around $30(not including the cost of a skill saw) and some time out of plywood.
Once you have your plywood mockup block you can get the lets say 20 pound thing into the engine bay and see where things like the sump will need to be or what simply won't work.
This will give you a close estimate without moving around or getting your paws under a 700lb engine.

3/8" plywood lets you do things like screw on headers or engine mounts (using washers) to mock those up also.
This wont be perfect. But if you take your measurments a few times it has the potential to be very close.

Then when you have most of it figured out using the lightweight mock up block you can lift up that heavy engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
An engine hoist is something that if you ask around someone may let you borrow it for a few days.

Just make sure your using it on a level surface and keep it as low as possible minimizing anything below the actual thing your lifting.

Removing the front clip may make things easier. But depending on the rust may be a job in itself. If leaving the front clip a engine leveler can be used to help guide the thing in.

As far as the engine measurment goes. Get a piece of cardboard and make a template using the back of the block tracing around the block and heads.
Measure the width of the oil pan (not adding any sump) and width of the intake.
Now you can make this out of cardboard. But a sheet of plywood, some wood glue, and some wood screws will give you a lightweight mock up block that wont deform like cardboard eventually will.
They sell these things. But you can also make one for around $30(not including the cost of a skill saw) and some time out of plywood.
Once you have your plywood mockup block you can get the lets say 20 pound thing into the engine bay and see where things like the sump will need to be or what simply won't work.
This will give you a close estimate without moving around or getting your paws under a 700lb engine.

3/8" plywood lets you do things like screw on headers or engine mounts (using washers) to mock those up also.
This wont be perfect. But if you take your measurments a few times it has the potential to be very close.

Then when you have most of it figured out using the lightweight mock up block you can lift up that heavy engine.
As for the engine hoist, my brothers and I will use it a lot otherwise we wouldnt be buying it.
 
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